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Archive Before 9/2021 > Lord of the Flies Starter Discussion

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message 1: by Chrys (new)

Chrys Fey (chrysfey) Lord of the Flies:

NOTE: You can answer the following questions and discuss them here. You don't have to answer them all, though. Just the ones you want to answer. Or you can share your thoughts/review on the book in general.

To create a separate topic for Lord of the Flies: Go to the Discussion Board and click “new topic” at the top (it’s in fine print). Choose “Feb/March Lord of the Flies” for the folder, create your topic, and then click “post.”

Let’s start!



1. The little boy with a scar on his face says there’s a beasty, a big snake, that comes out at night. Later, when they light a fire atop the mountain, they end up setting the forest blew on fire. And they suspect that little boy is in the forest…

“A tree exploded in the fire like a bomb. Tall swatches of creepers rose for a moment into view, agonized, and went down again. The little boys screamed at them. ‘Snakes! Snakes! Look at the snakes!’”

Snakes have many meanings from Biblical (Adam and Eve) to historical representations of fertility and life (rebirth, transformation, immortality, and healing).

QUESTIONS:

A) What do you think the snakes in these scenes symbolize?

B) Do you think another creature could’ve been used to instill fear? Which would you choose?



2. Aside from being a symbol of hope and a link to civilization, was there any other significance to the fire?



3. From CliffsNotes on Golding's Lord of the Flies:
In chapter 3, Piggy asked the boys "How can you expect to be rescued if you don't put first things first and act proper?”

QUESTION: What does Piggy mean by "act proper?" Why does he feel acting properly will bring them success in being rescued? Contrast this sentiment to the actual reason a rescue ship spots their smoke signal.



4. Lord of the Flies reveals the nature that is the beast known as man. Funny enough, and certainly done on purpose, the characters who realize this first are Simon and Piggy, who are both killed.

Piggy: “I know there isn’t no beast—not with claws and all that, I mean—but I know there’s isn’t no fear, either […] unless [...] unless we get frightened of people.”

Simon: “Maybe, maybe there is a beast […] what I mean is…maybe it’s only us.”

QUESTION: Their statements foretold their fates and the fates of the other boys. When did you come to the conclusion that the biguns would become savages and Simon and Piggy would lose their lives? (Or did you at all? And what spurred that thought?)



5. Does the color of the boys' hair or their overall physical appearance have anything to do with the roles they take on?



6. Do you believe self-awareness, which is portrayed in Jack, is the only thing that keeps humans from a moral meltdown or makes us civilized?



7. Let’s discuss Piggy.

QUESTIONS:

A) What are your thoughts about how all the kids treated Piggy, teasing him, name-calling, not letting him speak, and essentially treating him like the pigs they hunted?

B) This story was published in 1954. If the author wrote it today, do you think they would’ve respected Piggy (the “fat boy” among them) more, or no?



8. The writer was British and served in WWII. If this is an allegory of the world as he saw it or experienced in some way, do think what is happening in our world currently is a similar reflection of today's society slipping back to the primal dark psyche that resides in all humans?



9. Is the author spinning a cautionary tale about just how close the idea of civilization is to coming undone, by way of the conk and assemblies no longer being able to keep order?



10. The littlest boys in this story were neglected by the bigger boys. The biguns even joke about killing a litttleun in a “game” and giving them to the beast.

QUESTION: If set in present time, do you think the bigger boys would act this way toward the smaller kids?



11. Why was the only female presence in the story a mother pig who's slaughtered in a very disturbing way?



12. I read an all-female remake of Lord of the Flies is underway (a film).

QUESTIONS:

A) Do you think this concept would work with girls?

B) How differently or similarly do you think girls would adapt to life stranded on an island?


message 2: by Chrys (new)

Chrys Fey (chrysfey) A few of my answers to kick things off:

1. A) The snakes could possibly symbolize the children themselves. They become quite agonized from that moment forward. But I think the snakes really represent their fear in a physical state.

B) Hmm... spiders? I know many people are afraid of spiders, but I still think snakes just have that history of being bad...and the way they move, kill, and eat is pretty creepy.

2. Fire can bring pain and death, so it could've been foretelling the deaths and destruction to come, with the little boy with the scarred face dying in the fire and later the boys setting fire to the island to trap Ralph.

4. I came to the conclusion the bigger boys would become savages pretty early in the story. They just all seemed to want to rebel.

5. Jack's a red-head. Red symbolisms anger. He becomes very angry with Ralph. Red is also the color of blood, and he rather enjoys killing...

10. I see how wonderful my nephews are to smaller kids, so I can't imagine them acting in the same way the big kids in this story do.

12. I also can't imagine that girls would become so vicious. Yes, they can be quite brutal, but I suppose I harbor faith that girls aren't as inclined to violence and murder. Is it possible? Certainly. In the right circumstances. I just can't picture a group of girls acting like Jack and the other boys who turn savage.


message 3: by Toi, Book Club Admin (new)

Toi Thomas (toithomas) | 151 comments I like your point about spiders. I hadn't considered that. That island was probably swarming with them, nothing like what they would have seen in England. But, I guess snakes do have a more daunting history.

I also like your point about red being the color of blood. I hadn't considered that either. And yes, he does quite enjoy killing.

Depending on the time period in which the story is told, I think an all-girl version could be just as tragic, but in very different ways.

Great starter discussion. I'll post my responses shortly.


message 4: by Chrys (new)

Chrys Fey (chrysfey) Toi wrote: "That island was probably swarming with them, nothing like what they would have seen in England."

That gets me thinking about the lack of other animals, insects, etc. in the story. I don't recall a mention of birds or even fish. Just pigs and the imaginary snakes they were afraid of. If I wrote a story set so much in the outdoors, there'd be ants, gnats, mosquitos, real snakes, birds, fish, etc.


message 5: by Toi, Book Club Admin (new)

Toi Thomas (toithomas) | 151 comments Chrys wrote: "That gets me thinking about the lack of other animals, insects, etc. in the story."

Another great point. There were several passages mentioning the heat, but none talked about itchiness from the sand or sand crabs nipping at their toes. They didn't complain about flies at all, yet the flies show up long enough to swarm the pig head. And what about bats? With all the fruit the kids were eating, there had to be fruit and or insect bats coming out every night.


message 6: by Toi, Book Club Admin (new)

Toi Thomas (toithomas) | 151 comments For those of you who loved this story, please note that I did not. I’m glad that you enjoyed it and hope that you aren’t too put off by my lack of enjoyment, which is reflected in my responses to the questions.

2. In this story, I feel that fire becomes the universal equalizer. It has the potential to get the boys rescued, it keeps them warm at night, and it cooks their food. It can also destroy everything around them. It had already burned part of the forest and soon it becomes a weapon.

Many say that our intelligence is what makes us human and our advancements are what keep us civilized. I think the fire represents a cautionary theme. Gunpowder existed for a long time, only to be used in celebrations, and then one day it was weaponized….

4. I didn’t see Simon’s death coming, but I knew Piggy was either “not going to make it” or was going to be greatly hurt. When I read this book for the first time, I had no idea it would be so tragically violent. I thought that if a character died, it would be a sad or angry accident. The deaths in this story were all madness. I figured the boys would turn savage at some point after they burned part of the jungle.

5. I thought it was interesting that the struggle for power occurs between the two tallest boys. It’s as if none of the other characters even considered that they could be leaders. In stereotypical form, I also noticed that the hero of the story is handsome and blonde while the villain is a redhead. The quiet, and ignored voices of reason, comes from two oddball characters, as far as their looks or mannerisms are concerned. These seem to be classic, and somewhat overused, hero and villain tropes.

7. A) I didn’t like the treatment of Piggy one bit, but I would have been able to tolerate it more had there some revelation concerning his treatment being wrong or bad. Even though Ralph eventually recognizes that maybe he should have listened to Piggy a few times, he never expresses that to him or any of the other characters. He does actually once tell Piggy he should be leader because he’s smart, but this seems to be more of an act of desperation to not be responsible anymore. He doesn’t want to be in a position of authority and will pass the mantle on to anyone, Piggy just happens to be there.

B) Yes and no. Kids are kids, and they can be cruel, but I don’t see an entire community of boys rallying to pick on this one kid. In a modern adaptation of this story, it’s likely that Simon and, perhaps, some other unnamed boys would have befriended Piggy and related to him as an “underdog”, “geek”, or “outsider”. I think the division of communities among the boys would have been more complex, not just littleuns, biguns, and hunters. There would have been more variety, including some characters with strong religious convictions (whatever religion the author chooses), which did not exist in this story.

10. No. Bullies will always exist where there is a struggle for power, but I see kids interact all the time. Even when older kids are annoyed by little ones, they aren’t cruel or negligent for no reason. I don’t see a group of older kids ignoring a group of younger kids in a situation like this. If anything, they’d be trying to mold the younger ones to their liking. They’d be looking after them so they could turn them into hunters or whatever you call the boys who didn’t hunt.

11. I have no idea why there are no girls in this story. Maybe it was improper for girls to travel with boys. I will say though, that I thought the female pig’s slaughter was a bit morbidly sexual. It’s still a little too disturbing for me to talk about. Didn’t care for that one bit.

12. A) I think the story concept works. It’s a good idea, but how it comes about is the question of debate.

B) I think the time period and culture in which the story is told would have a huge difference on how an all-girl version of this story would play out. Since girls aren’t always provided the best education or aren’t always allowed to be part of society, the population on the island, may or may not be well informed or aware enough to make an interesting story. So many factors to consider…
--
On a personal note, I had a real issue with this author depicting the savage transformation as happening when the boys cover and or painted their bodies. I thought this was a cultural misinterpretation. Seeing as how the kids were on a hot island with little clothing, it would have made sense for them to cover their bodies with mud from time to time to keep their skin from burning. And where did this paint come from? You mean to tell me that these kids have the skill-set to develop body paint from natural resources but they can’t remain civilized?

The hunters begin to develop rituals and chants that lead them further into savagery but the others do nothing. Really? I find it odd that other rituals weren’t developed on the island outside the failed assemblies. None of the kids developed games, came up with fruit gathering rituals or routines; heck, I never once heard the choir sing (maybe they did once and I just blocked it out, out of frustration). I just couldn’t wrap my head around this.

If you’re interested, here’s my 3-star review: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 7: by Chrys (new)

Chrys Fey (chrysfey) The slaughter of the female pig was morbidly sexual for young boys. It really did make me uncomfortable, especially when they thought it was hilarious and didn’t even think twice that they murdered a female pig that was also a mother and had babies. It gave me the creeps for sure.

As for why there were no girls, I came to the conclusion that they were from an all-boy school.

That’s very true about the time period if an all-female remake is done. If it’s in this same time period, I don’t think they’d fair very well. They’d be more pampered, innocent, and not as capable. And for that reason, I don’t think very violent. If it’s set in a modern time, I think at least some of the girls will be savvy and know how to survive.

Wow. I didn’t realize that about the face paint until you said that. There is no mention of where this face paint comes from. Did they mash berries? Use charcoal and water? Or just mud? You make a very good point about how they could make face paint but weren’t very capable or creative anywhere else. Except when it came to killing....


message 8: by Elias (new)

Elias McClellan | 3 comments I believe Piggy and Simon are the civility, sensitivity, and conscience that are first casualties of war. As for whether Piggy would be treated better in an updated version, just google "Lord of the Flies Female Remake." The fire, though, oh the fire. It's the power that men strive for, the ultimate weapon of fear. Great topic, btw. And, fwiw, I hated this book as well, Ms. Thomas. It did give me a great primer for dealing with incivility in life, though.


message 9: by Chrys (new)

Chrys Fey (chrysfey) Elias wrote: "As for whether Piggy would be treated better in an updated version, just google "Lord of the Flies Female Remake.""

Simone was my favorite character...the loner. I hoped he wasn't going nutty, and then I was upset when he was killed.

I have heard about a female remake, which is actually one of the questions in the discussion, ;) but I didn't read anything about whether or not a character like Piggy would be treated better or worse in this remake, or any other remake. I'll have to take a look.

Thanks for contributing to our discussion, Elia!


message 10: by Juneta, Book Club Moderator (new)

Juneta Key | 81 comments I really did not like this concept either Toi. In fact, I could not get through the book so bought the study summary to remind myself what the story was about. I read it in school and remember hating it. My feelings were not that strong now but I found it depressive so opt not to force myself through that at this time. The study was not so bad but I found it actually interesting in reading in that dissected way.

1, A) What do you think the snakes in these scenes symbolize? I think the snakes were there to instill a creepy slithering fear that grows slowly and is unpredictable. Even the way snakes move, they have a quiet, insidious way of invasion which marks the overall way the boys revert to the primal behavior.

B) Do you think another creature could’ve been used to instill fear? Which would you choose? I think snakes were the best pick because I think it was also an overshadow to the overall change that would dominate and end the story. Insidious.

2. The fire was an essential survival tool. I agree with both Chyrs and Toi's take on it. The very thing that could aid them could also destroy them and is used as a tool of torture and death to one.

3. QUESTION: What does Piggy mean by "act proper?" Why does he feel acting properly will bring them success in being rescued?
The acting proper is a product of conditioning within any society and civilization in general. Within those parameters then that expectation is reasonable and expected. However, they are no longer within society but in a wild and harsh exacting environment. Piggy did not understand how this change the rules of living and survival yet.

Although intellectually I understood the story I could not relate to it and was repulsed at the idea they would degenerate in such a way, even though I got the psychology of it and it was well written. Toi made some good points about the inconsistency in some of the storytelling.

This book, even the premise gets a strong reaction from me. I want nothing to do with it. I think the message and outlook depressing or maybe I think that because I see some reality in it. You guys made some great points and insights.


message 11: by Toi, Book Club Admin (new)

Toi Thomas (toithomas) | 151 comments Elias wrote: "I believe Piggy and Simon are the civility, sensitivity, and conscience that are first casualties of war. As for whether Piggy would be treated better in an updated version, just google "Lord of th..."

I like your point here. If you think in terms of war, Simon and Piggy, representing civility and conscience, are the first casualties.


message 12: by Toi, Book Club Admin (new)

Toi Thomas (toithomas) | 151 comments Chrys wrote: "Simone was my favorite character...the loner. I hoped he wasn't going nutty, and then I was upset when he was killed."

There was one point in the story where it seemed, to me, that Simon might be having a seizure, the way he just falls to the ground and stares off into space. I've seen this at my job, but I could be wrong. Still, it fits with my theory of inferiority. I can't prove that Simon has an ailment, but it seems like the author made a point to kill off the physically odd or weak characters.


message 13: by Toi, Book Club Admin (new)

Toi Thomas (toithomas) | 151 comments Juneta wrote: "The acting proper is a product of conditioning within any society and civilization in general..."

I liked your point about acting proper. I somehow forgot to address this question myself. I also felt as though Piggy thought that if the boys good "act proper" or orderly, it would somehow get them rescued quicker. Which, the fire did go out that one time a ship passed in the distance; perhaps this was foreshadowing.


message 14: by Christine (new)

Christine Rains (christinerains) 1. A) I agree that the snakes do symbolize fear. Their projection of their fears would come in a way they think what might be lurking in a jungle.

B) Spiders would be interesting. Maybe bats.

2. I like Toi's answer to this question. Fire is the universal equalizer. It is life, power, and death.

4. Since this was my second time reading the book, I knew the fates of the boys and what would happen.

5. It is a standard symbol that red does symbolize anger. So that works for Jack. And Ralph had very clear eyes.

7. A) I did not like how Piggy was treated at all. And Ralph was so oblivious to how poorly he treated him. I'm unsure if Golding believed that's really how kids acted, if that was his experience, but the majority of kids these days (in my experience) do not act that way. Jack and his group were bullies, and since little kids want to do what the big kids do, this had them all treating Piggy poorly.

B) I do think Piggy would have gotten more respect. Bullying is really frowned upon these days, and there's a big movement to include everyone. Intelligence is more respected.

8. I do think society goes in cycles. We must remember our history and learn from our mistakes, or we'll keep repeating them. Yet if we're led by leaders like Jack and his hunters, we'll just keep falling back.

10. No, I don't think the bigger kids would act that way toward the little ones at all. My son is an only child, and he's caring and nurturing to smaller children. I didn't have to teach him that. Same with all the children I know. None set out to tease or torment smaller kids.

11. I thought the scene horrible in its symbolism. The destruction of the female, the nurturer, compassion, and empathy. I tried to remind myself this story was written decades ago, and it was normal for boys to go to one school and girls to another. Yet even then, the brutality of the scene might have said something about the author more than anything else.

12. A) No. I cannot imagine it with girls.
B) I cannot imagine any children acting like that.


message 15: by Jennifer (last edited Mar 26, 2018 08:44AM) (new)

Jennifer Worrell (jenniferworrell) Before I get to the questions, I'll put in my two cents on the book itself. I don't see a lot of comments on the ending, my least favorite part. It felt brought up short, and incongruous with the rest of the story. Things were getting worse, I had no hope of rescue, then suddenly there's a captain wondering why they didn't behave better and ushering them to a boat. I could argue that it was symbolic—leave unskilled people alone long enough and they find reasons to become violent because power's all they have—but it was so abrupt I was unsatisfied. Golding alludes to a war or apocalyptic event that goes down, but the captain seemed unfazed, and I wondered why he'd toss that delicious foreboding off that way.

The other thing I wasn't crazy about was the meticulous description of setting. I don't enjoy reading long descriptions of what's to the left and right of every leaf. Since I have a hard time picturing this stuff in general, I skimmed a little bit with these passages.

Otherwise, I rather liked the book.


message 16: by Jennifer (last edited Mar 26, 2018 08:51AM) (new)

Jennifer Worrell (jenniferworrell) 1A) I took them to symbolize the insidious evil that was wrapping around them, their own dark sides coming out in ways they wouldn't in the light of day (polite society).

2. I'm echoing everyone else: life-giving force that was eventually used to exert power and cause suffering instead of good. Also, a simple thing that couldn't be maintained; still working out what he was trying to say there. It's on the edges of my brain.

3. Since Piggy's so hell bent on being reunited with, and getting praise from, adults, I took "acting proper" to mean that he wanted to prove he's a good egg that knows how to follow rules. When the grown-ups come back, he can point to himself as being a big boy. I could be talking out of my ass.

4. I vaguely knew what happened to Piggy ahead of time, so this is a cheat. But when the boys tied down one of their own—was it Roger?—to "play" hunt, and "Roger" freaked out and believed he actually would die, I knew someone was going to die violently.

5. I honestly didn't notice, except the hair in their eyes constantly near the end made me associate it with lying, hiding, mistrustfulness/dishonesty. I was constantly wondering why, if they could kill pigs, they couldn't shave their heads with the same tools. When Ralph's trying to get away from his assassins, I thought, that whole time, there really was no way to hide otherwise. That was their sheath.

6. I don't think it was going that way. I fully expected the majority of kids to either die or become passive slaves if the ending hadn't come about the way it did.

7A) I thought this was a rather brilliant connection. I also enjoyed poor nutty Simon talking to the pig's head. Since it was mentioned that Ralph thought Piggy should be the leader, that pig's head was giving orders; another symbolic tie-in. Piggy was also the most motherly of the boys. I loved that disturbing image of the severed head and how horribly wrong everything was going in such a short time.

7B) Nope, people are even bigger jerks now, from what I've seen. It might take them a little longer.

8. Absolutely. Reading this was uncannily great timing. I often feel like we're reverting to a primordial state. That's probably all I should say on that subject...

9. I think so; I also like the disintegration from such an important tool to barely more than a trinket.

10. I think they might. Gallows humor has always been a thing.

11. Not sure about this one. Honestly I didn't think much about it while I was reading.

12A) I think it could work, but I worry it will descend into a gore-fest to show girlpower. I won't get into my diatribe about remakes. LOL

12B) I think girls would have the same power struggles, if not worse. But I also think they'd be all about shelters and order and less about hunting and climbing over each other to be "king".


message 17: by Chrys (new)

Chrys Fey (chrysfey) Christine wrote: "Since this was my second time reading the book, I knew the fates of the boys and what would happen."

This was my second time reading it, too. The first time was in high school, but I forgot that Simon died. I only remembered that piggy died, except I couldn't remember how. I thought he was the one stabbed to death but that was Simon.

How Ralph treated Piggy really bothered me, too. I love your answer to 7 B with the anti-bullying movement. Good point. I think a lot of kids are standing up for each other nowadays and standing against bullies.

I can't imagine children acting like this either. *shivers*


message 18: by Chrys (new)

Chrys Fey (chrysfey) Jennifer wrote: "I don't see a lot of comments on the ending, my least favorite part. It felt brought up short, and incongruous with the rest of the story. "

I agree that the ending was sudden and abrupt. I didn't really like it either. It seemed like an easy way out for the characters, especially Ralph.


In reply to your second comment:

"the insidious evil that was wrapping around them"

Oh that's very good!

And very insightful with their hair and how it was in their eyes all the time. That could definitely be a symbolism for being blind...blinded with hatred, rage, blood-lust....

For an all-female remake, I do imagine they'd make it more gory to prove that girls can be just as savage, or more so. In my opinion, it's wrong to represent girlpower in that way, but I know Hollywood would go there.

"Since it was mentioned that Ralph thought Piggy should be the leader, that pig's head was giving orders; another symbolic tie-in."

I did not make that connection. Wow! And yes, Piggy was the most motherly. He was the only one looking after the little boys, so it is very symbolic what they did to the mother pig and to Piggy...the only "mother" figures in the story.



Hate to say it, but I wonder if the author had mother issues.

Anyone else wonder the same thing? For some reason I feel there has to be more of a connection to the author's life other than the time period and his expereince with war. Then again...maybe not. (Though we'll probably never know for sure.)


message 19: by Jennifer (new)

Jennifer Worrell (jenniferworrell) Yes, the easy out. Like all of a sudden it was just a game. "Only two"...maybe that was the symbolism there? That men fight in war as though it's just a game? But that was a lot of pages for a rather glib final statement.

Ha! Interesting point on the mother issues. It did remind me a little of Peter Pan & the lost boys, always playing with swords and fighting pirates, yet constantly talking about finding a mother.

I do love how much symbolism is going on in this book. Really glad I read it.


message 20: by Chrys (new)

Chrys Fey (chrysfey) Jennifer wrote: "I do love how much symbolism is going on in this book. Really glad I read it. ."

I'm glad you enjoyed reading it. Although it can be a tough read for some, and readers either love it or hate it, the reason we were reading it was to learn about symbolism and see how an author worked symbolism into a story, and this book is an excellent example.


message 21: by Jennifer (new)

Jennifer Worrell (jenniferworrell) I think I might skip Save the Cat (my husband is doing a scathing review on it, so I'm biased LOL) but looking forward to the next one. I loved reading everyone else's interpretation! <3


message 22: by Chrys (new)

Chrys Fey (chrysfey) LOL! That’s okay. I’ve heard great things about it and many writers I know are praising it, but I’ve seen negative reviews, too, so it’ll be interesting to see how I feel about it.


message 23: by Jennifer (new)

Jennifer Worrell (jenniferworrell) I was thinking of the ending more. Honestly, I was looking forward to Ralph getting offed. It made me wonder if that wasn't the author's intention, showing that the reader is just as much a savage as the characters. Did Ralph really die? That's perhaps the reason for the abrupt, calm ending? Maybe instead of angels and God and heaven, he sees their awaited saviors: grown-ups, the fabled ship, rescue. Or I could have still been half asleep. LOL


message 24: by Liesbet (new)

Liesbet Collaert | 12 comments This is great discussion. As a Belgian, I think I read this book in high school as well, for English class. Since it was my third language back then, most of it was most likely lost, especially the symbolism. I don’t remember liking it back then and I remembered Piggy would die and a head on a stick.

This time around, I was hoping it wasn’t Piggy’s head on a stick the whole time I read the book, until finding out it wasn’t. Phew. That being said, the scene with that sow being killed (while having babies) was disturbing. Again, I did not like the book one bit.

It annoyed me that there were details about the jungle and vegetation, but little information about other facets, like mentioned by others above. Part of it was written in the simple words of the children, but then, other times these boys were able to hunt and kill a pig, and start a fire relatively easy. Those are skills I was surprised young boys could muster.

The most disturbing thing to me, is that I could totally imagine our society turning into anarchy and madness like this, because common sense, care, compassion and smarts are thrown out of the window. Ignorance, superiority (power) and fear will always be present. People like Jack and Ralph exist in any country, within any culture, and during any time. Scary, but true...


message 25: by Roland (new)

Roland Clarke (goodreadscomroland_clarke) | 21 comments The discussion is raising some interesting points. However, I will have to delay my contribution until the end of April (when the Blogging from A to Z Challenge is calming down.) Briefly, I've been fascinated by Lord of the Flies for decades ever since I met Ralph or rather the actor that played him in Peter Brook's 1963 B&W film. He had some interesting insights into 'living' the book given how the film was made.


message 26: by Chrys (new)

Chrys Fey (chrysfey) Liesbet wrote: "This is great discussion. As a Belgian, I think I read this book in high school as well, for English class. Since it was my third language back then, most of it was most likely lost, especially the..."

This book definitely raises strong reaction. I'm glad it was chosen, even if it made many of us uncomfortable. It's creating a fascinating discussion. That's for sure. :)


message 27: by Chrys (new)

Chrys Fey (chrysfey) Roland wrote: "The discussion is raising some interesting points. However, I will have to delay my contribution until the end of April (when the Blogging from A to Z Challenge is calming down.) Briefly, I've been..."

Wow! I'd love to hear what the actor had to say.


message 28: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca Douglass (rdouglass) | 31 comments This is a book that I suspect I should re-read. It was one of a number of rather depressing books we had to read in Jr. High, a pedagogic choice I still think was misguided, if not actually dangerous. We were finding out enough in our everyday lives about the evil that lies in humans, and the crap that can come down on you out of nowhere.

So my view of the book is warped through the lens of 12-year-old depression.


message 29: by Chrys (new)

Chrys Fey (chrysfey) This is a depressing book. I was mostly recovered from my depression when I read it this time, but it certainly impacted me and my thoughts in negative ways. I felt it and sped through the story so I wouldn’t have to read it for long. I know others had the same problems.


message 30: by Roland (new)

Roland Clarke (goodreadscomroland_clarke) | 21 comments Basically, the late James Aubrey - Ralph - said the experience was very intense and real; plus he wanted to be Jack not Ralph. (Maybe that was why he was so good as Gavin in Bouquet of Barbed Wire.)


message 31: by Roland (new)

Roland Clarke (goodreadscomroland_clarke) | 21 comments Belatedly adding my thoughts to the discussion with this review that I posted on my website - some of the questions are answered in the review:

https://rolandclarke.com/2018/05/31/l...


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