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Group Read - Sunburn > Group Read - Sunburn Part 2 Ch 22-33 Spoilers Welcome

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message 1: by Ann (new) - rated it 5 stars

Ann (annrumsey) | 14297 comments Part two is twenty-four chapters - let's break the comments on this topic to chapters 22-33 starting part two
If the first to post, please briefly summarize this segment to guide the discussion. Spoilers Welcome.


message 2: by Geri (last edited Mar 28, 2018 09:49PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Geri Sunburn

22 - Polly told police Kath likely visited her. Faulty stove caused explosion and fire. Polly wants to buy a house in Bellevue. She has a feeling she will come into some money.

23 - Polly looks through weekly paper for homes to buy. She will be divorcing Greg. Kath’s family complaining about the investigation and myriad of mistakes. Brother in law threatens to sue Polly.

24 - Background on Irving and his business. And how Irving met Ditmars. And the beginning of the insurance scam.

25 - Adam argues with himself about what he wants to do and if Polly killed Kath.

26 - Polly goes to see Greg and Janny. Then sees her other daughter, Joy. She sees a lawyer about speeding up the divorce. She does not want Greg to know about her money.

27 - Savannah, Greg’s Mother, tells Greg she saw Polly across the street.

28 - Adam becomes more suspicious of Polly, her behavior has changed.

29 - Adam and Polly are living together. Kath’s brother in law confronts Polly again. Polly tells him about Ditmars and fires he set. And how Irving may have been after her and killed Kath by mistake.

30 - June, Kath’s Sister, contemplates Kath’s life as she encourages parents to eat.

31 - Adam continues to not trust Polly. He is becoming restless and not happy in a small town like Bellevue. Adam searches Polly’s purse and finds a notebook with dates that correspond with the final months of Polly’s marriage.

32 - Polly visits Irving. She says she wants to make amends.

33 - It’s Halloween. Polly reminisces about her childhood. And tells Adam in detail how she killed her husband. After asking Adam if he thinks she killed Kath, Adam replies he doesn’t know.


message 3: by Ann (new) - rated it 5 stars

Ann (annrumsey) | 14297 comments Geri: I liked this segment! Now that we are in part two, we have started learning the revelations of much more of Polly’s background. Her abusive first marriage was horrific, Irving isn’t coming off as a saint, and the growing distrust between Adam and Polly makes me nervous over what she will do.
Now that we know about both daughters I am torn further about how I feel that Polly abandoned her daughters.
I am deeply suspicious of Kath’s death and don’t for a minute believe Irving sent a hit man. (But what a story) Once again I doubt Adam’s objectivity.
I like how it is starting to become clearer “when” this time at the diner in Bellevue took place. Part one seemed more like a bubble out of time. Part two is revealing and becoming illuminating. Good summaries! Thanks!


Geri After reading my summaries, I realize how many POVs Lippmann has in this book. Not sure we needed June or Savannah’s. But I love the chapters with Polly. Her thoughts during her abusive marriage and after are revealing on how she became the person she is.

Knowing Polly as I do to this point, I was very suspicious of her regarding Kath’s convenient death. And, yes, Adam is definitely NOT objective!


message 5: by Ann (new) - rated it 5 stars

Ann (annrumsey) | 14297 comments Geri: I hadn't thought about the other POV's fleshed out in this part two; June (Kath's sister) and Savannah (Greg's mother) appear mainly as vehicles to move parts of the story along but aren't much more than relationship connections. Polly and Adam are such well defined characters while still being works in progress - making the others pale in comparison, even Kath and Irving.

Geri wrote: "After reading my summaries, I realize how many POVs Lippmann has in this book. Not sure we needed June or Savannah’s. But I love the chapters with Polly. Her thoughts during her abusive marriage an..."


James Emery | 14 comments Again, late to the read but wanted to add my thoughts.

So now, we're in the 3/4th section. I feel that Lippman has used this section as the point to adjust the main characters' goals. Classically (at least how I see things) a midpoint plot development will cause the characters to adjust or change the goal. Before, Polly was running away from a husband and towards her payday. Now, after the death of Kath, she's become more active. She spies on her kids and confronts Irving. She's taken a much more active role in her plot development instead of reactive to the inciting incident. Adam, too, has shifted. No longer about the job, and now potentially now longer about his love for Polly, he seems to be reconsidering everything. Her, his future with her, or without her. Who is she really? What does he want, and more importantly what does she want?

A subtext that is driving this to me is the idea of facades. Who is Polly? Is she who she presents to her husbands? To Adam? To the reader? To Irving? We're given glimpses into her psyche and I still don't know the answer. And for Adam, is he truly in love with Polly? Was this a reverse Stockholm kind of thing? His façade is going to crack soon when Polly discovers who he really is.

The POVs bother me, too. Lippman is more accomplished than I will ever be, but the use of them in this novel is lazy. The majority of minor POVs are there just to move the plot or add depth. Not a fan.

And I still not sure how I feel about the novel on the whole. I'm enjoying it, but I could also stop reading it at anytime and not feel like I'm missing out. It's almost as if it's stuck in one gear. The death of Kath, I thought, would push it further, but instead we get a lot of backstory fill in and attempts to capture internal moods and not more driving action save the trip to Irving.


message 7: by Ann (new) - rated it 5 stars

Ann (annrumsey) | 14297 comments James, it's good to hear your thoughts on this section. Polly does seem to wake up and stop drifting (poor Kath) and I wonder what she knows or suspects about Adam' motivations, especially as he cools towards her.


Ceelee | 204 comments Well, I am a little late back here myself. . Didn't do much reading at all last week as I am working on two projects. Hopefully, I will have more time this weekend! This section was pretty good because it gave us some answers like what happened to Polly's daughters and what role Irving really plays in this story. Adam seems to be shifting in his love of Polly so that is good but he better watch his back! If her story on how she killed her husband didn't sober him up, nothing will. I don't really mind the multiple POV unless the characters don't really contribute much to the story. Sometimes they are used as a distraction from the plot so it will confuse the reader as to outcome of the story. It is sometimes hard to tell until the end how important some characters' narrative will be an essential plot device.
Polly is a great evil, desperate character but I sure wouldn't want to live next door to her!
On to the final section then I can start Crimson Lake!


message 9: by Ann (new) - rated it 5 stars

Ann (annrumsey) | 14297 comments Ceelee: I am also usually willing to give an author leeway on developing (or not!) the peripheral characters. It often is fun to speculate how they will fit in later. Occasionally when a book seems to drag I might wish for a more directed approach if there is a lot of character chatter.
I would also not want to live next door or near Polly and definitely not be in her way towards a love interest!
And Crimson Lake is very good!!

Ceelee wrote: "Well, I am a little late back here myself. . Didn't do much reading at all last week as I am working on two projects. Hopefully, I will have more time this weekend!
I don't really mind the multiple POV unless the characters don't really contribute much to the story. Sometimes they are used as a distraction from the plot so it will confuse the reader as to outcome of the story. It is sometimes hard to tell until the end how important some characters' narrative will be an essential plot device.
Polly is a great evil, desperate character but I sure wouldn't want to live next door to her!
..."



message 10: by Ann (new) - rated it 5 stars

Ann (annrumsey) | 14297 comments Ofra: The abbreviation POV stands for "point of view" which in this case describes multiple characters representing different sides or perspectives of the story.
Ofra wrote: "What do you mean by POV?"


message 11: by Ann (new) - rated it 5 stars

Ann (annrumsey) | 14297 comments Ofra: The abbreviation POV stands for "point of view" which in this case describes multiple characters representing different sides or perspectives of the story.
Ofra wrote: "What do you mean by POV?"


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