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A Peek at Bathsheba (The David Chronicles #2)
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message 1: by Uvi (new) - rated it 5 stars

Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments Later, when I start awakening from my slumber, the first thing I sense is her touch. Or is it the memory of her touch? I fumble, I reach for it, rolling into the dent in the mattress, which is where she used to lie. I wonder where she is, and why her absence screams at me so crisply, even as I curl myself into the crimson bedspread.
Alas, reality is such a fluid, fleeting thing when you find yourself as old as I am.
Bathsheba is gone, but her voice still echoes in my head. It is still resonating around me in the chamber, whispering softly, “I beg you: show me you still care. Read the scroll. Do it now, David, because this you must realize: my life, and the life of our son, are both in grave danger.”
The scroll has been hanging by a thread from Goliath’s sword up there over my head, but now it has fallen next to my pillow. With some effort I break the seal. Even so I do not care to read it, or to deal with danger, at my age. She should know that. At his point, the present is such a boring thing for me. Not so the past: I ask myself, over and again, what happened? How in heaven’s name did it come to this?
Was it not just yesterday when I was standing there, in my court, beaming a wide smile at the sight of my handsome, mischievous little boys as they came running to me, as they pushed each other aside, simply to cling to my hand?
And didn’t Bathsheba raise the baby, then—ever so gently—from his little crib, and let me cradle him in my arms, for the first time? Was it all a dream, nothing more than a yearning for a new beginning?


David in A Peek at Bathsheba

My novel is greatly influenced by art. Here is an oil painting by Govert Flinck, Bathsheba makes an appeal to David. It depicts a scene similar to the excerpt above, perhaps a scene that happened just an hour earlier, when an aging Bathsheba pleads before David. Here, he pays her full attention, to the point of pushing the young Abishag, who takes care of him, away.



★ Just released! Volume II of the trilogy ★
A Peek at Bathsheba
★ Audio ★ EbookPrint
"The richness of her descriptive language, to me, evokes a sense of majesty that seems, well, biblical."


message 2: by Uvi (new) - rated it 5 stars

Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments At the height of the lunar cycle, when the moon grows full once again, I give in to temptation. I go out onto the roof, where I hope, in vain, to catch a glimpse of her. And just as I start agonizing, asking myself how long can our secret be kept silent, an interruption occurs.
My bodyguard, Benaiah, comes out. I want to believe that he knows nothing about me except what orders I give him, and how I want them obeyed.
When he comes to a stand near me I spot a note in his hand. I recognize it: this is the same little papyrus scroll I sent with him that first time, a month ago, but she must have sealed it anew.
I break the seal and then, then I stare at the unfurled thing, utterly speechless. It takes just three words to get me into this state.
In long, elegant glyphs, Bathsheba has written, simply, “I am pregnant.”


David in A Peek at Bathsheba

The correspondence between David and Bathsheba is the invention of artists, whose mind was tickled to imagine how the two lovers communicated to try and prevent a public scandal. Here is the work of two great artists, Rembrandt's Bathsheba at her bath, and Picasso's version based on Rembrandt's. Compare how he makes Bathsheba lean forward, emphasizing her keen attention to the letter, and how he plays with the patterns so that the entire space is abuzz with energy.

Rembrandt, Bathsheba at her bath


Picasso, Bathsheba at her bath


Just released! Volume II of The David Chronicles trilogy:
A Peek at Bathsheba
EbookPrint


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Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments History is written by the winners. They make sure to remove that version of history that belongs to the losers. David, the young entertainer coming to play his lyre in king Saul’s court, makes this point in Rise to Power:

Hung on the wall is an shiny iron shield. I brush my fingers over the sharp ridges of the engraved inscription, trying to figure it out by touch.
It says, The House of Kish. To a naive observer it may seem like an emblem of a highly respected ancestry—but as everyone around the country knows, Saul has no royal blood in his veins. He is the son of Kish, a lowly farmer who owns but a few asses. In his youth Saul used to tend to these stubborn animals.
He may long for those carefree days. Even so, word on the street is that he did a lousy job, because the asses got lost more often than not. Everyone hopes and prays that he will do better as a king.
The worst part is, his family comes from a tribe of ill-repute. The tribe of Benjamin is known to be nothing but a rowdy mob, notorious for an insatiable appetite for rape and murder, for which it was severely punished. In a fierce civil war, it was nearly wiped out—not so long ago—by the other tribes.
For the life of me I cannot figure why the first king of Israel should be picked from the poor, the downtrodden. It is a questionable political decision—but perhaps it is better this way. In the back of his mind Saul should know his humble beginnings. He should feel compassion for his subjects, even though at this point all I sense out of him is rage and jealousy.
He is the son of a simple farmer, which makes this emblem quite pretentious. But who cares? By instinct I get it, I understand his need to display the thing, because this is the way to create history, when none is available.


Even when the winner’s version of history makes it to the books, it is modified by later generations, adding layers upon layers of interpretation. So when I select old yarn to give it a new twist, I always focus on the human aspect: my biblically-inspired characters are no heroes. They are modern men and women, who at times find the courage to do heroic acts; at times they are besieged by emotions of grief, jealousy, or overwhelming passion; and always, they ponder who they are with the doubts and hesitations that are familiar to all of us.

Here, for example, is what Yankle--the main character in my book A Favorite Son, inspired by the biblical figure of Jacob--says about who he is.

I like to think of myself as a modern man. A confused one. One left to his own devices, because of one thing: the silence of God. When Isaac, my father, lay on his deathbed, waiting for me, or rather, for his favorite son to come in, he suspected, somehow, that he was about to be fooled. And yet, God kept silent. Now, all these years later, I wonder about it.
God did not help the old man. He gave no warning to him, not one whisper in his ear, not a single clue. Now as then, He is utterly still, and will not alert me when my time comes, when they, my sons, flesh of my flesh, blood of my blood, are ready to face me, to fool their old man.




Like reading? Get these books
Just released! Volume II of the trilogy:
A Peek at Bathsheba

Volume I of the trilogy:
Rise to Power

Other biblically-inspired books:
A Favorite SonA Favorite Son
Twisted


message 4: by Uvi (new) - rated it 5 stars

Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments Renee Giraldy is a prolific, avid reader, and she posts her reviews on her lovely Reading Renee blog. I feel so grateful to find what she wrote about my novel, A Peek at Bathsheba:

★★★★★ Historical and political must read novel, August 12, 2014
By Reading Renee "Reading Renee" (Southern California)
Verified Purchase

Uvi Poznansky gets yet another five big stars from me. I really enjoyed this book more because I have just came off a few Rock Band type reads and I felt educated in reading this.
“A Peek at Bathsheba” by Uvi Poznansky is so different from other books I have read. Its a blending of history, non-fiction and fiction. I truly enjoyed the author's style. For the first time in a long time I didnt see grammar issues, run on sentences or typos.
David is a very complex and difficult character to learn about. Here the author takes much of his persona and creates a tale based on some classics. I dont want people to think this is a religious novel. It is much more of a creation based on the King we know as David. Apart from the David I am aware of I learned about some personal tragedy here too. It sort of slides along a thin line of what you think is actual history and what you think is actual fiction. David was a write, an amazing musician, a poet, and so much more.
What I loved was how we see him and his wives, which is a different concept to me. I liked him falling in love. I still find it hard to believe it was a cultural thing to have more than one spouse, but who knows maybe more people should!
IF you want another very well written novel that inspires thinking, then yes grab this one. I think people who like history based reads will just love it. If you like history with a political type undertone, then grab it.

Get ★★★★★ A PEEK AT BATHSHEBA
♥ Ebook http://BookShow.me/B00LEPPDV6
♥ Print http://BookShow.me//0984993274

A Peek at Bathsheba (The David Chronicles, #2) by Uvi Poznansky


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Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments A year ago, the chief architect for my palace became overly inventive, which is something I welcome. He suggested to embellish the look of my tower by adding an external staircase, with each stair projecting outward from the wall—which would be seen by everyone, from every hill surrounding the city, no matter how far. At the time I thought it was a good idea, because that would leave the internal staircase as a private approach to my chamber, to be used by me alone.
I approved his plan, because as a poet I enjoy solitude, and as a politician I need to relieve myself—on occasion—from the pressure of dealing with the crowds.
Once constructed, I found it offered one more advantage, which I had not foreseen before. The staircase put those who climbed up to my office on public display. It helped make them know their place once they got here.
For the most part, this works in my favor.
Since many of those who come happen to be of the opposite sex, my interest in them becomes truly notorious, whether I deserve it or not. For a king, this is not a bad thing. Depending upon whom you ask about it, my virility is hated, envied, or else, much revered.
So now when Bathsheba, my new bride, comes to me from the women’s quarters, she does it the same way as the rest of my wives.
Bending over the sill of my chamber window I spot her clambering up, slowly and heavily, around the tower.
She stops for a minute to wipe her brow, because the heat of this summer is more intense than usual. Short of breath, she holds one hand on the iron railing, and the other around her belly. On her, the climb takes its toll.
Bathsheba lowers her eyes and gives a shy, hesitant nod to one concubine after another, as they are coming down, measuring her top to bottom, and flinging their skirts about, with a happy whistle on their lips.
That uneasy scramble to the top has the questionable effect of humbling her. By the time she arrives, there are tears in her eyes.

David in A Peek at Bathsheba

This excerpt is inspired by a painting of Bathsheba in one of the frescos based on the life of king David painted by Salviati at the Palazzo Sacchetti in Rome. Salviati moves this story forward to the time she has come to the palace to see David. This inspired me to write of the reality Bathsheba must face once she comes to the palace, as one of many wives and concubines.

"What's next in store for King David? I am sure in the third and final book of this trilogy, we are about to find out!


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Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments Next morning I sit down at my desk to write a letter to Joav. “Put Uriah out in front,” I write, “where the fighting is fiercest.”
I take a deep breath, dip my feather in ink and shake it, that it may not bleed.
“Then,” I go on writing, “withdraw from him, so he will be struck down and die.”
I seal the scroll and give it to my dear, trusty soldier, knowing he would never suspect he is carrying his own death sentence in his hand.
And for a long time after the sound of his steps has died down I remain there, sitting at the edge of my throne, listening for him, hoping he would come back to me, wishing I could find a way to save him.


David in A Peek at Bathsheba

This is the moment that David signs the death sentence for his soldier Uriah, and lets him carry it unknowingly to his commander, so his life would be placed in jeopardy on the battlefield.

I slowed this moment down, quite deliberately, by having him pause to take care of his pen so it does not bleed, while he is contemplating shedding the blood of his soldier. At this point David can still change his mind, still refrain from betraying Uriah over the love of his woman, Bathsheba. The crime has not been committed, yet. Watching him from the shadows, we would be tempted to cry out, Stop! There's still time, don't do this! Don't put pen to papyrus!

To me, the contemplation of a crime is more interesting than the crime itself. This moment in David's story is so pregnant with possibilities that it inspired many artists to capture it on canvas, which inspires me in writing my novel. Here are two paintings by Pieter Lastman, a Dutch painter of historical pieces (his pupils included Rembrandt.) In the first painting, David hands the letter to his kneeling soldier, and the relationship between them seems, to all appearances, like one between a benevolent ruler and an obedient subject--if not for the reaction of the boy (who may be a young scribe, or his son) who raises his eyes in great alarm. Like us, he is holding himself back from shouting, Stop!

The second painting depicts the same moment, yet it is executed eight years later. Here, Pieter went to more explicit extremes. The boy has the same expression of mute horror, but look at the relationship between David and Uriah. David, clad in a blue-purple robe and red cape and bearing a golden scepter, is squirming uncomfortably on his throne, knowing that what he is about to do is utterly wrong. Uriah, kneeling before him, seems to suspect the truth, because his posture is one of being repelled, trying to increase the distance between the king and himself. A dog, the symbol of loyalty, separates between them.

In both paintings, the background behind Uriah depicts a holy building (modeled after of St. Peter's Basilica, rumored to contain pillars from the Temple in Jerusalem), suggesting God's presence on his side. In the earlier painting, the sky behind him portends danger. In the latter one, the crimps and folds in fabrics that seem to rustle in the foreground give an unsettling feeling.


Pieter Lastman, King David Handing the Letter to Uriah, 1611


Pieter Lastman, King David Handing the Letter to Uriah, 1619


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Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments In this excerpt I explore the moment of anticipation, before Bathsheba comes to David. He can still back down from going ahead with this forbidden affair, which is why I make frequent mention of the presence of the tent of God, the presence of his conscience. Is this a moment of pure love? Lust? Decadence? I explore all these possibilities...

To read more, click here: Love? Lust? Or decadence?




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Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments "And so, my trusty soldier fought his last battle. Perhaps, at the last second—as the arrow was singing in the air, coming closer and closer at him, like a lover eager for a kiss—his eyes started to widen.
Perhaps he knew that his death would not be caused by that arrow, but by the hand of a woman, the one he loved..."

To read more, click here: He died by the hand of a woman, the one he loved




message 9: by Uvi (new) - rated it 5 stars

Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments I don't know how Justin Harmer found my work. I consider myself lucky for it, because he placed an audition for it. Take a listen to an excerpt from the upcoming audiobook edition of A Peek at Bathsheba...

To read more, and listen to the narration, click here:
The voice behind A Peek at Bathsheba




message 10: by Uvi (new) - rated it 5 stars

Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments Justin Harmer will be playing David, and every one of his wives, advisors, and enemies, in the upcoming audiobook edition of A Peek at Bathsheba. Want to know why I chose him? How could I not, with this audition? Take a listen:

Playing David




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Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments John Tucker is a multi-genre author, who says about himself, "I embrace my Gemini ways with an abandon that generally belongs to serial killers, traveling evangelists, and the heroes of most Zombie movies." What a great surprise to find his review of A Peek at Bathsheba:

★★★★★ A Modern Take on an Old Bible Story, October 1, 2014
By J.D.Tucker "J.D. Tucker" (Monroe, Georgia)

Growing up in church I always heard the story of David and Bathsheba in a negative way. True, David loved her at first sight, but the dirty way he sent her husband into the front lines of battle in order to kill him soured my views of the Biblical Hero. From heroically slaying Goliath with a sling, to cowardly sending a man to his death in order to claim his wife. Uvi Poznansky managed to change my mind a bit with this modern take on David's obsession and pursuit of the woman of his dreams. It's definitely not a dry book. It brims with emotions like passion, jealousy, lust, triumph, and self-realization. Religious without being preachy, historic without being boring. Five Stars.

Get ★★★★★ A PEEK AT BATHSHEBA
♥ Ebook ♥ http://BookShow.me/B00LEPPDV6
♥ Print ♥ http://BookShow.me//0984993274
#historical #romance

A Peek at Bathsheba (The David Chronicles, #2) by Uvi Poznansky


message 12: by Uvi (new) - rated it 5 stars

Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments So exciting! Producing the audiobook edition of A Peek at Bathsheba is quickly coming to its completion! This is a sweet moment for me, and a sad one too, because I would miss working with my wonderful narrator, Justin Harmer, who has truly become David, and every one of his wives and enemies.

To read more click here:
This is a sweet moment for me and a sad one




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Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments Hope you had a great Halloween, everyone! Like to dress up in costumes, or to strike a funny pose? You've come to the right place!

Here is Bathsheba Bathing, a lovely oil painting painting by Paolo Veronese, showing king David approaching her with a proposition in mind... I invite you to step into the scene, and help the action along! Here's how:

Come join David and Bathsheba in the royal gardens




message 14: by Uvi (new) - rated it 5 stars

Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments My book, A Peek at Bathsheba (narrated by Justin Harmer) includes a sighting of Bathsheba at mouth of a cave, located just above the Kidron valley, near Jerusalem. I was inspired to paint the scene. My watercolor is homage to A Woman Bathing in a Stream, painted in 1655 by Rembrandt, immediately after he painted Bathsheba at Her Bath.

To read more click here:
Cover reveal for A Peek at Bathsheba (audiobook edition)




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Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments Perhaps it is the smell of blood, together with the sense of mystery, that bring to my mind the dangers lurking ahead—not just on this journey, and not just in my generation, but in generations to come. Somehow I foresee, right here and now, how our offspring will be lead, powerless, to the brink of extinction.
I shudder to see the calf, held with a knife to its throat, fall to its knees before the sacrifice. Sharply has its last bleat died down.
Then it is placed on the bronze altar, and carefully arranged into position between all the odd implements: the pails for removing ashes, and the shovels and basins and forks and fire pans and the utensils of bronze. In a flash, its body is completely consumed by fire. Nothing but ash remains.
This burnt offering is a vision of our future.
This calf is us.
I feel an overwhelming sadness, and to escape its grip I begin to dance. I dance because this is our moment, because the future is faraway and the dangers it holds are still obscure. With enough joy, enough energy in all of us, perhaps we can change its course.
Denial is bliss.
I give it everything I have. I dance with abandon. I dance with all my might.
As we come near the walls of the city I hear shouts, cheers, and the sound of trumpets, which spurs me to cry out, to sing. And as I am singing, the gates open before me.

David in A Peek at Bathsheba

To read more, see beautiful art, and listen to the narration click here:

Dancing with all his might




message 16: by Uvi (new) - rated it 5 stars

Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments I invite you to read this fascinating article, written by Justin Harmer, the gifted narrator of my novel A Peek at Bathsheba. Like my legendary character David, Justin is a prolific poet and musician (playing the harp, among other instruments.) If, like me, you are curious about the process of blowing life into story, by delving into your soul, deep inside, to find the truth at the heart of the characters, then check this out:

As to the bedroom scene with Bathsheba... Lord, forgive me the sins of my youth!




message 17: by Uvi (new) - rated it 5 stars

Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments My announcement of the day is this: Yay!!!!!!!
The audiobook edition of A Peek at Bathsheba, narrated by Justin Harmer, has just gone live!!!!

Take a listen, I promise you will love it:



message 18: by Uvi (new) - rated it 5 stars

Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments Wrapped in a long, flowing fabric that creates countless folds around her curves, she loosens just the top of it and lets it slide off her head—only to reveal a blush, and mischievous glint, shining in her eye. It is over that sparkle that I catch a sudden reflection, coming from the back window, of a full moon.
Looking left, right, and down the staircase, to make sure no one is lurking outside my chamber door, I let her in. Then I lock it behind her, so no one may intrude upon us.

To read more, and listen to the beautiful narration click here:




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Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments “I have no secrets from you,” I say, brazenly. “Perhaps I should have.”
He seethes at me. “Behind my back, you’ve been bold enough to entertain the worst of my enemies, the one who has the blood of my brother, Asahel, on his hands.”

To read more & listen to the beautiful narration by Justin Harmer, click here:
Behind my back, you’ve been bold enough to entertain the worst of my enemies




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Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments I try to comfort her, but she seems to be far away, locked in her own grief. I raise her to her feet and carry her—all the way up the long, circular staircase—into my chamber. Kissing her I taste the salt of her tears. I smell the sweet fragrance of her milk.
Then I make love to her--

I raise her to her feet and carry her—all the way up the staircase—into my chamber




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Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments I seal the scroll and give it to my dear, trusty soldier, knowing he would never suspect he is carrying his own death sentence in his hand.
And for a long time after the sound of his steps has died down I remain there, sitting at the edge of my throne, listening for him, hoping he would come back to me, wishing I could find a way to save him.

To read more, and listen to the beautiful narration by Justin Harmer​, click here:
He would never suspect he is carrying his own death sentence in hand




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Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments I find it amazing to be in the skin of the character from youth to old age. I hope you will too.

Check out the trailer:



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Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments She must have been eager, at first, to meet the notoriously dashing young hero, the slayer of Goliath, the idol drawn so perfectly out of legends that belong to a dying generation. Only now does she realize that I belong nowhere else but in her aging mother’s dreams--

To read more click here:
Unlike me, he never fought for what he has




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Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments Mary Ann Vitale is the author of lovely children's books. I am thrilled to find her review of my novel, A Peek at Bathsheba:

★★★★★ A masterpiece!, March 2, 2015
By M.A.
Verified Purchase
A Peek at Bathsheba is a great book that truly surprised me, I didn't know what to expect. It brings to life that particular Bible book of King David. The king goes through his turmoil, hopes, mistakes, passion, and love for Bathsheba. There are wars, blood shed, betrayals, and peace plans. He makes it clear what his role is as king. He has humor. I laughed at the remark made comparing a woman to a fruit. The book is written in a contemporary style, making us aware of the similar questions, mistakes, we share in our modern world. I love the author's poetic style!

Get ★★★★★ A PEEK AT BATHSHEBA:
kindle
nook
iTunes
kobo
smashwords
Print
Audio


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Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments I go on to ask, “So, if she were a regular wife, I mean, the wife of a regular soldier, and could offer no political gain—none whatsoever—would you start an affair with her?”
“No,” he says, firmly, and again he spits. “Never.”
“Not even if you were in love?”
“Love?” he echoes, as if this were some foreign, Babylonian word--

To read more click here:
The general takes a sniff of the wine




message 26: by Uvi (new) - rated it 5 stars

Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments I am thrilled to find a five-star review for my trilogy, The David Chronicles, written by top Amazon reviewer and author Sheila Deeth. In addition to her novel, Divide by Zero, she has written The Five Minute Bible Story Series, and other books. With a Masters in mathematics from Cambridge University, England, she is a a top reviewer for Amazon, Goodreads, Gather and other reading sites. This is what she says:

★★★★★ Biblical history, beautifully told, and set in a very real world
BySheila Deeth "Sheila Deeth" VINE VOICEon March 25, 2015
Format: Kindle Edition
The David Chronicles is a collection of three wonderful novels by Uvi Poznansky. Together they tell a tale of madmen and kings, love and betrayal, youth and old age, prison cells and freedom’s ring. Drawn from Biblical history, they vividly recreate character and place, inviting readers to see the world of King David as his contemporaries might have seen it, from the giant Goliath to the rebellious son, wounded daughter, and fickle wives.
The David of these novels is no saint, but rather a wise and careful man, brought down as he struggles to balance love and duty against nation and family. The world around him is dangerous, rife with plots and wars. And a wise king, singing songs, will do well to take care how history will see him.
I love this series for its convincing depiction of real people in ancient times, for its unflinching honesty, and for its vividly real characters. This David is no cardboard cutout to be filled in with bright crayoned colors. His Bathsheba is no plaything. And his women will take their place on the stage of history, will have their voice, and will cry out for love and hate and hope.
Echoing with phrases from the psalms, singing with a lonely king’s “hope for redemption... when prayers go unanswered,” and filled with real characters who have “learn[ed] their lessons—not from ... psalms, but from ... deeds,” this sequence of novels brings the Bible to life, takes readers deep into David’s mind, and leaves us knowing the characters of the past, or even of the Bible, weren’t so different from people today after all. It's highly recommended!

Get ★★★★★ THE DAVID CHRONICLES
#‎kindle http://BookShow.me/B00QYGF6WG
#‎nook http://tinyurl.com/nook-chrn
#‎iTunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/id96...
#‎kobo http://tinyurl.com/kobo-chrn
#‎smashwords http://tinyurl.com/smsh-chrn

The David Chronicles (boxed set) by Uvi Poznansky


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Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments As Uriah is summoned back to the court I ask myself, why is he so obstinate, so determined not to visit his wife? It is possible that a hint, a rumor of his her adultery has already reached his ears? If so, is there any course of action open to him?

To read more click here:
Haven’t you just come from a military campaign?




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Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments Seeing how exhausted I am Abishag takes the feather, ever so gently, from my fingers, careful not to touch the tip, and withdraws from me. Washing the ink off at the other end of the chamber, she bends over the windowsill, glancing at the lush trees swaying down there, in the royal gardens. Without words, she hums a little tune under her breath, and her voice is so sad, so melodious, that it tells me how desperately she misses her faraway village, from where she was taken to the palace.
She must have been eager, at first, to meet the notoriously dashing young hero, the slayer of Goliath, the idol drawn so perfectly out of legends that belong to a dying generation. Only now does she realize that I belong nowhere else but in her aging mother’s dreams.
I tell her, “Listen, daughter, and pay careful attention. Forget your people and your father’s house. Let the king be enthralled by your beauty. Honor him, for he is your lord.”
And at once I wonder, why do I take this fatherly tone with her, all of a sudden? And why do I speak of myself as if I were not here?
Abishag cannot help but yawn, which I happen to understand, because the lecture I have aimed at her bores me, too.
“So many young men, out there,” she whispers.
“So much noise,” I complain, over her excitement.
“If it’s disturbing to you, your majesty, I can go down,” she offers. “I can ask them to keep things more quiet, for you.”
“No,” say I. “Stay with me.”
“Are you cold? Shall I close the curtains?”
“No. Keep them open.”
Then, with slight hesitation, “Your son,” she says. “What does he want? Why did he come?”
“He loves me so,” I say, hoping she would not catch the irony in my voice. “Once in a long while he comes up here, to check if I’m still breathing.”
Abishag says nothing in reply. After a long pause she asks, “Did he invite you to the festivities? I would love to escort you—”
“Festivities?” say I. “No one tells me anything these days, which is why I am becoming so pitifully suspicious.”
“I see him down there,” she says. “His guests are arriving now, gathering around to greet him. They’re laughing. He’s not.”
At that I wave my hand. “Adoniah must be tired. He’s utterly weary of life here, in my palace. Luxury can be such a boring thing when you’re born into it.”
She glances back at me, her eyes wide with disbelief. “Is it, really?”
“It must be,” say I. “Unlike me, he’s never fought for what he has."

David in The David Chronicles

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The David Chronicles (boxed set) by Uvi Poznansky


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Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments “Tell us the truth,” she demands. “Are you having an affair?”
So what choice do I have but to swear, “In heaven’s name, what are you suggesting?”
“I’m not suggesting,” says she. “I’m just saying.”
“I would never betray my wives!”

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Mother's Day Gift: Dear, are you cheating on us?




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Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments She bares her breast and brings him in, tilting herself into his little mouth, but the baby is too sleepy, it seems, to suck her milk.
I get up, and walk away to the sound of her voice singing a melodious lullaby, at the end of which it trails off, ever so tenderly, into sadness.

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I watch the two of them, mother and child




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Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments What a great review by Joan Lane, the author of The Tangled Web: an international web of intrigue, murder and romance. I am thrilled to read what she wrote:

★★★★★ An enthralling spin on one of the Bible's most famous stories
By Joan P. Ashley "J.P. Lane" on May 7, 2015
Verified Purchase

This is the second book of the David Chronicles that I’ve read and I found it as enthralling as the first, which tells the story of David’s famous slaying of Goliath, his years as a fugitive and his rise to power. In A Peek at Bathsheba, the story continues with David’s coronation as King of Israel and his obsession with Bathsheba, the wife of one of his soldiers. This obsession leads to his passionate love affair with Bathsheba, the murder of her husband, and the beginning of the turmoil predicted by David’s scribe, the prophet Nathan.

I love the way Uvi Poznansky weaves history, fantasy and exquisite prose together to create an enthralling portrayal of these times. Her story of David is loaded with vivid imagery, and emotion. You’re there – in Israel, and inside David’s head as you read his every thought and feel his joy and pain. Ms. Poznansky hasn’t chosen to idealize David. He has his flaws, big ones. But perhaps this is why he is such a compelling character, the kind of character that doesn’t allow you to put a book down.

I loved A Peek at Bathsheba. It’s a brilliant piece of historical fiction.

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Forbidden love, political scandal
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A Peek at Bathsheba (The David Chronicles #2) by Uvi Poznansky


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Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments After so many years of marriage, with a husband as doting as Uriah, she is still without child. And with her reputation—about which she can do little, because she is, after all, a soldier’s wife—Bathsheba must have been with many men before me. Still, she is childless. How else can you explain this fact, but by assuming she is barren?

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Bathsheba, a soldier's wife




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Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments I go out to the roof and pace to and fro. Already, there is chill in the air. The rays of the setting sun give a last flicker before darkness, before a sensation of fear sets in. Then they withdraw, hesitating to touch the tabernacle of God down there, below me.
Coming back in I set the twin sconces, left and right of the chamber door, aflame. Which is when, to the quickening of my pulse, I see it opening.
There she is, lifting her little foot and setting it across the threshold.

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Love? Lust? Decadence?




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Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments The David Chronicles is the journey of a lifetime, from the hero's youth to his old age. The way I wrote it is greatly inspired by painting and sculpture throughout the history of art, depicting the story David, who is an exceptional historical figure with great gifts, facing great temptations in love and war--

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Begin the journey, see where it takes you




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Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments I want to wait, wait for her to give herself to me—but in the end I cannot fight my passion any longer, and I take her. She sighs softly and arches against me, rising on the fervor of my caress, higher and higher into ecstasy.

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David commits adultery




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Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments A long time ago I used to think that my youth was to blame for failing to understand my wives. No longer can I use that excuse, because I know all too well, there is no youth in me anymore. Which leaves me as baffled as ever, especially when it comes to the one woman I adore: Bathsheba--

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I held her in my arms that hot summer evening




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Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments Sapphire Reader, AKA Joan Roman Pavlick​I is a audio book lover turned Audio Book Reviewer. I am thrilled to find her review of my novel, A PEEK AT BATHSHEBA:

★★★★★ A Love Story that should not go Unheard!
BySapphire Reader
A Peek at Bathsheba, The David Chronicles, Book 2 by Uvi Poznansky. Performed by Justin Harmer. This nearly 7 hours audio book really took me by surprise.

Uvi's way of weaving a flow of words that brings to life the greatest love story that most may have missed in our lives. How we heard about David killing the Giant. Or how Bathsheba the most beautiful women of her time. This tale is of how even the best of us can fall into the sin of that forbidden love. With someone already married and by the law of God untouchable. I love the way the words unfurl themselves as they are spoken by David. His way of expressing himself thru his poetry and telling of his tales of the past.

Knowing that he is only a man. Yet an anointed King of Israel, he must keep up all appearances. David speaks about his love for his wives. How they bring out the best and sometimes the worst of him. Telling of how each one of them became his bride and the challenges he met to win them over and sometimes not even then. For each one of the wives holding their place in his heart and succession of heirs they bear. Then, one day looking from his balcony he sees her, Bathsheba. The most beautiful woman he has ever seen. However, this adoration that must be seen from afar has now consumed him. He must have her. Yet, this was the wife of one of his soldiers. The passionate affair with her now has David now sending her husband in the way of harms way in battle. His way of covering this scandal.

Uvi choice of words has David speaking in such a way that you can feel the passion in her words. The words as they are spoken by Justin Harmer. Soft spoken yet with enough forcefulness to hold you captive for that moment in time. I enjoyed the way the story unfurled itself piece by piece. A huge puzzle gently put together and over time, you feel the pain that Bathsheba has at the loss of their son. How David deals with that death. How he feels that this is God's way of punishing them for their indiscretion. How Justin over the course of the book the change in his voice as it grows older and weary over time.

This story has been beautifully written. It has been narrated/performed to perfection giving that passive tone needed for such a tale.

This book was provided to me by the author for an honest review. However, at the time I did not have the first part of the David Chronicles. So I purchased that book so I can give a review of part one of this extraordinary story. All views above are solely mine and no way effected by others or their comments. Please take the time to let me know if this review was helpful or not. Always cherish comments as well.

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A Peek at Bathsheba (The David Chronicles #2) by Uvi Poznansky


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Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments Jess Steven Hughes​ has extensive experience as a police detective sergeant. He is also a horseman, and he draws on all his skills in writing his great historical fiction books. I am thrilled to find his review of my novel, A Peek at Bathsheba:

★★★★★ David and Bathsheba - The Bible Brought to Life, August 2, 2015

From the cobwebs of the Old Testament, author Uvi Poznansky masterful prose has brought to life the legendary and forbidden romance of King David to the beautiful but married, Bathsheba.

To place in a historical perspective, it must be remembered that King David and Bathsheba were products of their time. Uvi Poznansky makes this abundantly clear. In the ancient world of the Near East, most so-called kings were little more than clan chieftains, ruling small pieces of territory. David, who was egocentric, had proven himself on the battlefield, but was still doubtful of his own strength. He was one of these petty monarchs, ruling over only one of the twelve tribes of Israel. His capital was the small mud and brick city of Hebron. Knowing that to truly be considered a "real king" and recognized as an equal by the leadership of Egypt, Assyria and the Hittites, he had to unite the twelve tribes under his reign.

Along the way, David had to deal with betrayal and treachery from within, including his commanding general, Joav. He was a soldier only interested in perpetual war and had no interest in seeing the tribes Israel united.

David also had to deal with the wiles and needs of his many wives. Perhaps it was this that drew him to Bathsheba, a married woman and therefore "forbidden fruit."

We know Bathsheba was the wife of the soldier, Uriah, a Hittite. Being a foreigner, he was probably a mercenary in David's service, albeit a loyal one.

The wives of soldiers in the ancient armies were mostly camp followers and passed around from one fighter to the next. The author points out that David was aware of this, knowing that Bathsheba had experienced the same until her union with Uriah had been legitimized. He also knew Bathsheba, as a married woman, would be stoned to death for adultery if their affair was discovered.

Given Bathsheba was "only a woman" and that David was king and considered "above the law," it is doubtful that Bathsheba would have refused his advances. Perhaps she was resigned to that fact. At the same time, the author makes it clear she was a clever, intelligent and strong minded woman. She probably considered her affair with David as an opportunity to advance herself by having his son. She certainly succeeded, as her son, Solomon, became one of the most famous kings in The Old Testament.

All of this is weaved together by the author's almost poetic style. She brings her characters to life describing their strengths and foibles to the point you can easily identify with any of them. It is a story of deep love and one of intrigue
.
Some readers will probably be put off by author's modern usage of words which do not necessarily give it a "biblical" feel. However, I believe more will identify with it than using archaic words which have no relevance into today's modern society.

For the bible purists, they might take offense, believing this style sacrilegious or even sinful.

I like her style. Five stars.

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A Peek at Bathsheba (The David Chronicles #2) by Uvi Poznansky


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Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments Lovely new review for my novel, A Peek at Bathsheba:

★★★★★ Modern Take on a Biblical Story, August 4, 2015
By Loves To Read

I'm a fan of historical fiction and have a soft spot for biblical fiction. In this second book of Poznansky's series about David, I was drawn to to beautiful imagery and characterization of historical figures I know so well from the Bible. What stuck me most about "Bathsheba" was the humanity of those characters and how under Poznansky's care, David became "real" for me. The author's unique perspective on time period drew me in, making me believe she had first hand knowledge of the conversations between David and Bathsheba which felt both biblical and contemporary at the same time. What made the book so enjoyable was that I connected to David as a person, a human with mortal faults and weaknesses, just like me. He questioned himself and his loyalty to God, all the while struggling with the power of sin. Outside of the Bible, within in the context of this series, David (and Bathsheba) are still both holy and worthy of reverence, but are also people in need of our empathy and understanding. Bravo. Highly recommend to historical fiction lovers, especially those who enjoy novels like The Red Tent by Anita Diamant.

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A Peek at Bathsheba (The David Chronicles #2) by Uvi Poznansky The Red Tent by Anita Diamant


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Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments For a whole month, fearing that a scandal may erupt, I avoid sending for her. It is the beginning of summer, and the heat is unusual, unrelenting—but I avoid going out onto the roof, which is where a light breeze can offer some relief, because it is there, more than any other place, that I ache for her. I whisper her name, and burn up at the mere sound of it--

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For a whole month, fearing that a scandal may erupt, I avoid sending for her




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Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments Ashley Fontainne​ is an avid reader of classic literature and she is the author of Zero Balance, Accountable to None, Ramblings of a Mad Southern Woman, and more. So I am honored that she has just posted a review of my novel on Amazon. This is what she says about my mover, A Peek at Bathsheba:

★★★★★ Beautifully crafted!, October 5, 2015
By Ashley Fontainne
This review is from: A Peek at Bathsheba (The David Chronicles Book 2) (Kindle Edition)
Uvi Poznansky’s body of works with any art form she uses is magical. In this story, the second in the David Chronicles, Uvi applies her extensive knowledge of ancient Biblical times to craft a lyrical, rhythmic piece that could easily have been written from a real-time perspective during the days of David and Bathsheba.

The fluid and imaginative words in the pages immerse the reader inside the hearts and minds of not only the characters of the Old Testament but also the daily lives of others during the time period. Complex and colorful, Uvi expertly guides the reader back to a time long since passed, yet delicately weaves the age-old struggles of life, children, marriage, aging and relationship issues we all experience today. Reading this book was like grabbing a companion guide to The Psalms! The banter between the main characters was enjoyable, the descriptions beautiful and realistic.

*I was provided a free copy of this novel in exchange for an honest review.”

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A Peek at Bathsheba (The David Chronicles #2) by Uvi Poznansky


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Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments The door will swing and open wide
Take off your coat and come inside
No more trembling, no more chill
Here is my paper and my quill--

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Kisses, hugs, and lavish giving




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Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments Through the decorative lattice that marks the edge of my roof I see a woman, an achingly beautiful woman bathing on a close-by roof. She has just wrapped herself with something translucent, so her body is hidden from sight—all but a distant impression of her foot.

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One evening I awaken to the sound of birds, chirping




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Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments My author friends have joined forces with me! We bring you amazing stories, narrated by great voice actors just in time for Mother's Day. Please join us for a chance to win audiobooks:

Happy Mother’s Day




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Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments And as it spreads its feathers I think I see out there, behind the flutter, a curvaceous outline of a nude. I ache to touch her flesh. It is glowing with warm, reddish hues of terra-cotta. Her breasts are tipped with gold--

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Her breasts are tipped with gold




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Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments In my exhaustion I can barely move my lips, yet I know she will read me. “What’s his name?”
“Solomon.”
“Yes,” I say, telling myself how fortunate it is for him, and how timely, to be named for peace. “Solomon.”
There is a time to kill and a time to heal, a time to tear down and a time to build. How fortunate it is for me to find myself back here. I am a father. I am the keeper of my family, and the shepherd of my people. What a moment this is, the perfect moment to usher in a new era.

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Enjoy Father's Day together: read A Peak at Bathsheba




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Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments “Come here,” I whisper to her.
Instead she goes to the window. I find myself unable to say anything, so instead I make a note to myself, to write down these words, later: “The fragrance of your garments is like the fragrance of Lebanon. You are a garden locked up, my sister, my bride. You are a spring enclosed, a sealed fountain.”

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You are a spring enclosed, a sealed fountain




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Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments With this woman presenting herself to my imagination in such an alluring way, I began worrying that I would surely go down in history as a sinner. Truly I wished to stay honest with the public—but knew I would find it difficult to do so. Being absolutely frank about the naughty thoughts in my head would surely prevent me from looking good in their eyes.

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A rosy sunset light played upon her neck, her ears, her cheeks




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Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments First Bathsheba throws open the window, letting in a cold morning breeze. As if to tell me that this is already autumn, a smell of dry leaves wafts in. The silk curtains start swishing as they sway, they billow wildly around her, blotting and redrawing the curves of her silhouette, which in a blink, brings back to me the fullness of her figure back then, when she was expecting our first child--

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I remember the way I held her n my arms




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Uvi Poznansky | 715 comments When Uriah comes before me he seems unusually tense. His jaw is set, his face—pale.
At first I figure that the long journey to the city of Rabbah and back here again must have drained him. I try to ignore the pain I detect in his eyes. I mean, it must be my mistake, I am seeing things. And whether I like it or not, for his wife’s sake I must push him into a trap--

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I send my body guard after him, with a gift




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