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Baby Monkey, Private Eye
This topic is about Baby Monkey, Private Eye
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Specific Books & Authors > looking for some expert opinion is it a picture book or a graphic novel?

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message 1: by Elspeth (new)

Elspeth Hall (elspeth_grace) | 141 comments Firstly apologies if this is the wrong folder.
I am looking for the opinion of picture book aficionados.

Is Baby Monkey, Private Eye a picture book or a graphic novel???? The book claims it is both and our local library is unsure which section it should be filed under.


message 2: by Manybooks (last edited Mar 22, 2018 08:05AM) (new)

Manybooks | 7247 comments Mod
I have not read the book, but I was under the impression that if a book is in a comic book format, it should probably be considered a graphic novel? But considering the book is 192 pages long, I would not consider something with that many pages a picture book?


message 3: by Cheryl is busier irl atm., Newbery Club host (new) - rated it 3 stars

Cheryl is busier irl atm. (cherylllr) | 6252 comments Mod
One of my libraries has it in Juvenile Graphics. The others have it in regular Juvenile Fiction (you know, the same place as illustrated books like Ivy and Bean and novels like The Yearling).

An argument could be made that it's a picture book, or that it's a leveled reader, but that's a stretch and a red herring.

Assuming your library has Selznick's other books, Wonderstruck and Hugo Cabret, it seems to me it would make the most sense to put it there with them... that's where patrons who are most interested will see it!


message 4: by Megan (new)

Megan (appaloosa05) | 14 comments We have it in Go, which is our highest level of readers (basically early chapter books like Ivy and Bean, Flat Stanley, Clementine, etc...). Since it is longer I would probably shelve it with chapter books even though it is illustrated, but it doesn't appear to be as high of a reading level as Selznick's other books.


message 5: by Cheryl is busier irl atm., Newbery Club host (new) - rated it 3 stars

Cheryl is busier irl atm. (cherylllr) | 6252 comments Mod
Ok, so you really have fine distinctions then. Hm. Go, as in Ready Set Go? If so, neat idea. I can imagine this being a Go book, then, sure.


message 6: by Jennifer (last edited Mar 23, 2018 07:09AM) (new)

Jennifer (JenIsNotaBookSnob) (jenisnotabooksnob) | 170 comments Our library just got his in and we are going to put it in juvenile fiction with his other books. It is an oddball book and I was tempted to put it in regular picture books or EZ readers as that's more the reading level of the book. But, the book length makes it more of a juvenile fiction book. It isn't really a graphic as those usually have speech bubbles and boxes.
Selznick is excellent at making these strange books.. lol

Edited to add: This book is about a guided reading level of F or so, around first grade level which is why I was tempted to place it in EZ readers. However, to avoid confusion, we generally only place books that have clearly marked reading levels in that section. By process of elimination, it ended up in juvenile fiction.


message 7: by Elspeth (new)

Elspeth Hall (elspeth_grace) | 141 comments I haven't read the entire thing I just looked a the first dozen pages. There is only one sentence to a page. If that. And the vocabulary is quite basic so it doesn't meet the criteria for the "race ahead" section which has the likes of Matilda and King Coo, nor does it sit well with our "i can read" section as these are meant to build reading stamina so tend to be paragraph per page. Its American English means we cant put it into the Oxford reading tree section. On the other hand it is to long, as manybooks said, to go in our picture book section....... hmmm. I shall pass on all your sugestions.
Our library bought it (despite its american English ~pants/trousers~) because they thought it would attract reluctant readers.
Perhaps we shall just have to have it on a stand all of its lonesome.


message 8: by Megan (new)

Megan (appaloosa05) | 14 comments Cheryl wrote: "Ok, so you really have fine distinctions then. Hm. Go, as in Ready Set Go? If so, neat idea. I can imagine this being a Go book, then, sure."

We do. Ready is very beginning readers with one or two sentences on a page e.g. Biscuit, Elephant and Piggie. Set is readers with a few sentences on a page such as Frog and Toad, Katie Woo. And then as I mentioned Go is beginning chapter books. Within the sections books are organized alphabetically by the author's last name.

We don't have books organized by number/grade level because we don't want kids to feel ashamed if they're reading at a different level than their actual grade level.


message 9: by Cheryl is busier irl atm., Newbery Club host (new) - rated it 3 stars

Cheryl is busier irl atm. (cherylllr) | 6252 comments Mod
Megan, that sounds like a great system for the right size library.


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