Goodreads Ireland discussion

126 views
☘ Just one book... for Ireland ☘

Comments Showing 1-15 of 15 (15 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Andy (new)

Andy (_btp) | 311 comments My geographical challenge currently has me reading books from west African countries. In some cases have gotten recommendations on books that I feel gave me a really good feel for the country and people.

In the spirit of the group and the weekend that is in it
if you were asked to recommend just one book (fiction or non-fiction) that epitomises Ireland or the Irish to someone who knew little or nothing about either
what would that book be?

similarly, if you are living elsewhere, what one book would you recommend for your country or state?


Peter (on hiatus) (peterdonnelly) | 35 comments What a great idea for this weekend.

There are so many great reads and authors, it is a very difficult choice. I would suggest "The Commitments" by Roddy Doyle for the humour, talent and tough environment on display.

If we could go with Ireland and the United States I'd say "Angela's Ashes" by Frank McCourt.


message 3: by Andy (new)

Andy (_btp) | 311 comments Peter wrote: "What a great idea for this weekend.

There are so many great reads and authors, it is a very difficult choice. I would suggest "The Commitments" by Roddy Doyle for the humour, talent and tough envi..."


Haven't read either author Peter
must rectify for Roddy Doyle
I have some preconceptions about Angela's Ashes, not sure I will ever venture down that alley


message 4: by Clare (last edited Mar 17, 2018 04:37AM) (new)

Clare O'Beara | 151 comments Angela - rains a lot.
Roddy - swears a lot.
Something lighter please? Something not mired in poverty?

Now I've got to suggest one....
The state of Grace
The state of Grace by Catherine Donnelly
For adults.
For younger readers:
Chesca and the Spirit of Grace
Chesca and the Spirit of Grace by Lara O'Brien .
For historical fans (since I'm on the Grace O'Malley theme)
Grania: She-King of the Irish Seas
Grania She-King of the Irish Seas by Morgan Llywelyn


message 6: by Ali (last edited Mar 18, 2018 05:40AM) (new)

Ali (ali909) | 88 comments I'd second Roddy Doyle! For me personally, he has always been the ultimate illustration of "Irishness" in books :))
Yes, he swears a lot, yes, a bit of tough times, but the spirit, the humour, the attitudes, the aspirations and relationships set in Irish context are portrayed very well.


message 7: by Hans (new)

Hans Roddy Doyle is ok! But I suggest the complete Barrytown Trilogy. For me it sums up the Irish like I know them being a frequent tourist :).


message 8: by Andy (last edited Mar 20, 2018 02:08AM) (new)

Andy (_btp) | 311 comments will definitely look to pick up some Roddy Doyle

Like to recommend some Flann O'Brien, but not sure if it is representing Ireland in particular

btw, saw this on the bestsellers list in Ireland last weekend
The Cow Book The story of life on an Irish family farm by John Connell


message 9: by Susie (new)

Susie Murphy (susiemurphywrites) | 3 comments Donal Ryan's The Spinning Heart is an interesting reflection on Ireland in recent years. It's sometimes a bit on the bleak side though...!


message 10: by Michael (new)

Michael (micky74007) 1916: A Novel of the Irish Rebellion.

This is the first in a five book series. This will give you a very good history of the Irish century in a most enjoyable series of novels. Best read in sequence.


message 11: by Jazzy (last edited Mar 17, 2019 01:12PM) (new)

Jazzy Lemon (jazzylemon) I'll second A Treasury of Irish Fairy and Folk Tales! I just bought that this month.

I have read Dubliners by James Joyce
earlier in the month. His Ulysses is great too.


message 12: by Míceál (new)

Míceál  Ó Gealbháin (miceal) | 11 comments I'm with Michael on this. Morgan Llywelyn's five book series is very good. (read in order).


message 13: by J.S. (new)

J.S. Dunn (httpwwwjsdunnbookscom) | 335 comments Hmmm. Joyce's Ulysses .

Nonfiction: How the Irish Saved Civilization: The Untold Story of Ireland's Heroic Role from the Fall of Rome to the Rise of Medieval Europe . Cahill gets it: the Land of Saints and Scholars ...Too bad it has succumbed to 21st century popular culture and permits the dumbing down of Ireland's students in comparison with learning Latin in a hedge school........

Given the very recent findings in archaeogenetics of ancient invaders displacing the native haplotype (males) at around 2200 BCE, I hereby nominate my own fiction, Bending the Boyne: A Novel of Ancient Ireland
Ten years of reading, travel, and research on ancient Eriu, first published 2011, and still bang-on for genetics, archaeology, sea trade of the Isles, and ancient astronomy at Bru na Boinn in that era. The tale also foreshadows Irish history; there is a cathartic Rising at the conclusion. You won't see any leprechauns (and none were harmed in writing this novel.)


message 14: by SherryRose (new)

SherryRose | 0 comments Clare wrote: "Angela - rains a lot.
Roddy - swears a lot.
Something lighter please? Something not mired in poverty?

Now I've got to suggest one....
The state of Grace
[bookcover:The state of Gr..."


I know you posted this a long time ago but I agree!! I don’t live in Ireland but I have to assume most people are not so depressed and dreary! Some parts of your history are very rough but the Irish people in this group are friendly and cheerful. In fact Irish people are quite bright with a wonder sense of humor. I hope to God people don’t see Ireland through the eyes of Frank McCourt!


message 15: by Colleen Chi-Girl (new)

Colleen Chi-Girl (colleenchi-girlakacolleensnapped) | 29 comments Hello from un-sunny California :) which is just as I like it. I thought I'd add some contemporary Irish authors that I've been enjoying...

Tana French's crime novels - beautiful writing - any of them

Jess Kid - Himself (on audio in my waitlist)


Colleen


back to top