LATI Spring 2018 discussion

27 views
What book must everyone read?

Comments Showing 1-15 of 15 (15 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Meg (new)

Meg (navbrat) | 13 comments Mod
Which book is your go-to recommendation? Do you have men and women categories? Does your fave cross gender lines?


message 2: by Lynn (last edited Mar 19, 2018 06:24PM) (new)

Lynn I'm completely enamoured by Katherine Applegate's Wishtree. Although being marketed as JF, it is an awesome read at any age. I loved Katherine Applegate's use of personification. Using an oak tree named Red as her narrator, she tells an inspired story of love and friendship, wishes and inclusion, and even religious tolerance. This is a well crafted story that uses short chapters, simple sentences, and reasonable vocabulary to reel in reluctant readers.

I've created a children's program about it geared towards 3rd to 6th graders. Sadly, the library was closed for snow in January when my program was scheduled to occur, but I will definitely be putting it on the schedule again when we do Fall program planning.


message 3: by Monica (new)

Monica | 4 comments Lynn, this sounds like such a great program. I hope you are able to have it. I really like Katherine Applegate as an author. I loved "The One and Only Ivan." Happy Reading!


message 4: by Meg (new)

Meg (navbrat) | 13 comments Mod
Lynn wrote: "I'm completely enamoured by Katherine Applegate's Wishtree. Although being marketed as JF, it is an awesome read at any age. I loved Katherine Applegate's use of personification. Using an oak tree ..."
That book came up at our last Reader's Advisory meeting, I definitely want to check it out!


message 5: by Lynn (new)

Lynn Meg, I'm the one who booktalked it at our last RA meeting. Lol.


message 6: by Meg (new)

Meg (navbrat) | 13 comments Mod
Lynn wrote: "Meg, I'm the one who booktalked it at our last RA meeting. Lol."

(*v*)


message 7: by Betsy (last edited Apr 07, 2018 08:44AM) (new)

Betsy | 14 comments Mod
It depends on the customer when I recommend, but I think a really good narrative nonfiction will cross gender lines, although I don't like to assume. Like When Breath Becomes Air or Mary Roach books. I always recommend Laura Hillenbrand books, especially Seabiscuit.


message 8: by Kim (new)

Kim (anguish) | 1 comments I have recommended You by Caroline Kepnes to everyone who's ever mentioned they like thrillers. It's creepy and character driven. Everyone who's read it at my suggestion has said it stuck with them!


message 9: by Synamon (new)

Synamon Better | 1 comments My go-to recommendation is always one of Chimamanda Adichie's books. I am a HUGE fan of Adichie. Her books "Dear Ijeawele or A Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions" and "We Should All Be Feminists" should be required reading for any adult - man or woman. It also helps that they're short reads so you can read them on lunch breaks. Another go-to recommendation of mine is Ta-Nehisi Coates' "Between The World & Me".


message 10: by Betsy (new)

Betsy | 14 comments Mod
Synamon wrote: "My go-to recommendation is always one of Chimamanda Adichie's books. I am a HUGE fan of Adichie. Her books "Dear Ijeawele or A Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions" and "We Should All Be Femin..."

I agree with all of these! :)


message 11: by Lenora (new)

Lenora | 1 comments I love Laura Hillenbrand too, I often recommend "Unbroken." I also really love "All the Light we Cannot See" and recommend that a lot. And anything by Kristin Hannah.


message 12: by Kisha (new)

Kisha | 2 comments So, I have a Go-To Author, Rick Riordan, in Children's!! I love all the books by him that I have read thus far! I also have a few YA series that I really enjoy - The Lunar Chronicles Series and Dorothy Must Die to name a couple. What I love is that all of these books can cross over! :-)


message 13: by Maggie (new)

Maggie Yankovich | 2 comments I think my must-read is "Frankenstein: Or, the Modern Prometheus" by Mary Shelley. The monster's struggle with being marginalized and demonized for his difference, is a theme that I think is near universal. Many people struggle with their own difference from the mainstream, or what is considered "normal." The monster's story can function as a metaphor for disability, gender non-conformity, and race--and I think it is an important text that can be a lens into such experiences.


message 14: by Meg (new)

Meg (navbrat) | 13 comments Mod
Maggie wrote: "I think my must-read is "Frankenstein: Or, the Modern Prometheus" by Mary Shelley. The monster's struggle with being marginalized and demonized for his difference, is a theme that I think is near u..."

Have you found the Mary Shelley is accessible for teens? I confess, I've only read the reimaginings and retellings, I'm a little intimidated by the original...even though the story fascinates me!


message 15: by Elena (new)

Elena Mats | 1 comments My recommendation is go beyond and read a non-fiction graphic novel. You will learn a ton through it in world history, political movements, science, and famous and not personality establishment. My top 5:
"Persepolis" by Marjane Satrapi
"Jerusalem" by Guy Delisle
"Feynman" by Jim Ottaviani
"The Photographer: Into War-torn Afghanistan with Doctors Without Borders" by Emmanuel Guibert
"The Best We Could Do" by Thi Bui


back to top