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The Sympathizer
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Book Discussions > March Fiction Only Book Club: The Sympathizer

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Flint Public | 40 comments Mod
Join us this Wednesday, March 21st, for the Fiction Only Book Club's discussion of The Sympathizer. If you can't make the meeting, please leave your comments here. This is a great way to participate if you can't make a meeting!


Flint Public | 40 comments Mod
Fiction Only Book Club members' opinions about The Sympathizer were a mixed bag indeed. Some members liked the book, some thought it was an important book, others appreciated the book, yet some chose not to read it for different reasons, including the subject of the Vietnam War brought back too many painful memories. And many members just did not like it. One thing that most members could agree on was the book's length: most thought The Sympathizer was way too wordy!

I will say that this was probably one of the more interesting book discussions we've had, which proves the point that you do not have to like a book to have a meaningful discussion about it!

If you've read The Sympathizer, please let us know your thoughts. If you attended the meeting and have something to add, please do. Let's keep the discussion going!


Flint Public | 40 comments Mod
Readers, let's jump ahead to the book's ending: What are your thoughts on the confinement and confession of The Narrator? Were you surprised that he was kept in isolation while he wrote his confession? Were you surprised/puzzled that he was required to write a confession at all?


message 4: by Ann (new) - added it

Ann | 12 comments Flint wrote: "Readers, let's jump ahead to the book's ending: What are your thoughts on the confinement and confession of The Narrator? Were you surprised that he was kept in isolation while he wrote his confess..."

Yes, I was puzzled as to why The Narrator had to write a confession. He was reporting back to Man on what appeared to be a regular basis. He told Man the General's plans. I thought he had shown his loyalty to the cause. The only thing he did, in my eyes, was disobey Man's order to stay in the US. After reading more of the book, it seems the he was seen as too American, too sympathetic to the other side, and not doing anything to help a fellow agent. And that appears the reason for the required confession.
I'd love hear other's opinions and take on this!


message 5: by Diane (new)

Diane M. | 14 comments I enjoyed the book even though it was long and wordy. It gave me insight into what actually happened in Vietnam and also into how American is seen by those from outside who come here. It was disturbing at parts but I thought it was important to see how revolutions usually turn back onto the people who supported them. The scramble for power in the vacuum that is created by the destruction of the old power structure doesn't spare those who brought it about.


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