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Writer's Circle > Call back to tradition???

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message 1: by T. (new)

T. Renee | 18 comments I recently just ran my first Amazon giveaway, my novel is in paperback as well as e-book form. I noticed I got five times the entrants for the paperback giveaway than I did the ebook which surprised the heck out of me because all the feedback I initially got was EBOOK EBOOK EBOOK you neeeeed to do an EBOOK no one buys books anymore. Now, as I've just released my first poetry collection, this I've done in paperback only, but my publisher has asked if I would like to do conversion, I'm wondering is it worth it. Is anyone else seeing a trend in people wanting physical copies over digital, or am I misunderstanding the results, or reading too much into the results of the giveaway?


message 2: by Bo (new)

Bo | 1 comments Book sales are increasing, as are abook sales. But I think the hype for ebooks has died down so now people are once again just buying whatever they feel the most comfortable reading. I read both myself but know people that only read one or the other.


message 3: by Gina (new)

Gina Briganti | 35 comments T. wrote: "I recently just ran my first Amazon giveaway, my novel is in paperback as well as e-book form. I noticed I got five times the entrants for the paperback giveaway than I did the ebook which surprise..."

Ebook prices are up again, which may account for paperback sales rising.

I have sold a few more paperbacks recently, and I have purchased a few more personally. I think price may have an impact on which one is more popular. Ebook sales are still higher than paperback for me at the moment.


message 4: by Jim (new)

Jim Vuksic T. wrote: "I recently just ran my first Amazon giveaway, my novel is in paperback as well as e-book form. I noticed I got five times the entrants for the paperback giveaway than I did the ebook which surprise..."

T.,

The following data from the sales reports issued by the publisher of my one and only novel may not reflect the industry norm; however, it may prove interesting.

Total Units Sold (Aug. 9, 2011 through Dec. 31, 2016) = 1,029. Total Royalties = $2,358.34.
Paperback - 485 units (47.1%). Royalties Paid - $1,547.34
E-Book - 480 units (46.7%). Royalties Paid - $584.43
Audio on CD - 36 units (3.5%). Royalties Paid - $134.17
Audio Download - 28 (2.7%). Royalties Paid - $92.40

I wish you success in you writing career. Few succeed in this extremely competitive field; however, some do. There is no reason you could not be one of them someday.


message 5: by Will (new)

Will Once (willonce) | 210 comments If someone offers to give you a book for free, what do you think looks like the best value ...

... a free ebook?

... a free paperback?

My guess is that most people would say that a free paperback has more value as a giveaway. It has a physical presence and costs the author real money to send it to me.

If instead you go out and spend your own money on a book, what is more appealing ...

... a full price paperback?

... a slightly cheaper ebook?

And here I'm guessing that people will choose whatever they prefer to read. Or go for the cheapest option.

What people choose as a giveaway is not necessarily indicative of what they would choose if they had to pay for it.


message 6: by T. (new)

T. Renee | 18 comments Gina - Thanks For the info, since your e-book sales are only slightly higher do you think it would be worth the investment to pay for a conversion for my poetry collection? Or would the sales I made from any e-book purchases likely be washed out by the cost of the conversion. Based on Jims numbers it appears hes doing wonderful with paperback on it's own and based on what Will said, preference when it comes to the true book enthusiast is in fact paperback, people want something physical because it's more appealing. Now, I personally don't own any kind of device to read an e-book on, not if you exclude my laptop, but that's just me, I love the feel of a book in my hand. How much would you say preference outweighs cost (that questions open to all, not just Gina, thanks in advance)?


message 7: by Jim (new)

Jim Vuksic T. wrote: "Gina - Thanks For the info, since your e-book sales are only slightly higher do you think it would be worth the investment to pay for a conversion for my poetry collection? Or would the sales I mad..."

T.,
Another way of looking at the paperback vs. e-book comparison is from a purely financial viewpoint.
Referencing the example in message 4:
Although the sales of paperback books (485 units or 47.1%) versus e-book sales (480 units or 46.7%) are nearly identical, the difference in the financial return (royalties) was significant: $1,547.34 (65.6%) from paperback sales compared to $584.43 (24.8%) from e-book sales.


message 8: by Ken (new)

Ken (kendoyle) | 347 comments T. wrote: " Is anyone else seeing a trend in people wanting physical copies over digital, or am I misunderstanding the results, or reading too much into the results of the giveaway?..."

I suggest not basing any decisions on the results of a giveaway. In addition to what Will said, the audience for a freebie is very different from those who purchase books (whether e-books or paperbacks).


message 9: by Miss M (last edited Mar 21, 2018 03:58PM) (new)

Miss M | 84 comments I agree with Will and Ken - there are all sorts of prosaic reasons why people might prefer free paper books over ebooks in the context of a giveaway, but those don't necessarily reflect paying customers' habits. There have been a lot of threads here over time, with authors documenting that their giveaway books quickly show up for resale in the Amazon Marketplace, so that may be one motive. Also, for the new ebook giveaway system entrants have to join their Amazon and Goodreads accounts which is something a lot of users (including me) won't do. So for the few giveaways I do participate in, they're paper-only even though 90% of my reading/buying is ebooks. I just wouldn't assume that giveaway behavior equals customer behavior.


message 10: by T. (new)

T. Renee | 18 comments Thank you both for the info. I wasn't aware of the whole requirement to join amazon accounts, which does change my initial conclusion a bit. If I felt forced to do something that wasn't my own idea, I wouldn't do it either. I think I'll give it a run for a few months and see how things go and decide on the conversion later. I'm learning quickly that as an indie author, patience is paramount.

Thanks Guys!


message 11: by Marie Silk (new)

Marie Silk | 223 comments Ebooks are much easier to market than paperbacks, in my experience. About 90% of my sales are ebooks. Paperback and audio sales make up the rest.

My questions are, do you have control over the price/promotion of your book, or does your publisher? Why wouldn't the publisher do an ebook conversion automatically? Do you have to pay for it? Beware of vanity presses who overcharge authors for these kinds of services and hold all the control over pricing.

When I first published, I didn't think I would sell very many ebooks because I didn't read ebooks myself. I have since discovered how popular they are in every age group, especially with travelers. They are able to take hundreds of digital books with them on their trips without increasing luggage weight. If you don't publish in digital, you potentially reduce the audience who might otherwise buy from you. But if you are being charged too much to convert the book and don't have control over pricing and promotion, it may be difficult to recoup your expenses.


message 12: by Gina (new)

Gina Briganti | 35 comments T. wrote: "Gina - Thanks For the info, since your e-book sales are only slightly higher do you think it would be worth the investment to pay for a conversion for my poetry collection? Or would the sales I mad..."

What's ironic is that I went through this Q&A with myself about doing a paperback version of my latest fiction release! Which I did do. Ebooks are selling better.

I think ebooks are an important option to offer. Added to that, I attended Coastal Magic Convention last month, and authors were discussing the ebook v. paperback question during an unrelated panel; the consensus for them was that their contracts yield higher royalties on ebook sales.

In the end, you have to make your decisions based on what matters most to you.

Ebooks were not on my radar as a reader until one of my favorite authors released a title as ebook only. I had to read it, and so I downloaded the Kindle for PC app to my laptop. Now I prefer ebooks unless they are priced the same as a paperback. If I can purchase a paperback for the same amount, and can share or donate the paperback later on, then I consider that a better option.

How much are you being asked to pay for the conversion, if you don't mind sharing? My guess is it shouldn't be more than $45 or so based on offers I've seen in FB groups. It's just a couple of button pushes, after all.


message 13: by T. (new)

T. Renee | 18 comments Hey Gina,

They haven't exactly quoted me a price yet, they just asked if I was interested in conversion. But knowing that its not all that costly does weigh down my pro list for it a little bit more. I think I'm having a tough time with it because of my personal feelings about poetry and paperback. I don't know poetry for me is something you hold in your hands, and as poetry is not tremendously popular or read by as many people as like fantasy, dystopian, etc. I guess I just kindda felt like anyone seeking out a poetry book would be seeking a physical copy. For me it's like green ketchup... you know its ketchup and it taste the same but you feel it should be red not green. I dunno, maybe there is someone(s) out there who like green ketchup, maybe its just me.


message 14: by Gina (new)

Gina Briganti | 35 comments T. wrote: "Hey Gina,

They haven't exactly quoted me a price yet, they just asked if I was interested in conversion. But knowing that its not all that costly does weigh down my pro list for it a little bit m..."


T.,

You are doing the research and so you will come up with the answer that fits your career best.

Fwiw, I buy poetry ebooks because a lot of my friends are publishing that way and the ebook price and formats do not take away from the experience, for me.


message 15: by Van (new)

Van Fleisher (van_fleisher) | 17 comments T. wrote: "I recently just ran my first Amazon giveaway, my novel is in paperback as well as e-book form. I noticed I got five times the entrants for the paperback giveaway than I did the ebook which surprise..."

It may also be so they can sell it later on Amazon! A friend of mine bought a paperback of mine via Amazon and told me it was inscribed by me through a Goodreads Giveaway. I looked at other used offers and some actually say they are inscribed by the author.

Used - Very Good
Inscribed by author, authentication provided. Inscription reads, "SHARON - THIS IS *YOUR* FINAL NOTICE! HOPE YOU ENJOY IT." First Edition. Minor dinging on the cover plus neglible dinging on front two corners. Includes CD with "Trudi's Song" and bookmark


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