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Writer's Circle > Reviews & Ratings on Goodreads

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message 1: by Liz (new)

Liz Cowan (jalizcowangmailcom) | 7 comments Many of us have numerous reviews and ratings on Goodreads, but they do not appear on Amazon.
I appreciate everyone who reads my books, but as an author trying to get my name and work noticed, it would be great if we could have a blast message from Goodreads.
The message would ask readers to be sure and post their ratings and reviews on Amazon.
According to Goodreads, they do not migrate reviews and ratings at this time.
What are your thoughts on this? Would appreciate feedback.
Thank you.
Liz Cowan


message 2: by T. (new)

T. Renee | 18 comments I would love if my reviews would transfer to Amazon. I think it's weird that they don't since I read somewhere that Amazon has an affiliation with GR (I'm not sure if that's true) but even if it isn't, I think as a platform for authors and readers, to help promote the numerous authors on this site they should invest the effort to transfer the reviews which in turn would (hopefully) produce more sales and getting more people talking back here on GR about the books they purchased. I mean there's Amazon buttons on GR to make purchases, why not reviews on Amazon that follow back to GR. It seems a little lopsided, I do hope it changes.


message 3: by Liz (new)

Liz Cowan (jalizcowangmailcom) | 7 comments T. wrote: "I would love if my reviews would transfer to Amazon. I think it's weird that they don't since I read somewhere that Amazon has an affiliation with GR (I'm not sure if that's true) but even if it is..."

Perhaps if enough authors press GR to make that needed change, it will happen. But, enough authors must ask them to make a difference in current policy.


message 4: by Caven (new)

Caven Tootell | 24 comments Couldn't agree more!
Have signed up as a Reviewer with http://google.us9.list-manage.com/sub...
Who says he will ensure these reviews are posted on Amazon


message 5: by David (new)

David Dennington | 3 comments T. wrote: "I would love if my reviews would transfer to Amazon. I think it's weird that they don't since I read somewhere that Amazon has an affiliation with GR (I'm not sure if that's true) but even if it is..."
I absolutely agree! The total number of ratings and reviews would double in many cases.


message 6: by Liz (new)

Liz Cowan (jalizcowangmailcom) | 7 comments Caven wrote: "Couldn't agree more!
Have signed up as a Reviewer with http://google.us9.list-manage.com/sub...
Who says he will ensure these reviews are posted on Amazon"


Thanks for the tip, I signed up as well. Many of the books listed are available on Kindle Unlimited as well, so it is still free.


message 7: by Liz (new)

Liz Cowan (jalizcowangmailcom) | 7 comments David wrote: "T. wrote: "I would love if my reviews would transfer to Amazon. I think it's weird that they don't since I read somewhere that Amazon has an affiliation with GR (I'm not sure if that's true) but ev..."

From what Goodreads told me, if enough author request such review and rating transfers, it will happen.


message 8: by Mellie (new)

Mellie (mellie42) | 618 comments Caven wrote: "Have signed up as a Reviewer with http://google.us9.list-manage.com/sub...
Who says he will ensure these reviews are posted on Amazon"


Be aware that guy is a spammer and his "review service" violates the TOS of both Amazon and Goodreads. GR staff are hard at work deleting his spam and multiple fake accounts he keeps creating.

It doesn't bother me where readers want to post their review, if they decide to take the time to leave one.


message 9: by Caven (new)

Caven Tootell | 24 comments Liz & David - OK then - should we start some sort of 'group' email petition to request this be set up between GR and Amazon? What would be the best way to approach it? Individual posts in which discussion or emails?


message 10: by Caven (new)

Caven Tootell | 24 comments A.W. Thanks - I will investigate - was intending to post my own review on Amazon as it was. Can you point to some evidence on this chap's intent as a spammer please? Must admit have had no 'unwanted' emails and he has delivered what he promised - to date.
Cheers


message 11: by Alexandra (last edited Mar 21, 2018 02:37PM) (new)

Alexandra | 374 comments Liz wrote: "From what Goodreads told me, if enough author request such review and rating transfers, it will happen."

That's quite concerning, as reviews belong to the reviewers. Currently reviewers have the choice to cross post reviews if they want. It'd be very problematic to do it without users being able to choose, and without their consent.

If GR started displaying my reviews on Amazon automatically I would delete them. And unfortunately that would then remove the very reason I post them here in the first place. Which in turn would remove a great deal of what I enjoy doing here, discussing books with other readers - most especially those on my friend list.

So, authors wanting this should consider the fact that such a thing would result in some users choosing to not post reviews on GR at all, when they do so now. Rather than having more reviews on Amazon, you could end up with less on GR.

Some users would like the option of having their reviews automatically posted for them on Amazon as well, which I would presume would require them to link their accounts. But that is quite different than GoodReads doing it unilaterally simply because enough authors want it.

There are also valid concerns about the fact that the formatting and TOS for reviews on GR is quite different that for Amazon. And many users would not like to see GR change it's reviews to the more restrictive Amazon requirements and function.

What I would like to see is for authors to stop thinking consumer reviews somehow are for them, or, as it seems in this case, belong to them. They are not yours, they belong to the people who have posted them. And it's what they think about posting them also to Amazon that matters. I have to presume if they wanted those reviews to also be posted to Amazon they would have done so.

I am against any change which results in removing user choice and user control over their own content.


message 12: by Mellie (new)

Mellie (mellie42) | 618 comments Caven wrote: "Can you point to some evidence on this chap's intent as a spammer please? "

I'm assuming you don't hang out in GR groups much? He has been spamming multiple threads and groups for months, hence why his accounts keep getting deleted by GR staff. They delete one account and he pops up again with a new one, spamming and linking to his services that violate TOS.

There have been threads where others more knowledgable than I have pulled apart his "services" and shown how they violate TOS. At the end of the day it's up to each author to investigate such things, it's your KDP account that will get banned if Amazon detects wrong doing.

Personally I ignore reviews, they're not for me but for other readers. I prefer to invest my time and energy in improving my craft and generating sales, that way reviews look after themselves.


message 13: by Alexandra (last edited Mar 21, 2018 03:02PM) (new)

Alexandra | 374 comments A.W. wrote: "Caven wrote: "Can you point to some evidence on this chap's intent as a spammer please? "

I'm assuming you don't hang out in GR groups much? He has been spamming multiple threads and groups for mo..."


In addition to this I'd advise any author considering signing up for any sort of review service to verify the service was in complete compliance with Amazon and GoodReads TOS prior to doing business with them, and do so by checking the information for both authors and readers, and independently verifying what they say using Amazon and GoodReads TOS info. In other words, don't believe they are in compliance with TOS simply because they state they are.


message 14: by Caven (new)

Caven Tootell | 24 comments OK thanks for the advice. Will check more deeply in future. Though have not heard from him since he provided the eBook for review.
Cheers


message 15: by Alexandra (new)

Alexandra | 374 comments Caven wrote: "OK thanks for the advice. Will check more deeply in future. Though have not heard from him since he provided the eBook for review.
Cheers"


I can tell you right off the bat some of why this person is violating Amazon TOS, or reviews posted through this person's service.

"For each book, you will either get a free review copy or a coupon code to buy the book off Amazon"

Amazon does not allow reviewers to be provided anything other than a free book. Including coupon codes. Coupon codes are considered financial compensation, disallowing the review. Additionally providing a coupon code facilitates faking a Verified Purchase tag. So, double whammy - paid for review plus review manipulation.


message 16: by Alexandra (last edited Mar 21, 2018 05:39PM) (new)

Alexandra | 374 comments Liz wrote: "I appreciate everyone who reads my books, but as an author trying to get my name and work noticed, it would be great if we could have a blast message from Goodreads.
The message would ask readers to be sure and post their ratings and reviews on Amazon. "


I highly doubt GR would ever ask readers to "be sure and post their ratings and reviews on Amazon". That's too close to sounding like a demand or requirement - something that would violate Amazon TOS. Not to mention pretty crappy Public Relations, to be so bossy to customers paying money for their books. Don't know about you, but I don't work for GR or Amazon. I am a customer of Amazon, and I pretty much expect Amazon to treat me like one. (That's how I feel about authors whose books I read too, BTW). GoodReads does request reviews be posted, for books won via their Giveaways.

Consumer reviews on Amazon would not gain your books notice, because someone would have to first look at the book page to even see them. You'd need to gain your books notice first somehow for people to view the book page.

Reviews on Amazon are something shoppers may look at after a book has already gained their notice. So, if your goal is to gain your books notice you should be looking at marketing and advertising, not consumer reviews.

As I stated before, some users would like their reviews to be automatically posted also to Amazon. These users tend to be those that are already posting in both places though. And it'd be fine, as long as it's a user option, not a requirement or automatically done whether we want it or not. However, there are very real issues regarding the differences between reviews here and reviews on Amazon, and many GR users would be very unhappy to have GR changed to restrict things we're able to do in reviews now.


message 17: by Liz (new)

Liz Cowan (jalizcowangmailcom) | 7 comments The purpose of reviews on Amazon is that after 100 reviews, Amazon takes notice of the author and promotes the book.

I am just a writer who would like people to find my works. I write because the Muse compels me, even in my sleep. Writing is similar to baking something yummy to please our loved ones. I write and hope my readers are pleased with the results. I am proud of my work, as most authors are. Success to me is entertaining and pleasing my readers.
I never meant that GR should demand reviewers to post on Amazon but rather a gentle reminder. That is not offensive. Most people read the books and do not always realize they can help the authors they enjoy reading. It is like a virtual thank you kiss on the author's cheek for what they wrote.


message 18: by Mellie (new)

Mellie (mellie42) | 618 comments Liz wrote: "The purpose of reviews on Amazon is that after 100 reviews, Amazon takes notice of the author and promotes the book."

That's not true. It's a false meme that was started a few years ago by a service selling reviews (which happens to violate Amazon's TOS).

Amazon's algorithms are driven by sales NOT reviews. If you want Amazon to feature your book in emails to customers then sell more books, reviews have nothing to do with it.

Paying services to post hundreds of fake ratings to your book will do nothing to aid its discovery by genuine readers. Instead of chasing reviews, it would be a better investment of your time to work on improving your craft, polishing your books and concentrating on sales.


message 19: by Alexandra (last edited Mar 21, 2018 06:50PM) (new)

Alexandra | 374 comments Liz wrote: "The purpose of reviews on Amazon is that after 100 reviews, Amazon takes notice of the author and promotes the book."

That might be why you want more reviews posted to Amazon, but that's not the purpose of reviews. And though I don't doubt you've heard that Amazon promotes books after 100 reviews, that's not actually true. Amazon promotes books when they've been paid to (advertising), and during daily/monthly specials, and when books are best sellers.

Can you imagine what it'd look like if Amazon promoted books with 100 reviews or more? You know who would be on it? All the big names, trade pubbed books, tons of them. Years and years of them. Many from authors who are dead. The little guys would get lost in all that noise.

You might not be aware of this, but Amazon also does not allow readers to just post a rating, with no text. GR does, and some of your books have over 100 ratings here, but none have nearly that many reviews. Even if reviews automatically were posted from GR to Amazon, those that are only ratings/no review wouldn't, because they don't meet Amazon's criteria.

I sympathize with wanting your books to gain notice. But consumer reviews don't do that, as people won't see them on Amazon until/unless they've already gotten to the book page. And for that they need to have already noticed your book.

There are ways to gain notice for your books, advertising, marketing, promotions. There are other threads in groups here where authors talk about ways that work and ways that don't. You might consider looking around and getting some advice from other authors who can share advice and ideas about that. Not all of them are expensive.

"I never meant that GR should demand reviewers to post on Amazon but rather a gentle reminder." That is not offensive."

Well, I wouldn't call the phrasing you used a "gentle reminder" :) And readers really shouldn't be reminded to post a review, because they're under no obligation to do so. The idea a customer should be reminded to do something for the product seller is a bit offensive, yeah. To me it is. We're customers. A request is not offensive. But in my personal opinion even a request should only be done if the author has provided the reader with a free copy, not if the reader has purchased the book.

"Most people read the books and do not always realize they can help the authors they enjoy reading."

Consumer reviews aren't to help authors, they're for readers. And readers shouldn't be thinking of what helps authors, we're customers. Consumer reviews written to help the author is actually inserting a bias that entirely defeats the purpose of a consumer review - which is a consumer opinion of a product that is independent of bias for those who have a financial interest in that product.

The product seller has marketing, advertising and promotions to gain notice for their product, and give consumers whatever message about that product they want to give.

Consumers have consumer reviews. Consumer reviews are the independent voice of consumers. Where we get to express our opinions that is separate from any influence or bias for the seller.

Most readers have no interest in posting book reviews. They just don't. And that's perfectly fine.

Believe me, I help authors whose books I enjoy all the time, but that help is completely incidental to what I'm actually doing, which is sharing about books I've enjoyed with other readers.

"It is like a virtual thank you kiss on the author's cheek for what they wrote."

What do authors do to give readers a virtual thank you kiss on the cheek for buying their books and putting money in their pocket?


message 20: by Liz (new)

Liz Cowan (jalizcowangmailcom) | 7 comments A.W, & Alexandra, thank you for your explanations.

Of course, selling books helps and I do sell books at book signings, which I enjoy very much.

Appreciate the information.
Thanks to both of you


message 21: by Mellie (last edited Mar 21, 2018 07:40PM) (new)

Mellie (mellie42) | 618 comments Liz wrote: "Of course, selling books helps and I do sell books at book signings..."

If you want Amazon (or iTunes, Kobo, B&N or GP) to promote your book then you need to sell on that retailer's platform. Sales are what kick retailer algorithms into action. I'm scratching my head that you started this thread wanting GR ratings to migrate to Amazon to "get your work noticed" but that's not the purpose of consumer reviews. Ratings/reviews don't get your books noticed. If you want your book to appear when consumers are browsing then you need to improve your ranking. And you do that by selling books.

I would also suggest you stop paying whatever service you are using to post fake ratings and fake listopia votes for your books. The money would be better spent on legitimate advertising. Fake ratings on Goodreads won't do anything for your sales and it gives a bad impression to genuine readers when such things are so easy to spot.


message 22: by Marie Silk (new)

Marie Silk | 223 comments There's a lot of good advice here. Also, not sure if you are aware, but Amazon sends out review reminders.

Some authors like to include a line in the back matter of the book requesting that the reader leave a review. I'm not sure how much reminders and requests truly make a difference though. I ignore most of my emails from Amazon asking how many stars I would give the products I bought.


message 23: by Alexandra (new)

Alexandra | 374 comments Liz wrote: "A.W, & Alexandra, thank you for your explanations.

Of course, selling books helps and I do sell books at book signings, which I enjoy very much.

Appreciate the information.
Thanks to both of you"


You're welcome, I hope it was helpful :D


message 24: by Alexandra (new)

Alexandra | 374 comments Marie Silk wrote: "There's a lot of good advice here. Also, not sure if you are aware, but Amazon sends out review reminders.

Some authors like to include a line in the back matter of the book requesting that the r..."


Those aren't bad suggestions, and it is common. But personally it annoys me when I get to the end of a book and there's a note from the author asking for a review. As a customer I dislike that practice. But it's certainly true that many indie authors do it.


message 25: by Susanna - Censored by GoodReads (last edited Mar 21, 2018 09:37PM) (new)

Susanna - Censored by GoodReads (susannag) | 137 comments I don't see this happening. The review requirements differ, as does the rating scale.

Also, GR doesn't mass email us about major site wide changes, so I doubt they'd email us about it. A message banner on the home page (which a great many of us avoid these days, since its redesign to make it uglier and less useful) is probably the best you could hope for.

ETA: I choose not to review on Amazon, and if GR reviews were automatically transferred over there, I'd either quit leaving reviews here, or quit the site altogether.


message 26: by Mellie (new)

Mellie (mellie42) | 618 comments Marie wrote: "Some promotions sites won't promote books without so many reviews and on the rating stats."

The good sites (ones that deliver a decent ROI) don't have minimum review numbers or averages as they curate their lists and look at the quality of the book and the author's catalogue. Sites that have review requirements take all submissions, regardless of quality, and their ROI isn't anywhere near as good.

So many authors chase reviews saying "but I need reviews to advertise..." no, you don't. You don't need any reviews to advertise with FB, AMS or BB cpc ads. You don't need any reviews to entice readers to take a chance on your book by ensuring the cover grabs their attention and the blurb makes them want to click to read more.

Write a decent book. Deliver a polished, professional package and stop placing the responsibility for your sales on consumers leaving reviews.


message 27: by Alexandra (last edited Mar 22, 2018 04:38AM) (new)

Alexandra | 374 comments Marie wrote: "Alexandra wrote: "I would like to respond as an author. We work years writing books and earning small amounts of money. One thing that helps us with promotion is reader reviews.

Consumer reviews are NOT book promotion. Did you see that part I explained about how consumer reviews are independent consumer opinion? They are by consumers, for consumers. And if the consumer's opinion is that the book is complete garbage and no one should bother reading it, then that is what they should say.

Book promotion is entirely up to those with a financial interest in the product, and is entirely their responsibility. Book promotion is advertising and marketing. Consumer reviews are the voice of the consumer. The only place the consumer gets to have their say.

"They help other readers decide whether to read a book or not."

They can, sure. They are by consumers for consumers. NOT book promotion.

"Some promotions sites won't promote books without so many reviews and on the rating stats."

The fact that some promotion sites are too lazy to vet books themselves and shortcut that by using consumer opinion about books doesn't magically turn the voice of the consumer into marketing for the product seller. Nor does it give the product seller the right to attempt to hijack the voice of the consumer to turn it into just one more marketing tool.

Additionally, if some sites are looking to consumers to vet books for quality, that tells me they want honest consumer opinion, not book promotion.

Consumers don't lose their rights just because some promotional site somewhere does something.

"Reviews are a vital tool for authors to display their work to a possible reader."

No, they absolutely are not. Consumer reviews are not tools for the author. Consumer reviews are a vital part of consumer rights, giving us a voice that is completely divorced from all interest of the product seller/producer. Completely independent of promotion.

Consumer reviews are to help consumers.

"Why is it a bad thing to include the poor Joe writer and help sell their work? "

Because consumers have rights. Consumers get a voice. It's not the job of the consumer to help product sellers sell their products, nor is it the purpose of consumer reviews. In fact that is completely contrary to the entire purpose of consumer reviews.

Poor Joe's author's book might be crap. It might be poorly edited, poorly written, and full of typos. Or, it might be perfectly formatted and edited and completely tedious. Or, it may be so niche that it will only interest a very few. Or, it may be to some reader's taste and not others. Consumers get to express opinions about all this, their honest opinion. Not help poor Joe author sell his book. In fact they very well could help to not sell the book.

If authors subvert consumer reviews and pollute them into book promotion consumers have no voice and are effectively silenced. Turning customers into shills for product producers. And taking away the one place consumers can speak freely and independently about products to each other.

The interest of the product seller is to sell products. The interest of the consumer is to make purchasing decisions based on their criteria. To purchase products that fit their needs and preferences, and avoid purchasing products that do not. The two interests are adversarial.

For help promoting their books authors get marketing, advertising and their promotional efforts. Consumer reviews is a contrast and counter to this, not a part of it.

It actually boggles my mind this needs to be explained to anyone. It seems to me it'd be quite obvious to anyone who is a consumer, which has to be pretty much everyone in the Western world.

It also makes me wonder if such authors are also readers. Because it's hard for me to fathom when they are trying to decide on a book to buy that they want to read a bunch of book promotion written by people who want to help the author sell his/her book.

I will never understand why some authors think it's perfectly fine to not only insert themselves into a consumer to consumer dialog, but then insist that dialog be made to serve their interests, not the interests of the consumer. It's not only an issue of consumer rights, it's an issue of freedom of speech.

If you're thinking about buying a toaster online, think about what it would be like if all the "consumer reviews" about all the toasters were actually product promotion verbiage to help the product seller sell their products.

Cars, hotels, tvs, computers, furniture. Anything and everything you can think of. All you can find is product promotion, written to help sell the product. Maybe that will help people understand why consumers should actually get a say that is free of any influence or interest of those with a financial interest in the products. And why it's a very bad thing when producers and sellers want to convince people that the voice of the consumer is, and should be, product marketing.

Some authors think consumer reviews are, and should be product promotion. That their customers are obligated to assist them in selling their product. Those authors tend to tell their readers they shouldn't post a review that is less than four stars. Which is, again, silencing and subverting the voice of the consumer.

It's thinking that people pay money to the product seller to then promote the product for the seller. That's not how it works. If authors want people to promote their books then authors need to hire people to promote their books, not expect people to pay them to do it.

I've seen authors threaten to sue readers who posted a less than glowing review. I've seen readers attacked and harassed by authors for posting a less than glowing review - up to and including publicly posting information about their real names, where they live, places they frequent, names of their children, all in attempts to intimidate them into silence. Because these authors thought consumer reviews were book promotion.

I've seen good, honest, popular reviewers stop reviewing. I've seen many, many others stop reviewing books by indie authors. Because it just wasn't worth the hassle.

That is very, very bad for consumers.

If an author is lucky enough to have their book read by a reader that honestly enjoys it, great! However, any "help" the author may get from the reader freely and honestly expressing their opinion and sharing it with others is completely incidental, and not at all the actual purpose.

The idea that the people who pay money to purchase the author's books are marketers for the author and should be helping the author sell their books, is ludicrous. No, they are the author's customers, and authors should give them all rights and respect due to the customers of their business. Not think of them as unpaid (or reverse paying) employees.

And if indie authors want to know why it's so dang hard for them to get readers to read their books and post reviews they need look no further than all the indie authors who keep thinking consumer reviews are for authors. Because they are a huge part of the reason.


message 28: by Kim (new)

Kim author | 5 comments Thank you for this response!!! I have been fretting over reviews, or lack thereof, and felt as if I was doing something wrong. Your statement has provided a great deal of relief. I will continue focusing on the work and less on the review.

Blessings!


message 29: by Kathleen (new)

Kathleen Martin | 33 comments I would love to see my reviews posted on Amazon too. Thanks for bringing this to the public's attention.


message 30: by Richard (new)

Richard (smashed-rat-on-press) | 30 comments Minority report here, perhaps, but... I'm with Alexandra (above). As a book reviewer, I want to control where my reviews appear, so any kind of automatic push from GR to Amazon would be an unwelcome development. I don't think they'd really do that without permission and opt-in; and maybe they already have some such mechanism. I do not link this account to Amazon, and I started reviewing here before Amazon bought GR. I don't post reviews on 'Zon unless personally requested to do so by an author to whom I already feel sympathetic.


message 31: by Jaclyn (new)

Jaclyn Woods (jaclyn_w) | 417 comments Thanks for the interesting discussion here! I just want to add that Goodreads' and Amazon's review systems are still very separate and our reviews are all user-generated by Goodreads members.

You are, however, welcome to post excerpts from outside reviews on self-serve ads or giveaway descriptions to promote interest in your book. You can also post these reviews on your author blog for all your followers to see.


message 32: by Faith (new)

Faith Jones (havingfaith) | 61 comments I post reviews on Goodreads only nowadays. I used to have a book review blog but got swamped by direct requests (you have read one of my books, so can you review the other five?), being put on weekly circulation lists with fifty titles on each and also having my email address listed in directories of blogger/reviewers, where although it said 'Sci-fi reviews' the authors were always asking whether, even though it says that, would I make an exception and read their religious fantasy, murder horror or roller skate repair manual. As a supportive kind of personality, I took on too much and it swamped me. There are only so many books you can read and review in one year. I also took my profile picture down because I got approaches that were out of scope. I'm now able to read what I like without existential guilt that I owe an indie author a review, feeling pressure that they are expecting one and have had to wait. In summary, reviewers do give up and that's understandable because authors are desperate for their books to be read (also understandable). Incidentally, there is one book which I gave the lowest possible rating to and I now see that's been pushed closer to an average of 5, clearly by fake reviews, so can readers trust this system anyway?


Susanna - Censored by GoodReads (susannag) | 137 comments I think most users of this site are savvy enough to look at both the average rating, and how many ratings made up that average.

My suggestion to new users of this site is to "friend" people with similar literary taste, as well as actual friends here. Reviews from friends are listed first, and that average is given, too. That can be very useful.


message 34: by Richard (new)

Richard (smashed-rat-on-press) | 30 comments @Faith: ... got swamped by direct requests ... took on too much and it swamped me

One thing I've learned is "never volunteer in public"... LOL.


message 35: by Roxanne (new)

Roxanne Bland (roxanne2) | 18 comments I agree reader reviews are for other readers, not a marketing tool for authors. Yet reader reviews are still important. It's feedback for the author. I read all my reviews, good and bad, because they tell me something. A good review means I'm doing something right. A bad review (not the "you suck!" kind) can provide constructive criticism. It helps the author for readers to leave a review, but they shouldn't be forced to do it. And I see nothing wrong with an author asking a reader for a review, whether in print or in person. The author is only asking, after all. The reader can always choose to ignore the request. As for bloggers, I agree that it's so easy to get swamped. However, bloggers can always choose to add a note on their sites they have suspended review requests, or a note about what they will and will not review. If an author sends in a review request about a book in which the blogger has no interest, that's what the trash button is for and there's no requirement that the blogger respond if they decide not to review. Yes, authors can be a pushy bunch, but readers also have the power to push back.


message 36: by Mellie (new)

Mellie (mellie42) | 618 comments Roxanne wrote: "Yet reader reviews are still important. It's feedback for the author."

Reviews are not author feedback - they are customer opinions.

Personally I don't read reviews on my books. If I want feedback I seek it from my critique partners and editors.


message 37: by Jim (new)

Jim Vuksic Ratings and reviews are merely personal, and therefore, subjective opinions. One reader's "Best book ever!" may very well be another reader's "Worst book ever!".

Authors would be much better served by striving to continuously improve upon basic writing skills (spelling, grammar, punctuation, syntax, and narration), as well as promotional and marketing expertise rather than obsessing over reviews.


Susanna - Censored by GoodReads (susannag) | 137 comments Oh, I've been convinced to read books by "bad" reviews. Those of the "It had X and I hate X variety!" Maybe I like X.


message 39: by Alexandra (new)

Alexandra | 374 comments Susanna - Censored by GoodReads wrote: "Oh, I've been convinced to read books by "bad" reviews. Those of the "It had X and I hate X variety!" Maybe I like X."

Yup. And dissuaded from lots of glowy reviews telling me those books have things I do NOT like.


message 40: by Marie (last edited Mar 17, 2020 10:19PM) (new)

Marie | 30 comments The one problem not mentioned is promoters agree to promote a book on the amount of reviews and their ranking. I find the pages read on Amazon where I make most of my sales hardly ever draws a review. The number of reviews received has really gone down the last couple of years. I have five books out and another soon will be. the first two have over 1500 reviews between them. On the others, reviews are hard to get, so yes the reviews are for readers, but their numbers affect sales for the authors. Catch twenty-two.


message 41: by Faith (last edited Mar 18, 2020 04:02AM) (new)

Faith Jones (havingfaith) | 61 comments Marie wrote: "I find the pages read on Amazon where I make most of my sales hardly ever draws a revi..."

Do you want to know the reason for this? Amazon launched a service called Vine to monetize reviewing, where the author pays Amazon to assign their own product reviewer, who can be anyone (not necessarily someone who likes books or specialises in reading your genre). Authors weren't paying Amazon for Vine reviews, which are expensive, so Amazon decided to get rid of the competition - independent reviewers who post reviews on the Amazon system for free.

The first thing I knew about this policy was when Amazon deleted 53 of my book reviews without warning. I put in a complaint asking why they did this, as I had bought 50% of the books on Amazon, I don't know the authors and they were not paid-for reviews, with a range of star ratings averaging 3 point something. Amazon thought about my complaint for a few days and then deleted the rest of my reviews (216 total) for an unspecified reason (again). In response, I closed my Amazon account and then they retalitated by deleting my ebook/Kindle content - which I had paid for.

Amazon don't want independent reviewers, so that's the reason you won't get many reviews. If you pay Amazon for some, the opinions you receive will be low quality, i.e. "I thought it was ok", with no in-depth analysis.


message 42: by Roxanne (new)

Roxanne Bland (roxanne2) | 18 comments A.W. wrote: "Roxanne wrote: "Yet reader reviews are still important. It's feedback for the author."

Reviews are not author feedback - they are customer opinions.

Personally I don't read reviews on my books. I..."


Precisely, A.W. It is the reader's opinion. And it is that opinion which helps me to write better books. I don't need to look for misspellings, grammatical mistakes, etc., because I hire editors. I hire people to professionally format my books. I want to hear from readers. I WANT their opinions. What's good, what's bad about my work, so I know where I need to improve. My first book wasn't received well. Many found it confusing. I had the book re-edited and wrote new scenes. The story is the same, and this time the reviews I've received for the revised book are much, much better. For me, reader opinions are important because as an author, my primary goal is to entertain. If readers enjoy my book, if it gives them a few hours of escape from the drudgery, then I have succeeded in doing what I set out to do.


message 43: by Mellie (new)

Mellie (mellie42) | 618 comments Marie wrote: "The one problem not mentioned is promoters agree to promote a book on the amount of reviews..."

The good ones don't. For example BookBub has NO review criteria as they individually curate the titles they feature. I've had featured deals on titles with no reviews.


message 44: by Miss M (new)

Miss M | 84 comments Faith wrote: "Marie wrote: "I find the pages read on Amazon where I make most of my sales hardly ever draws a revi..."

Do you want to know the reason for this? Amazon launched a service called Vine to monetize ..."


Eh, no. Amazon Vine has been around forever...since 2007, actually.


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