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message 1: by English (last edited Jul 23, 2014 12:39AM) (new)

English  (english_lady) | 19 comments I've noticed that a significant number of Christian Historical Novels that include British characters, or are set partly in Britain almost always seem to culminate in that said character going to live in America, even if they happen to be male.
Or else have the American protagonist taking his/her new British spouse back home, abandoning any responsibilities or free of any ties that bound him Britain, or bought him/her there in the first place.

Or another plot device is a (usually female) protagonist who gets into trouble at home and flees to- surprise, surprise, the USA! Myself, I think it would be easier and more plausible to just go to another part of Britain- but no, it seemingly has to be America.

So, my question is, why is this so often the case in fiction?

Is is simply a (somewhat overused) plot device authors rely on to incorporate a British character into an American setting, or to include them in future stories? Is it a requirement?
Or is is somehow believed America is 'better' and 'superior' to Britain because its seen as having been such an awful place in the past that nobody could possibly want to stay there and moving to America was infinitely preferable?


message 2: by Jack (new)

Jack Cavanaugh (novelistjack) | 28 comments Anna -- For me, it was part of a larger design to write an American history series, Book 1, The Puritans, was set during the colonial movement to America. I considered starting in the Netherlands with the pilgrims, but another author had done that recently. (However, I did write a novel in which that same group sent colonists to South Africa, The Pride and the Passion.)

That said, I wrote two novels that started and ended in England during the writing of English versions of the Bible. Glimpses of Truth and Beyond the Sacred Page. The latter features a middle-age love story, which brings up a related point to your point. Why do most stories have to be about young love?


message 3: by Katie (new)

Katie | 22 comments Anna-
I am not an author, I am a reader and a history nerd. From what I have learned in history classes and from books I've read, fiction and non-fiction, America was seen as a beacon of freedom freedom and opportunity. In England, one had to be born into nobility to be noble and own land and have money. America offered the chance to work your way up. Anyone can become rich if they worked hard. Also, the church of England was very corrupy, so America was a place of religious freedom. The pilgrims & Puritans settled Massachusetts, the Quakers settled Pennyslvania, many Catholics and Ana-baptist also settled in America. America promised more opportunity and freedom and wealth than the class system and societal restrictions of Britain. Obviously, it wasn't that easy but for those immigranting, it was hope.
And it does provide an interesting story for authors to write about and sets up sequels and series.


message 4: by AlegnaB † (new)

AlegnaB † (alegnab) In addition to what Jack and Katie have said, perhaps it's also because most of the authors are American. They know some British history since we learn some of that in school, but they're much more familiar and comfortable with U.S. history.


message 5: by English (last edited Aug 05, 2014 01:42AM) (new)

English  (english_lady) | 19 comments Katie wrote: "Anna-
I am not an author, I am a reader and a history nerd. From what I have learned in history classes and from books I've read, fiction and non-fiction, America was seen as a beacon of freedom f..."


I understand, but I have to say this is something of a myth. Freedom was not invented in America or by the founding fathers of the USA, and in fact many of the notions of Freedom established in the US had existed and developed in Europe and Britain centuries before.
British Kings and Queens were not absolute monarchs, contrary to popular belief, and the basis of the British political system is rule and supremacy of law, which has existed since the time of Henry II and King John. What does Magna Carta say 'To not shall be sell, to none delay or deny right or justice' and 'No free man shall be imprisoned, or depiived of liberty except by lawful judgement of his peers and the law of the land' to use my own paraphrase.

Magna Carta wasn't drawn up by Americans, or signed by George Washington. It was a reaction to a tyrannical ruler by his subjects and nobles, underscored by the idea that nobody- not even the King- was above the law.
Indeed, we declared war on and beheaded a King because he went against custom and Constitution to believe he could exercise arbitrary power without the consent or co-operation of parliament.

Furthermore, one did not have to be 'born into the nobility' to own land and money- this is also a myth, more akin to the situation that was common in the Feudal era of the eleventh and twelfth century than the seventeenth or nineteenth century.

Social climbing and self- betterment was quite possible- in fact even in the Middle Ages several prominent noble families were in fact descended from peasants or commoners.
They rose through the ranks through good marriages, buying up land, or sending their children to school to become lawyers or into the service of a nobleman.

Indeed, 'professional' self-made people like lawyers or those of certain professions and backgrounds, like traders, merchants, mill-owners etc could do very well for themselves indeed. These were not necessarily born into the nobility (indeed, if they had worked in manual professions they certainly would not be) but they owned land any money.

So it would seem to me that the reasons for setting most novels in America are based on myth and misinformation about the realities of British culture and society.
There was social inequality and periods of persecution, certainly, but these exist in many societies- including, dare I say it, America.


message 6: by English (new)

English  (english_lady) | 19 comments Jack wrote: "Anna -- For me, it was part of a larger design to write an American history series, Book 1, The Puritans, was set during the colonial movement to America. I considered starting in the Netherlands w..."

I have actually read Glimpses of Truth. It was Okay, but I did not agree with some of the things in it. The peasants beliefs seemed to resemble modern socialism and communism far too much to be plausible for instance, and dare I say, it imposed American notions of 'freedom' and republicanism onto the past.

What I was taught of the Peasant's Revolt was that those involved actually claimed to be loyal subjects of the King, they did not want to get rid of him, and create an autonomous republic. They just wanted to be rid of the 'wicked counselors' who they blamed for social ills or unjust laws.

and most were not true peasants- they were of the Middle Classes.
People from towns, merchants, craftsmen, priests and country squires- not serfs and villains. In fact, serfdom and the traditional from of feudalism was really dying out at that time.

My main point is that it was a different time and a different culture,with different attitudes, values and ideals. I was taught not to judge the past by modern standards, and really, in some way the founding fathers espoused the values and beliefs of the eighteenth century, including deism, non-conformity and violent revolution.

It does not pay to apply or impose these to other periods or cultures- but this seems to happen all too often.


message 7: by AlegnaB † (new)

AlegnaB † (alegnab) anna wrote: "Freedom was not invented in America or by the founding fathers of the USA, and in fact many of the notions of Freedom established in the US had existed and developed in Europe and Britain centuries before..."

Nobody claimed that freedom was invented in America or by the founding fathers of the U.S. Most U.S. citizens know that if there had been no Great Britain, there wouldn't have been a U.S.A. When I was in school and studying U.S. history, we learned British history in relation to U.S. history, plus we learned quite a bit of British history in world history class. We learned about the Magna Carta.

In Virginia, we have historic sites dedicated to educating our citizens about, among other things, the British beginnings of our country. We have:

Historic Jamestowne: http://www.historicjamestowne.org (quote from the website: "The mission of Historic Jamestowne is to preserve, protect and promote the original site of the first permanent English settlement in North America and to tell the story of the role of the three cultures, European, North American and African, that came together to lay the foundation for a uniquely American form of democratic government, language, free enterprise and society.")

Jamestown Settlement: http://www.historyisfun.org/Jamestown...

Colonial Williamsburg: http://history.org/

Virginia has other historic sites from the colonial era. Most of them are homes that belonged to important people of colonial times, and of course, they were British citizens, since there was not yet a U.S.A. There are other states with historical sites that also include information about our British history.

We recognize that we don't have an untarnished history of everyone being free and considered equal in worth to everyone else. Slavery and what was done to the Native Americans are just two things to regret about our history. But all nations are made up of sinful people, so no nation has ever been perfect or ever will be.

Millions upon millions of people have come and still come from countries all over the world, including Great Britain, to the United States seeking (more?) freedom and opportunity to improve their lives and the lives of their progeny.


message 8: by Rachael (new)

Rachael (rachsramblings) | 32 comments My own relatives came here because they could actually own their own piece of property. The British elite had a great disdain for " the colonies." However, the rest didn't...especially those who sought religious freedom. If you travel abroad today, it is common for people to view you as rich just because I come from America. Even if we aren't rich in the eyes of Americans...we have far more than those in other countries. Many in England and Ireland, from where my ancestors come, viewed America as a place to follow their dreams and own their own land. Few in Britain actually owned their homes. It was a beacon of hope for many...and it still is.


message 9: by Rachael (new)

Rachael (rachsramblings) | 32 comments . Also in early American history certain Religious groups still persecuted others. I know many authors write about their own ancestry which traveled to America. Some for freedom...some were actually villians that escaped to the colonies.


message 10: by Jack (new)

Jack Cavanaugh (novelistjack) | 28 comments anna wrote: "My main point is that it was a different time and a different culture,with different attitudes, values and ideals."

Excellent point, Anna! Thanks for your comments. Very insightful.

Whenever I write about a different culture, I always do so with a mixture of excitement and fear and trembling. Excitement, because I love, love, love the research. Fear and trembling because . . . well, you've put your finger on it, haven't you? I want to do the people and the historical period justice and don't always succeed.

No excuses, but sometimes the less than satisfactory results lie in the constraints of being a midlist author. I'm given six months and 90,000 words to research and write each novel. Before writing Glimpses, I was writing about colonial South Africa; following Glimpses, I wrote novels set in Tudor England and Hitler's Germany. Compare that to two of my favorite bestselling historical fiction authors.

Herman Wouk took seven years and 250,000+ words to craft Winds of War, having traveled to every location in the novel. In addition to on-sight research where he interviewed experts, James Michener had a team of university student researchers assisting him for each of his massive novels. (Sigh. Be still my heart.)

While I don't (yet, here's hoping someday) have that kind of time and resources, I do depend on knowledgeable readers like you. Don't be surprised to hear from me should I get another contract for historical fiction set in England.


message 11: by English (new)

English  (english_lady) | 19 comments Rachael wrote: "My own relatives came here because they could actually own their own piece of property. The British elite had a great disdain for " the colonies." However, the rest didn't...especially those who so..."

Perhaps this is due, in part at least to geography. There was simply more free space to be had in America, whereas in Britain there is not so much to go around, so to speak.

I still disagree in some point about land ownership- the aristocracy, especially in the modern era, were nothing like the all-powerful autocrats they are sometimes presented as. Many had to sell off land because of financial problems, and many built their own houses if they could. Of course there were tenants, and with the industrial Revolution and greater movement into cities, many new settlements were built for workers and such.

I think it might have been more a case of being able to own vast swathes of land and not encroaching on anyone else's perhaps.


message 12: by English (new)

English  (english_lady) | 19 comments Jack wrote: "anna wrote: "My main point is that it was a different time and a different culture,with different attitudes, values and ideals."

Excellent point, Anna! Thanks for your comments. Very insightful.

..."


Oh yes, research is a LOT of work, and frankly I only know many of the things I do from my degree- so thanks to the research of others- and the Amazing person one of my Professors was. It makes me laugh a little when people say there are 'hardly any records' or evidence from the Middle Ages- after about 1200 there is a vast amount. They just probably haven't had to grapple with it.....

I supposed in some way in can be difficult to be entirely detached from the values and ideals our culture has 'hard wired' into us.


message 13: by English (last edited Aug 05, 2014 01:25PM) (new)

English  (english_lady) | 19 comments Alegnab wrote: "anna wrote: "Freedom was not invented in America or by the founding fathers of the USA, and in fact many of the notions of Freedom established in the US had existed and developed in Europe and Brit..."

I think some Americans do believe differently- regarding Britain with arrogant disdain even verging on hatred as if it were some feudal backwater or the very foundry of 'tyranny'. For Britain generally read 'England' as the Scots or Irish are almost never cast the the bad guys in that way....

Furthermore, as I mentioned to Jack Cavanaugh, I think most of us are culturally 'hard wired' to see things in a certain way. So perhaps British history is taught with an emphasis on inequality or the perceived 'betterness' of American culture...I don't know? Certainly its not correct that only the nobility could own land.

Certainly a lot of people did view America as a place to make a fresh start with good reasons- but I suppose I would like to see a little more balance and less predictability in fiction with the leading couple always ending up settling in America.....and maybe more 'normal English folk rather than aristocrats.

Then there's the matter of the war of 1812, which I won't even get started on or I may rant for ages.....


message 14: by Jack (new)

Jack Cavanaugh (novelistjack) | 28 comments anna wrote: "It makes me laugh a little when people say there are 'hardly any records' or evidence from the Middle Ages-"

Hardly any records??? That is funny. Could spend a lifetime . . . many do. And we're the beneficiaries, aren't we? Sometimes I regret not going the academic route. Would have loved to have traveled to England to study.


message 15: by Rachael (new)

Rachael (rachsramblings) | 32 comments My family came to get enough land to live off the land...and to gain religious freedom. They settled in Maine. A lot of Puritans settled here. Yes, some came to get a large piece of land to fulfill their desire so be free, work the land, and be self sufficient on it. Free from taxes and government interference in their lives. Since so many here in America, have descendants like mine, it us commonly written about people coming to America. Laurainne Snelling has a whole host of books with the beginning of the series being her ancestors coming to America to own land and be free. They, however, came from around Sweden ( if I remember right.) Many authors simply get their inspiration for the stories they know of their ancestors when writing historical fiction.


message 16: by Jack (new)

Jack Cavanaugh (novelistjack) | 28 comments Rachael wrote: "Laurainne Snelling has a whole host of books . . . "

Rachael, you're correct. Lauraine writes about Scandinavian families. Consequently, she has a loyal reader following in Minnesota and Wisconsin where many of those families settled. Not only is Lauraine a gifted writer, but a wonderful woman and good friend.


message 17: by Rachael (new)

Rachael (rachsramblings) | 32 comments Jack wrote: "Rachael wrote: "Laurainne Snelling has a whole host of books . . . "

Rachael, you're correct. Lauraine writes about Scandinavian families. Consequently, she has a loyal reader following in Minneso..."


Jack, I have all of those books! I love them because I think of my ancestors and how difficult it must have been! She makes it all seem so real!


message 18: by John (new)

John Jr. | 61 comments Jack wrote: "anna wrote: "My main point is that it was a different time and a different culture,with different attitudes, values and ideals."

Excellent point, Anna! Thanks for your comments. Very insightful.
I love research too, Jack. I don't think I could research and write a long piece of historical fiction in nine months, though, as I'd probably have to go without food for days at a time.
..."



message 19: by AlegnaB † (new)

AlegnaB † (alegnab) anna wrote: "I think some Americans do believe differently- regarding Britain with arrogant disdain even verging on hatred as if it were some feudal backwater or the very foundry of 'tyranny'...So perhaps British history is taught with an emphasis on inequality or the perceived 'betterness' of American culture..."

Well, that's probably true, since in a population so large, you're bound to find plenty of people who have a particular viewpoint.

We used to be taught in schools that our form of government is best. That helped inspire patriotism. But our teachers also gave credit to the British for our form of government, since ours came out of yours. I have no idea what is taught in schools today, since I'm a homeschooling mom, and my four children have never gone to school (until college/university).

I think most Americans think well of Great Britain and its people. Your queen got a good reception when she visited Colonial Williamsburg in 2007 and probably also during her first visit, which was in 1957 (but I have no memory of that visit, since I wasn't born yet). We Americans sure watch a lot of your TV programs and read a lot of your books. We love your accents. :-)

Rachael wrote: "Laurainne Snelling has a whole host of books with the beginning of the series being her ancestors coming to America to own land and be free. They, however, came from around Sweden..."

I have quite a few Lauraine Snelling books on my to-read shelf because I've gotten free Kindle books and my local library has a bunch of her books. I'll have to start a series soon.


message 20: by AlegnaB † (new)

AlegnaB † (alegnab) Rachael wrote: "...Laurainne Snelling has a whole host of books with the beginning of the series being her ancestors coming to America to own land and be free. They, however, came from around Sweden ( if I remember right.) ..."

They were from Norway. This is from her website: "Her Norwegian heritage spurred her to craft An Untamed Land, volume one of the Red River of the North family saga and a trilogy called Return to Red River, as well as the Daughters of Blessing series, and the Home to Blessing series. Due to reader demand she is currently working on another Blessing series."


message 21: by Rachael (new)

Rachael (rachsramblings) | 32 comments Alegnab wrote: "Rachael wrote: "...Laurainne Snelling has a whole host of books with the beginning of the series being her ancestors coming to America to own land and be free. They, however, came from around Swede..."

Yes, I figured that out...I actually have them on a bookcase that I'm looking at right now. Jack commented on it so I didn't bother responding to my own post. :) probably should have. They are amazing reads....especially the first ones that tell of the hardships they faced when first arriving in America. Great series...highly recommend.


message 22: by AlegnaB † (new)

AlegnaB † (alegnab) Jack said they were Scandanavian, but that didn't narrow it down to the specific country, so that's why I looked it up and responded. I figured that other people reading the thread would like to know, too. I'm glad you didn't respond, because that caused me to look it up on L. Snelling's website. While there, I looked at her book list and found helpful information that her GR pages didn't have.

I started my L. Snelling listening with the first book in the fourth Bjorklund family series, not realizing that other series preceded it. The series pages on GR didn't have info about various series being related. I didn't think then about checking out the author's website. Now I'll have some spoilers when I get to the third series and maybe before. I hate spoilers. I added info about the series to the top of the GR series pages (for example, to the Home to Blessing page I added "Fourth Bjorklund family series") so that GR users will be able to see that there may be other series that should be read prior to a particular series.


message 23: by English (new)

English  (english_lady) | 19 comments "We love your accents. :-)

Well actually, there are many different accents in England- and used to be a lot more.
It could be joked that movies tend to only depict four- Posh, cockney, Scottish and bad Irish- and sometimes the actors who are obviously Americans switch between them. I guess they find Irish easiest....


message 24: by English (last edited Aug 15, 2014 10:30AM) (new)

English  (english_lady) | 19 comments On a related issue one source of annoyance for me in many Christian Regencies is Americanisms in the language of the ostensibly 'British' characters- such as saying 'someplace' or calling trousers 'pants'. I know its to be expected that American authors use terms that they are familiar with- but I still find it jarring.... and then there was the series in which even the British characters could not seem to distinguish between England and Britain.

Don't even get me started on references flora, fauna or foodstuffs indigenous to the Americas I have spotted in books set in Britain or Europe set before Columbus.
Perhaps its just me, but secular historical fiction does not seem to have these problems though I do not read a lot of it. It could give the impression that the level of research which goes into Christian fiction is lower.


message 25: by AlegnaB † (new)

AlegnaB † (alegnab) anna wrote: ""We love your accents. :-)

Well actually, there are many different accents in England..."


I know. There are probably very few countries that don't have lots of regional accents.

Some of your actors do American accents very well. I had no idea that Marsha Thomason of White Collar is British until I saw it on IMDB. It was strange hearing her speak with her native accent in an episode. :-)

anna wrote: "...one source of annoyance for me in many Christian Regencies is Americanisms in the language of the ostensibly 'British' characters..."

Does Americanized spelling bother you? I'm sure there's also a lot of that in regencies authored by Americans.


message 26: by English (new)

English  (english_lady) | 19 comments AlegnaB wrote: "anna wrote: ""We love your accents. :-)

Well actually, there are many different accents in England..."

I know. There are probably very few countries that don't have lots of regional accents.

So..."



No, Americanized spelling does not bother me that is to be expected.
Rather I was referring to mean terms and phrases that British people in the 19th century would not have used because they are more common in American English, and are rarely used even today.

Many British actors can do American accents (well except perhaps David McLeod of 'Doctor Who' fame....), but generally few American actors can maintain a convincing British accent- few that I know of anyhow.
I believe the problem is they try to speak in a ridiculously exaggerated version of a 'British' accent that even few Brits would be able to do well.


message 27: by John (last edited Oct 26, 2014 02:50PM) (new)

John Jr. | 61 comments anna wrote: "AlegnaB wrote: "anna wrote: ""We love your accents. :-)

Well actually, there are many different accents in England..."

I know. There are probably very few countries that don't have lots of region..."


anna wrote: "AlegnaB wrote: "anna wrote: ""We love your accents. :-)

Well actually, there are many different accents in England..."

I know. There are probably very few countries that don't have lots of region..."


anna wrote: "AlegnaB wrote: "anna wrote: ""We love your accents. :-)

Well actually, there are many different accents in England..."

I know. There are probably very few countries that don't have lots of region..."


Anna,

As an interesting note regarding your post, the American actor Dick Van Dyke, in a recent interview, said he did a terrible cockney accent in the movie MARY POPPINS, in which he co-starred with Julie Andrews. On the other hand, Vivien Leigh did a wonderful Southern accent in GONE WITH THE WIND. Since I am an American Southerner, I speak with some authority, I believe, regarding Miss Leigh's accent.


message 28: by MaryJo (new)

MaryJo Dawson | 43 comments Interesting comments on accents and on British terminology.
My first cozy took place, in part, in England. One of my reviews criticized the use of a couple of terms, like 'old chap', thinking it was not realistic. But I visited Great Britain shortly before writing that, and our tour guide and others often used the words that I did.


message 29: by John (last edited Oct 28, 2014 05:03PM) (new)

John Jr. | 61 comments If I were writing a story with a Russian character who spoke English, I wouldn't let him/her use the articles "a," "an," or "the." While some English-speaking Russians do use those articles, I'd venture to say that most don't. Why? Because articles are nowhere to be found in the Russian language. I studied it in college for three years, and that was one of the first peculiarities of the language I learned. The summer after my first year of study, I went to the then-Soviet Union and none of my tour guides, as I recall, used the articles. A fellow tourist asked me why, and so I explained what I'd learned. For example, when it was time for us to return to our tour bus, our guide would always say: "We go to bus now." Just something to keep in mind in case someone wants to feature a Russian character in one of their books. I'm no Russian expert -- it's been years since I studied it -- but I do remember this one peculiarity in the language.


message 30: by English (new)

English  (english_lady) | 19 comments John wrote: "anna wrote: "AlegnaB wrote: "anna wrote: ""We love your accents. :-)

Well actually, there are many different accents in England..."

I know. There are probably very few countries that don't have l..."



Yes, I am aware that its something of an irony that whilst many American actors cannot do convincing British accents, a lot of British actors can do American accents- sometimes accents so impeccable you would have no idea of their real nationality.

I myself believe that its because actors like Dick Van Dyke are trying to replicate very distinctive or accents, usually such as Cockney, or exaggerated high class accents
that are hard to pull of at the best of times- whereas most British actors speak with accent known as Standard English, which is not the ridiculous high class one you hear in movies, but, is quite a neutral one.
As such, its probably easier adopt different accents.

Maybe its a matter of different levels of training too. I hear that many actors in this country have a lot of training and practice in the theatre.

I have a bit of a joke that in Hollywood movies there are only four kinds of accents in the British Isles- cockney, posh, Scottish and bad Irish.


message 31: by English (new)

English  (english_lady) | 19 comments MaryJo wrote: "Interesting comments on accents and on British terminology.
My first cozy took place, in part, in England. One of my reviews criticized the use of a couple of terms, like 'old chap', thinking it wa..."


Some people still do (though very few I must say)- but you still find people of the old school or older generation who may speak in a manner that seems quite stereotypical- then you have the real posh people of course...

What is amusing is movies set in the Medieval period that have English characters with ridiculously posh, exaggerated accents, when most would actually have spoken French at that time......


message 32: by John (new)

John Jr. | 61 comments I am a huge CS Forester fan, but when Gregory Peck made a Hornblower movie in which he played the lead character, I couldn't watch it. He was too American for the role.


message 33: by English (new)

English  (english_lady) | 19 comments John wrote: "I am a huge CS Forester fan, but when Gregory Peck made a Hornblower movie in which he played the lead character, I couldn't watch it. He was too American for the role."

I saw that one-though it didn't really register. Ioan Grufudd (pronounced Griffith) was better in the mini-series that was done quite a few years back- who is Welsh of course, the clue being in the name....


message 34: by John (new)

John Jr. | 61 comments anna wrote: "John wrote: "I am a huge CS Forester fan, but when Gregory Peck made a Hornblower movie in which he played the lead character, I couldn't watch it. He was too American for the role."

I saw that on..."


I totally agree!


message 35: by MaryJo (new)

MaryJo Dawson | 43 comments anna wrote: "MaryJo wrote: "Interesting comments on accents and on British terminology.
My first cozy took place, in part, in England. One of my reviews criticized the use of a couple of terms, like 'old chap',..."

Didn't I read somewhere that one of the English kings came to the throne speaking only German? Perhaps George III?


message 36: by English (new)

English  (english_lady) | 19 comments MaryJo wrote: "anna wrote: "MaryJo wrote: "Interesting comments on accents and on British terminology.
My first cozy took place, in part, in England. One of my reviews criticized the use of a couple of terms, lik..."


Possibly- although I've also read that Richard the Lionheart, who is often presented as 'English' could not even speak the Language and was more French than anything else- like most of the Kings from about 1066 .....


message 37: by David (new)

David Jack (smeagolthemagnificent) English wrote: ""We love your accents. :-)

Well actually, there are many different accents in England- and used to be a lot more.
It could be joked that movies tend to only depict four- Posh, cockney, Scottish a..."


There are actually many different accents in Scotland, although Americans, and to a lesser extent, the English, may get the impression there's only Glaswegian-since most prominent Scots in TV and film (Billy Connolly, James MacAvoy, David Tennant etc) tend to be Glasgow born.


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