Golden Age of Hollywood Book Club discussion

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message 1: by Feliks, Co-Moderator (new)

Feliks (dzerzhinsky) | 2483 comments Mod
A list of some the most famous studio writers.

Sidney Buchman:

(wrote for Capra)

Theodora Goes Wild (1936)

The Awful Truth (1937)

Holiday (1938)

Lost Horizon (1937)

Mr. Smith Goes To Washington (1939)

Here Comes Mr. Jordan (1941)

The Talk of the Town (1942)



Robert Riskin:

(wrote for Capra)

American Madness (1932)

It Happened One Night (1934)

Mr. Deeds Goes To Town (1936)

You Cant Take It With You (1938)

Meet John Doe (1941)



William Faulkner:

(associated with Hawks)

The Road to Glory (1936)

To Have and Have Not (1944)

The Big Sleep (1946)



Clifford Odetts:

The General Died at Dawn (1936)

Humoresque (1946)

None But the Lonely Heart (1944)

Clash by Night (1952)

The Country Girl (1954)

The Big Knife (1955)

Bigger Than Life (1956)

Sweet Smell of Success (1957)



John Balderstone:

(associated with horror, fantasy)

Dracula (1931)

Frankenstein (1931)

The Mummy (1932)

The Bride of Frankenstein (1935)

The Prisoner of Zenda (1937)

Gas Light (1944)



Edwin Justus Mayer:

(associated with Ernst Lubitsch)

Desire (1936)

A Royal Scandal (1945)

To Be Or Not To Be (1942)



Samuel Hoffenstein:

Dr. Jekyll and Mister Hyde (1932)

Tales of Manhattan (1942)

Laura (1944)

Phantom of the Opera (1943)

The Wizard of Oz (1939, part of team)



Daniel Fuchs:

The Hard Way (1942)

Criss-Cross (1949)

Panic in the Streets (1950)

Love Me or Leave Me (1955)



John Lee Mahin:

(wrote for Jean Harlow & Clark Gable)

Riffraff (1936)

China Seas (1935)

Bombshell (1933)

Red Dust (1932)

Too Hot To Handle (1930)

Test Pilot (1938)

Gone with the Wind (1939, part of team)

Boom Town (1940)



Frances Marion:

(wrote for Pickford, Jean Harlow, Marie Dressler)

Dinner at Eight (1933)

The Big House (1930)

Min and Bill (1930)

The Champ (1931)

Camille (1937)



Anita Loos:

San Francisco (1936)

Saratoga (1937)

The Women (1939)



June Mathis:

(wrote for deMille, Von Stroheim)

The Four Horseman of the Apocalypse (1921)

Ben-Hur (1925)

Greed (1924)



C. Gardner Sullivan:

(associated with deMille)

The Buccaneer (1938)

Union Pacific (1939)

Northwest Mounted Police (1940)



Lamarr Trotti:

(associated with John Ford)

Judge Priest (1934)

Steamboat Round the Bend (1935)

Drums Along the Mohawk (1939)

Young Mr. Lincoln (1939)



Ben Hecht:

(wrote for Howard Hawks, Hitchcock)

Underworld (1927)

The Front Page (1931)

His Girl Friday (1940)

Barbary Coast (1935)

Foreign Correspondent (1940)

Spellbound (1945)

Notorious (1946)



Casey Robinson:

(wrote for Bette Davis, Errol Flynn)

Its Love I'm After (1937)

Dark Victory (1939)

Now, Voyager (1942)

The Corn is Green (1945)

All This And Heaven Too (1940)

The Old Maid (1939)



Herman J. Mankiewicz:

(associated with Marx Bros)

The Cocoanuts (1929)

Animal Crackers (1930)



Jeannie MacPherson:

(associated with Cecil B. deMille)

Manslaughter (1922)

The Ten Commandments (1923)



William LeBaron:

(associated with W.C. Fields, Mae West)

The Beautiful Rebel (1924)

The Old-Fashioned Way (1934)

Its a Gift (1934)

She Done Him Wrong (1933)

I'm No Angel (1933)

Cimarron (1931)



John Paxton:

(associated with noir)

Cornered (1945)

Murder, My Sweet (1944)

Crossfire (1947)

Crack-up (1946)



Charles Schnee:

(associated with noir)

They Live By Night (1949)

I Walk Alone (1947)

Scene of the Crime (1949)



Daniel Mainwaring:

(associated with noir)

From Out of the Past (1947)

The Big Steal (1949)

The Phenix City Story (1955)

Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956)



Jules Furthman:

(associated with Hawks, westerns, gangster, Von Sternberg, Marlene Dietrich)

The Texan (1920)

The Iron Rider (1920)

The Big Punch (1921)

The Dragnet (1928)

Thunderbolt (1929)

The Docks of New York (1928)

Morocco (1930)

Mutiny on the Bounty (1935)

Body and Soul (1931)

The Blue Angel (1930, part of team)

The Way of All Flesh (1940)

Only Angels Have Wings (1940)

The Shanghai Gesture (1941)

The Shanghai Express (1932)

The Peking Express (1951)

The Outlaw (1943)

Blonde Venus (1932)

Nightmare Alley (1947)

Rio Bravo (1959)


message 2: by Feliks, Co-Moderator (new)

Feliks (dzerzhinsky) | 2483 comments Mod
my own faves:

Robert Towne (Chinatown, many others
William Goldman (Harper, Butch Cassidy, All the President's Men)
Frank Pearson (Dog Day Afternoon, many others)
Wendell Mayes (Advise and Consent, the Poseidon Adventure)
Francis Ford Coppola (The Great Gatsby, the Conversation)


message 3: by Jamie (new)

Jamie  (jaymers8413) | 88 comments Mod
So many great movies and writers! It is interesting to see them categorized by screenwriters. I love His Girl Friday and didn't realize the screenwriter, Hecht, also wrote Spellbound and Notorious. Thanks for sharing!


message 4: by Spencer (new)

Spencer Rich | 894 comments Let's not forget Charles Bracket and I.A.L. Diamond who were associated with Wilder at different times. Also, Raymond Chandler took a few swipes at screenwriting.


message 5: by Spencer (new)

Spencer Rich | 894 comments Ernest Lehman
Buck Henry
Trumbo


message 6: by Feliks, Co-Moderator (new)

Feliks (dzerzhinsky) | 2483 comments Mod
Certainly; Brackett was Wilder's partner for quite some time.

What's interesting is the way studios deployed and arranged their 'stable' of writers and --something which would be unheard of today --allowed some writers to work repeatedly for any 'winning combination of director and actor.

One thing which is the same (betwixt the studio era and today) is the way that a big star can retain a persistent personal entourage which can take priority even over the hair/makeup/wardrobe people in the official crew for any picture. Marilyn Monroe had an advisor accompany her on her projects who could even override the director on which angle to shoot her face from.


message 7: by Spencer (new)

Spencer Rich | 894 comments Yeah. Some stars became associated with famous designers. Other stars just wanted Edith Head every picture. Which probably got thorny when they changed studios. Even on one of those one-off trades.


message 8: by Patrick (new)

Patrick Charsky | 3 comments Jules Furthman. I didn't know that one. Shanghai Express is one of my favorite Von Sternberg/Dietrich collaborations.


message 9: by Betsy (new)

Betsy | 2410 comments Spencer wrote: "Yeah. Some stars became associated with famous designers. Other stars just wanted Edith Head every picture. Which probably got thorny when they changed studios. Even on one of those one-off trades."

Speaking of designers, Audrey Hepburn was famous for her connection with Givenchy. In fact in, 'How to Steal a Million' when she's wearing some rather plain working-day clothes, Peter O'Toole comments that, 'she's giving Givenchy the day off.'


message 10: by Feliks, Co-Moderator (last edited Dec 31, 2019 09:00AM) (new)

Feliks (dzerzhinsky) | 2483 comments Mod
a camrade of mine is gaga for French screenwriter Jacques Prevert

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacques...


message 11: by Feliks, Co-Moderator (new)

Feliks (dzerzhinsky) | 2483 comments Mod
As the article notes, 'Children of Paradise' is a stellar flick of World Cinema (that's world cinema with a capital 'W' and capital 'C')

But I myself have yet to experience it. We don't speak much about French cinema in this group (at least not yet) and its probably for reasons exactly like this. I've seen a fair amount and I have my favorites, but still am missing some major titles.

By the way? Has anyone here viewed 'Les Vampyrs'? It's available on Youtube; but it's an incredible nine hours long!


message 12: by Jill (last edited Dec 31, 2019 09:12AM) (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) | 2687 comments He certainly wrote or contributed to some of France's great film classics. I have seen L'Atalante and Les Enfants du Paradis but there are so many more that are worth looking for. Call me dumb but I did not know he was also a famous poet!


message 13: by Feliks, Co-Moderator (new)

Feliks (dzerzhinsky) | 2483 comments Mod
maybe we need a top ten french film list to see what each of us might be missing


message 14: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) | 2687 comments It would be good if you could work it into an existing topic. There are some classic French films that need to be seen.


message 15: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) | 2687 comments Feliks wrote: "As the article notes, 'Children of Paradise' is a stellar flick of World Cinema (that's world cinema with a capital 'W' and capital 'C')

But I myself have yet to experience it. We don't speak much..."


I have seen the 1915 silent serial Les Vampires (not every episode) which is on Youtube. Is that the one you mean?


message 16: by Feliks, Co-Moderator (new)

Feliks (dzerzhinsky) | 2483 comments Mod
That's the one. It's another flick made while the Germans were in charge of the city.


message 17: by Feliks, Co-Moderator (new)

Feliks (dzerzhinsky) | 2483 comments Mod
Just saw a mighty gloomy statistic.

At the top of this thread, notice how each screenwriter has 3, 4, or even 10 screenplay credits. That was how the big studios rewarded and groomed their stable of top talent.

In the post-studio era, the percentage of screenwriters who write a second screenplay ...which is turned into a second credit ...on their resume? Screamingly low.

It's astounding to me when some people insist we're better off.


message 18: by Doubledf99.99 (new)

Doubledf99.99 | 257 comments Feliks wrote: "maybe we need a top ten french film list to see what each of us might be missing"

about the only French film that come immediately to my mind that I've see a few times is, Alphaville.


message 19: by Feliks, Co-Moderator (new)

Feliks (dzerzhinsky) | 2483 comments Mod
This great article from legendary screenwriter Robert Towne, might easily go under our, 'current industry woes' section.

He talks about how today's 'cult of individualism' and 'fragmented society' is becoming too atomistic/granular for cinema to be effective any more.

https://tinyurl.com/rhuzsnf


message 20: by Doubledf99.99 (new)

Doubledf99.99 | 257 comments Interesting read. thank for the link.

this may be off topic, my brother went to Montgomery Ala. over the weekend to the ASF to see Alabama Story, he had breakfast with playwright Kennth Jones, my brother is going to put on the play in May at the Lincoln Museum in Springfield Il and he's all excited about it.


message 21: by Feliks, Co-Moderator (new)

Feliks (dzerzhinsky) | 2483 comments Mod
Wow. That's a bit o' Ore-Ida


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