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Mar/Apr '18: Heart Berries > Sherman Alexie

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message 1: by MeerderWörter (new)

MeerderWörter | 2388 comments I found this really long and very in-depth article on Sherman Alexie, who wrote the foreword for Heart Berries.
Especially with MMIW and the general situation that Native American women are in, we cannot not take notice.

I encourage you all to read it.


Why Reading Sherman Alexie Was Never Enough:
As the #MeToo spotlight moves to Indian Country, epidemic violence against Native women meets tokenism in publishing.
By Jaqueline Keeler



message 2: by Pam (new)

Pam | 1080 comments Mod
Dag nab it!
Ughhh.

I had his books on my shelf to read.

Ughh the nerve! How grrrr. I can't. Gah!


message 3: by Leslie (new)

Leslie (lesliejean43) | 88 comments MeerderWörter wrote: "I found this really long and very in-depth article on Sherman Alexie, who wrote the foreword for Heart Berries.
Especially with MMIW and the general situation that Native American women are in, we ..."


Thank you for this excellent article!


message 4: by MeerderWörter (new)

MeerderWörter | 2388 comments Leslie wrote: "MeerderWörter wrote: "I found this really long and very in-depth article on Sherman Alexie, who wrote the foreword for Heart Berries.
Especially with MMIW and the general situation that Native Amer..."


You're very welcome!


message 5: by Lynn (new)

Lynn Lovegreen (lynn_lovegreen) I love his book The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian. I am so disappointed to hear of the awful things he's done.


message 6: by Maggie (last edited Mar 14, 2018 05:08PM) (new)

Maggie K | 5 comments This was interesting and sad. Actually, Alexie is a newcomer to the Native Literary scene in a lot of ways. People like Louise Erdrich,James Welch, Linda Hogan, Joy Harjo, N. Scott Momaday, David Treuer have put in the work and blood, sweat and tears that have made Native literature a real genre!


message 7: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl (vtlaoshi) | 1 comments Thank you for sharing this resource. I have been a fan of Alexie's for many years, but after reading this, I find it difficult to look at his work in the same way. Today in a department meeting we were discussing this very issue and we lamented the fact that it can be difficult to give up authors that we admire because of transgressions in their personal lives. I wonder to what extent it is possible to distance our feelings for an author's work from our reaction to their behavior? Despite my admiration for Alexie's writing, I can't help but feel that continued support of an individual who has assaulted women or sought to selfishly hold others back is an act of complicity.


message 8: by [deleted user] (new)

First I thought "what a bitter truth..." then I wondered is it true? I might be true but I prefer to have more information and more source to have a clear point of view on that question. I do not question the integrity of this article but life has taught me that people can manipulate other with information.

I also have to admit that if it the truth I would not be suprised. Some people claim to side with great causes while they are making grief and transgressions. Humans...


message 9: by MeerderWörter (new)

MeerderWörter | 2388 comments Florian wrote: "First I thought "what a bitter truth..." then I wondered is it true? I might be true but I prefer to have more information and more source to have a clear point of view on that question. I do not q..."

I can come up with more, if you want to... will just take a little time to go through my Twitter feed....


message 10: by [deleted user] (new)

Can you send it to me via private message please?

Sorry, I am not prompt at judging someone and I need more information to have a fair opinion about a tough situation unless an quick action is needed.


message 12: by [deleted user] (new)

Thank you so much. I'll read those references as well ;)


message 13: by Sierra (new)

Sierra | 42 comments Wow! Thanks for posting this - I never would have known - and I'm even a fan of Keeler's! She edited a collection of work called "The Edge of Morning: Native Voices Speak for the Bears Ears", which I highly recommend if you are concerned about the US Public Lands.

Knowing this news about Alexie, I can't help but find the sad irony in him writing the introduction to this book in particular.


message 14: by Lynn (new)

Lynn Lovegreen (lynn_lovegreen) The American Indian Library Association rescinded its 2008 Young Adult Literature Award from Sherman Alexie. See the statement here: https://americanindiansinchildrenslit...


message 15: by Jenny (new)

Jenny I am really enjoying reading this book for the most part but the presence of him in the book is making me really uncomfortable now. I'm pushing through and continuing to read because I want to know her story but his presence in this is making me extremely conflicted about how I feel about this one.


message 16: by nil (new)

nil (nilnil) Thank you for sharing this. I have been taking a little sabbatical from social media, and so I hadn't seen this on twitter yet. Alexie has been very prominent in my community because of our proximity and work with the Idaho tribes. This made me very sad. I am very curious what Terese Mailhot thinks of this, but I understand that it must be really complex (especially considering her other traumas and issues with mental illness) for her. The presence of Alexie in her book only served to create another layer to her story for me. He was an important mentor to her, and now this may be another betrayal of trust that is unintentionally displayed in her memoir. It doesn't really change how I felt about Heart Berries, but I do think in the coming months her reaction to this might.


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