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F2F Book Discussions > F2F73: January 2018 | Young Adult

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message 1: by Angus (last edited Jan 15, 2018 07:58PM) (new)

Angus (angusmiranda) | 4337 comments Hieee! Happy New Year! I hope you had a good time during the recent holiday celebrations. Anyway, January 2018 marks the first month that we'll be shifting our F2F gears. Instead of picking a particular book for the month, we'll instead explore different books under a theme assigned for the month.

Our theme for the month is ... tada! Young adult! We'd like to ask you to pick any book (or books!) categorized as young adult. Let's talk about those books here. We'll be posting questions that will help guide the conversations on this thread. You may also ask questions if you're inclined to do so.

If you're considering attending the F2F book discussion by the end of the month, please be prepared to talk about the book that you've selected for this month. I don't know about you, but I'm looking forward to this.

---

F2F73 Book Discussion Details
Date: January 27, Saturday
Place: Mister Kabab, Second Floor, Pearl Plaza, Pearl Drive, Ortigas, Pasig City
Time: 2 PM
RSVP here

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Week 1 Questions:
1. What book are you reading for this month? Why?
2. What are your feelings regarding young adult? Love it or hate it?
3. Give us 3-5 young adult books that you love. If none, why do you think you haven't found a young adult book that you love?


message 2: by Mabelle (last edited Jan 02, 2018 09:19AM) (new)

Mabelle Ortega | 139 comments Happy New Year everyone!

I am going to start reading the Clockwork Princess, the 3rd book of Cassandra Clare's Infernal Devices, because it is the conclusion to the story. :) I want to know how the author ended the story... (I couldn't think of another reason as of the moment... hahaha)

I love reading it because it makes me feel young (hahaha... but I'm not that old... hahaha). And, the ideas of the young adult theme are so wide it is fascinating to read...

I love all Cassandra Clare's books and her Shadowhunter world.
I also love Harry Potter, and the Hunger Games.


message 3: by Monique (new)

Monique (attymonique) | 2126 comments Happy 2018, lovely TFG folks! Let's get the F2F ball rolling :)

Week 1 Questions:
1. I'm planning to read (hopefully, since they're short) two books: We Were Liars and Tiger Lily.

2. They're OK. There are really good YA books out there but there are some that can also break my cringe-o-meter.

3. Off the top of my head: I loved
Wonder, Stargirl, and Why We Broke Up. I loved "Wonder" because of August and his indomitable spirit, "Stargirl" because of her sincerity, and "Why We Broke Up" because of its honesty and beautiful illustrations.


message 4: by Angus (last edited Jan 03, 2018 06:02AM) (new)

Angus (angusmiranda) | 4337 comments Week 1 Questions:
1. I'm planning to read Someday This Pain Will Be Useful to You because the title is pretty. I've borrowed my copy from Kristel but she ended up giving the book to me (thanks!).

2. I used to not get adults reading young adult but I've made my peace with that. However, I still take some issue on adults reading exclusively young adult books.

3. The first young adult books that come to mind are The Book Thief, Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe, and Harry Potter 3. I love The Book Thief because it's historical fiction for young adults, which I think is a good book to get youthful readers to understand a bit of history. I love Aristotle because he's so gay lol. I love Harry Potter 3 because it's the best in the series (and so is the film adaptation). But this is coming from someone who only got to book 5.


message 5: by Louize (new)

Louize (thepagewalker) | 1830 comments Happy 2018!

Week 1 Questions:
1. I am planning to read The True Adventures of Nicolo Zen, be-cause I have a copy ready(?).
2. I must say that I had some very good ones.
3. Some of the YA books I love were already mentioned here, but I need to add Paper Towns, The Universe Versus Alex Woods, and The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian.

I admire Margo from Paper Towns, she's a force of nature, uninhibited. Alex Woods, more or less, is of the same peel and very loyal. Meanwhile, Junior, from Sherman Alexie's book, is a model of resilience.

reply | flag *


message 6: by Lynai (last edited Jan 03, 2018 12:34AM) (new)

Lynai | 1188 comments Happy 2018, TFG!

Week 1 Questions:
1. What book are you reading for this month? Why?
- I'm still choosing between You in Five Acts and Wonder. I might read both books if I have enough time. I already have copies of both books and I'd like to make a dent on my TBR shelf. :)

2. What are your feelings regarding young adult? Love it or hate it?
- My intro to reading fiction was through thriller genre types and I only got to appreciate reading young adult books when I was in my late 20s, when I first read and got hooked to The Hunger Games and The Chaos Walking Trilogy. My reading mood varies and there are times I want to read young adult books. There have been YA books I really loved but too much teenage angst sometimes would tire me.

3. Give us 3-5 young adult books that you love. If none, why do you think you haven't found a young adult book that you love?

- As mentioned, I loved The Hunger Games, The Chaos Walking Trilogy, Navigating Early, and there's this latest YA book I enjoyed: Clockwise.


message 7: by Gay (new)

Gay | 58 comments Happy New Year, everyone!
Week 1 Questions:
1. What book are you reading for this month? Why?
>For this month, I'm planning to continue reading Si Janus Silang at ang Labanang Manananggal-Mambabarang. I started this last September but ended up putting it back in my shelf because I had to focus on other things first (hehe). I think it's time that I finish this so that I could move on to the third book since I think Edgar Samar is now working on the fourth book. :)

2. What are your feelings regarding young adult? Love it or hate it?
>I love reading YA. I enjoy reading it because of the #feels it brings me. Aside from that, it makes me feel connected to the characters especially when I associate one of my students with them. Sometimes, the YA books that I have read help me to deal with my students too. However, sometimes I get tired of reading YA because there's too much drama that I don't understand and I cannot connect with the characters anymore.

3. Give us 3-5 young adult books that you love. If none, why do you think you haven't found a young adult book that you love?
>I loved Jenny Han's To All The Boys I've Loved Before series, Rick Riordan's Heroes of Olympus series, Stephanie Perkins' Anna, Lola, Isla trilogy, Maggie Stiefvater's Dream Thieves and The Raven King, and of course, J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter series.


message 8: by Alexa (last edited Jan 03, 2018 08:45AM) (new)

Alexa (codenameblue) | 935 comments HI GUYS I missed you all huhu Happy New Year!!!

Week 1 Questions:
1. What book are you reading for this month? Why?
I'm reading Lost Stars by Claudia Gray for this month because I wanted to get into the new Star Wars canon, and I heard that this was epic!

2. What are your feelings regarding young adult? Love it or hate it?

Depends on the book! It's really hit or miss. Sometimes I find one that I end up dropping after a few chapters because of the writing, or I just find it too predictable, but once in a while I get to read a young adult book that just pierces through to my numb soul, chz. It's because of those memorable books that I love going back to this genre time and again. I don't think anyone's too old, really, for young adult. There are always new books that reinvent the genre and it never dulls for me :)

3. Give us 3-5 young adult books that you love. If none, why do you think you haven't found a young adult book that you love?

There are so many!! Apart from the ones already mentioned here, Flat-Out Love by Jessica Park. It's so underrated imho! Apart from people here in TFG, I don't know anybody else who's even heard of it :(

I also really loved Jenny Han's To All the Boys I've Loved Before series!!! I really related to the main character, and I really liked how well her family life was also portrayed, including her relationship with her father and sisters. Family life is not often explored by most of the YA that I read, and this one was written with just the right amount. (This is also what I liked with the book prior to this one)

I also love Morgan Matson's books - they're mostly road trip-type books with playlists of actual songs that I really enjoy listening to - but my favorite is still her debut, which also happens to be the first of hers that I read, Amy & Roger's Epic Detour.

Does Flipped count? Oh, and definitely Eleanor & Park! <3 <3


message 9: by Tin (last edited Jan 14, 2018 02:12AM) (new)

Tin (rabbitin) | 560 comments Week 1 Questions:

1. I am planning to read The Fault in Our Stars because it is so underrated. I kid. It’s because this has gotten generally positive reviews from TFG. I actually started a few pages back in December last year but I set it aside for movies and for a chapter of The Bone Clocks. So yeah, YA month will give me the motivation to jump back into TFIOS.

2. The bulk of my readings used to be YA (and kidlit). But now that my reading has gotten more diverse, and my attitude has gotten more curmudgeonly, I have the tendency to be more nit picky with some of the YA books out there. BUT it is generally a “love it” for me. Last year, Ready Player One and Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock and Wonder is among my fave reads.

3. Without repeating any of your lovely answers:

The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman (and the rest of the His Dark Materials Trilogy) – Because it is a great adventure story and an intellectually stimulating piece of fiction too.

The 10 PM Question by Kate Di Goldi - a beautifully written book on mental illness that isn’t heavy handed in it’s portrayal. It is a bit quirky but in a fun and non-overbearing way.

Bud, not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis – Bud is a memorable character who is so positive, but not in an annoying way. The story too is moving and full of warmth.

Dr. Bird's Advice For Sad Poets by Evan Roskos - because it is uplifting and funny and provides what I think is an honest depiction of depression and anxiety

Nimona by Noelle Stevenson - what I initially perceived as a ha-ha funny kind of story ended up being quite emotionally stirring. One of my most surprising reads ever.


message 10: by KaZaam (last edited Jan 05, 2018 05:57AM) (new)

KaZaam | 151 comments Week 1 Questions:

1. What book are you reading for this month? Why?

Cold Burn of Magic (Black Blade, #1) by Jennifer Estep by Jennifer Estep It's YA and also fits another reading challenge, and it's been on my TBR for a long time.

2. What are your feelings regarding young adult? Love it or hate it?

I love YA Fantasy, YA Dystopian but I hate YA Romance. I just hate the "I'm gonna kill myself" and end of the world" scenarios in YA romance.

3. Give us 3-5 young adult books that you love. If none, why do you think you haven't found a young adult book that you love?
Only 5? So much to choose from so I will not repeat what others have chosen...
1. The Lumatere Chronicles (Lumatere Chronicles, #1-3) by Melina Marchetta Finnikin of the Rock (Lumatere Chronicles, #1) by Melina Marchetta Froi of the Exiles (Lumatere Chronicles, #2) by Melina Marchetta Quintana of Charyn (Lumatere Chronicles, #3) by Melina Marchetta
2. The Thief (The Queen's Thief, #1) by Megan Whalen Turner The Queen of Attolia (The Queen's Thief, #2) by Megan Whalen Turner The King of Attolia (The Queen's Thief, #3) by Megan Whalen Turner A Conspiracy of Kings (The Queen's Thief, #4) by Megan Whalen Turner
3. Eon Dragoneye Reborn (Eon, #1) by Alison Goodman Eona The Last Dragoneye (Eon, #2) by Alison Goodman
4. Unwind (Unwind, #1) by Neal Shusterman UnWholly (Unwind, #2) by Neal Shusterman UnSouled (Unwind, #3) by Neal Shusterman UnDivided (Unwind, #4) by Neal Shusterman
5. Throne of Glass (Throne of Glass, #1) by Sarah J. Maas Crown of Midnight (Throne of Glass, #2) by Sarah J. Maas Heir of Fire (Throne of Glass, #3) by Sarah J. Maas Queen of Shadows (Throne of Glass, #4) by Sarah J. Maas Empire of Storms (Throne of Glass, #5) by Sarah J. Maas
6. Legend (Legend, #1) by Marie Lu Prodigy (Legend, #2) by Marie Lu Champion (Legend, #3) by Marie Lu


message 11: by Abdul (new)

Abdul (juramentado) | 55 comments Haiii! Sorry for disappearing on you!

Week 1 Questions:
1. I'm planning on reading Patrick Ness' More Than This. Patrick Ness is one of my favorite authors and I just never really got around to reading this, so I'm taking this opportunity to open my copy. I also plan to read Kate Brian's Megan Meade's Guide to the McGowan Boys because it comes highly recommended by my college bffs, and her Private series and Privilege series were once my trashy YA jam.

2. I think it has its place. If for nothing else, it motivates a lot of young adults to find value in reading. But it does feel like the YA market has become a swamp of hashtag hype where the next bright, shiny thing buries the last bright, shiny thing, especially in Booktube.

3. Christopher Pike's Spooksville #19 Night of the Vampire, Brian McGreevy's Hemlock Grove, Pete Hautman's Godless, Elaine Marie Alphin's Simon Says, and Brian Malloy's The Year of Ice.

Spooksville is the series that turned me into a bookworm, and Night of the Vampire is the book that led me to Spooksville. It was so thrilling just to read the protagonists survive something difficult and impossible in the last four pages.

I like Hemlock Grove because it takes the dreamy fanged teenaged love interests and portrays them as actual teenagers who can be disgusting when they want to be. I liked McGreevy's style of writing here. (I particularly like the scene where one of the protagonists is heartbroken when he witnesses a couple having sex (view spoiler), and you don't know exactly if he's pining for one or the other or both, and it plays with the reader's unease about which possibility should disturb them. The Netflix adaptation didn't do the book justice.)

Godless helped me come a bit into terms with my family's religion. Simon Says is fiercely into following the beat of your drum, which was very helpful in college. Some of it was cheese and angst, but it tasted okay for me. The Year of Ice is about an angsty teenager who's in the closet and is very resentful of his dad. It was heartening to find my resentment on a page so I didn't have to say it out loud.

While I'm still here, I'd like to recommend Kevin Brooks' Lucas and Martin Wilson's What They Always Tell Us.


message 12: by Abdul (new)

Abdul (juramentado) | 55 comments Angus wrote: "Week 1 Questions:
1. I'm planning to read Someday This Pain Will Be Useful to You because the title is pretty. I've borrowed my copy from Kristel but she ended up giving the book to m..."


I loved Someday...! I went through a similar thing that James went through in the Washington seminar.


message 13: by Abdul (new)

Abdul (juramentado) | 55 comments Lynai wrote: "...when I first read and got hooked to The Hunger Games and The Chaos Walking Trilogy."

Manchee!!! That dog killed me.


message 14: by Bennard (new)

Bennard | 730 comments Happy 2018, you lovely lovely folks!

Week 1 Questions:
1. What book are you reading for this month? Why?
This month, I'm reading Jason Reynolds' Long Way Down. It's a story of a teenage boy whose brother was killed in a shooting and now he wants to get revenge. The entire thing is told over the course of a single elevator ride in verse which is what really piqued my interest.

2. What are your feelings regarding young adult? Love it or hate it?

I support it in principle as it does get a lot of young people reading. However, I've found out that the community itself is toxic and, based on my limited knowledge of the genre, most of it seems to be unimaginative and derivative.

3. Give us 3-5 young adult books that you love. If none, why do you think you haven't found a young adult book that you love?

I can only think of Paper Towns by John Green and The Harry Potter Saga by JK Rowling. Maybe Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird and Sophie's World by Jostein Gaarder if I can expand on the definition.


message 15: by Angus (new)

Angus (angusmiranda) | 4337 comments Hello, hello, hello! Thanks for all the recommendations. You are welcome to keep them coming.

Week 2 Questions:
1. What is YA for you? How does it differ from other genres of literature? Did it in any way affect your life (or just plainly your reading life)?
2. What are the themes that you enjoy reading about in YA books? Does your book of choice cover any of these themes?
3. Let's talk about characters. Who do you think is that single YA book character that is the most memorable? Tell us why in unforgettable terms.
4. Bonus: Do you have any venue suggestions for the F2F? :D


message 16: by Angus (new)

Angus (angusmiranda) | 4337 comments Abdul wrote: "I loved Someday...! I went through a similar thing that James went through in the Washington seminar. "

I'm on that part! I'm looking forward to finishing this. Based on friends' reviews, it's so divisive. I wonder which side of the fence will I be on.


message 17: by Meliza (last edited Jan 09, 2018 03:08AM) (new)

Meliza (mecawish) | 720 comments Week 1 Questions:
1. I'm going to read John Green's Turtles All the Way Down because I was recently given a copy by my brother.

2. Depends on the book, just like other genres. Maybe generally "love it", because they're easy to read, and somewhat relatable.

3. Ready Player One
Flipped
Ender's Game
Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
The Book Thief

Monique: I also love Tiger Lily. I wanted to read We Were Liars too but it was included in the burnt pile. Sob.

Angus: HP Book 3 is also my favorite HP book and movie!

Mommy Louize: I also enjoyed reading The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian. A 5-star read.

Abdul: I remember I once had and read a Spooksville book. Also a gift from my brother when we're still young. Haha. And I love it. It was about time travel and Watch making a sacrifice in the end. (wait, will google the title) Yup, Time Terror! I tried looking for other books in the series, but I was unlucky.


message 18: by Rollie (last edited Jan 09, 2018 08:10AM) (new)

Rollie (zheick) | 2098 comments Week 1 Questions
1. Undecided if Nevernight or Six of Crows.

2. I find YA just fine. I haven't been reading YA a lot lately. There are countless releases of YA every year and it's really hard to catch a good one and unique. However, I used to read YA and there are several books I love. Now, I just depend on recos.

3. Blood Red Road
Harry Potter Series.
Hunger Games
The Knife of Never Letting Go

Meliza: Hi! I've read somewhere before that Ender's Game isn't intended for YA readers. The author himself doesn't consider it as one. Haha!


message 19: by Monique (new)

Monique (attymonique) | 2126 comments Week 2 Questions

1. YA is literature written with a specific audience in mind, i.e., the young(er) readers. From my own experience, it differs from other genres in terms of readability. Subject matter, not really. YA can tackle the whole gamut of topics, but it differs from other genres because they're tailored for the younger minds. Hmm, reading YA provides a cleanser for the reading palate when I feel I could use some "light" or easy reading.

2. I specifically like the YA books that tackle realistic themes, like bullying and how to deal with bullies, rape (and its derivatives), and coming-of-age. Going through my YA reads confirms these choices.
As for my two book choices for the month, "TIger Lily" is a retelling but some of the magic of Neverland is stripped away to accommodate more "reality" while "We Were Liars" is *~all reality (I've yet to really classify what topic it deals with) so yes, my preferred themes cover these books.

3. It's a tie between Stargirl and Auggie of "Wonder." They're both different from the other kids in their own ways and it's because of these differences that they were shunned, ridiculed, and bullied. But their indomitable spirit, authenticity, and sincerity made them rise above it all. They're admirable.

4. Bonus: Do you have any venue suggestions for the F2F? :D
Since this is a YA discussion and (if I can help it) I'd like the venue to go with the month's theme, I'd suggest The Nook Cafe in Maginhawa because it's Harry Potter-themed!


message 20: by KaZaam (new)

KaZaam | 151 comments Week 2 Questions:

1. What is YA for you? How does it differ from other genres of literature? Did it in any way affect your life (or just plainly your reading life)?
(view spoiler)

2. What are the themes that you enjoy reading about in YA books? Does your book of choice cover any of these themes?
(view spoiler)

3. Let's talk about characters. Who do you think is that single YA book character that is the most memorable? Tell us why in unforgettable terms.
(view spoiler)

4. Bonus: Do you have any venue suggestions for the F2F? (view spoiler)
:D


message 21: by Aaron Vincent (new)

Aaron Vincent (aaronvincent) | 2053 comments Week 1 Questions

1. What book are you reading for this month? Why?
I am going to read Un Lun Dun by China Mieville. I've been meaning to read more from him and reading his first venture to the Young Adult genre seems like a good idea.

2. What are your feelings regarding young adult? Love it or hate it?
I used to read a lot from this genre. Most young adult books I read were fun and easy to read. However, I've grown tired of the tropes used all the time. The latest releases are mostly derivative and it has now become difficult to find a gem in between them.

3. Give us 3-5 young adult books that you love. If none, why do you think you haven't found a young adult book to love?
Paper Towns, On The Jellicoe Road, Unwind, The Knife of Never Letting Go and The Monstrumologist.


message 22: by Meliza (new)

Meliza (mecawish) | 720 comments Rollie: Maybe Ender's Game was never intended by Card as a YA novel, but it has been popular with that age group. It's tagged as YA here in Goodreads, anyway. I categorize it as Sci-Fi YA. :P


message 23: by Rhena (new)

Rhena | 97 comments Week 1 Questions:

1. I've chosen Stargirl by Jerry Spinelli because we already have a copy here at home (mostly because I am a cheapskate). I'm intrigued by it too because, while the majority of my bookish friends gave it stellar reviews, Bennard gave it a 1-star rating. I'm out to know why. Lol.

2. I feel about average regarding the young adult genre. I think I got turned off somewhat by template characters. But I gotta say that I've read brilliantly written ones too.

3. Such as Harry Potter, Flipped, and The Book Thief.


message 24: by Rhena (new)

Rhena | 97 comments Week 2 Questions:

1. I have a pretty vague idea about the boundaries of what's YA or not. I consider books YA when their protagonist is a young adult tackling issues and concerns of his/her age. I tend to call them coming-of-age stories, too. I usually pick up YA books when I'm in a reading slump.

2. What I like about YA are the stories of friendship, of blossoming of a first love, and of moments when they show wisdom, innocence, and sincerity. I'm happy to report that, so far, Stargirl has these themes.

3. I'd say Julianna Baker of Flipped. She is an old soul who doesn't get caught up in trivial matters like peer pressure and societal norms because ain't nobody got time for that. But when it affected her loved ones, she can be headstrong in showing these people. I like her because she is more than a sum of her parts.

4. Hmmm, maybe Books and Borders Cafe in Tomas Morato or Taco Vengo in Kapitolyo. Because they are the kinds of restaurants frequented by young adults? Haha. Not sure; haven't tried either one.


message 25: by Bennard (last edited Jan 10, 2018 06:26PM) (new)

Bennard | 730 comments Week 2 Questions:
1. I consider a book YA when the protagonist of the book is a teenager or, as the genre suggests, a young adult. So I would consider The Catcher in the Rye, To Kill A Mockingbird, and The Lord of the Flies YA. It hasn't affected my life that much except when YA books (The Chronicles of Narnia, The Harry Potter Saga) got me into reading which is to say that YA has helped me a great deal.

2. I love of coming-of-age narratives not just in books but also in movies. Of young people removing the veneer of young life and coming out of the other end of the story becoming a more fully-realized person and realizing that life is more complex than they could ever imagine. From what I've read so far, Long Way Down has what I am looking for.

3. Okay, don't shit on me for this but the most memorable YA character for me is Stargirl and for all the wrong reasons. I know a lot of you like the book but I just think her character is just a distillation of many of the things that I find wrong with YA as a genre.

4. Please visit me.


message 26: by Louize (new)

Louize (thepagewalker) | 1830 comments Week 2 Questions:
1. I mentioned before that reading makes me feel young at heart, and maybe, it is mostly because of reading YA books. They help me deal with the younger people better -I guess having that broader understanding of how the younger generations act and react today. And, aside from many other things, my daughter and I have great bonding moments together with books. I remember her literally shoving Stargirl and Love, Stargirl into my hands, urging me to read it pronto. It's like a call to be understood, at least on some level.

2. Definitely coming-of-age themed. It felt more rewarding reading a character/s who progressed by the end of the book.

What I am tired of, btw, are the love triangle themed that seems to have mushroomed on every new YA series nowadays.

3. Harry Potter. This century will have no other, I believe. How could anyone deny that tingling excitement we felt when Hagrid said, "Harry -- yer a wizard."?


Aaron, Un Lun Dun is very difficult to unlove.

Bennard, My daughter told me before that I should read Stargirl and Love, Stargirl in succession, no gap. She said that I will not appreciate the previous without reading the latter. And, of course, she's right. But I guess it's too late for you now, you already have a concrete opinion on it.


message 27: by Rollie (last edited Jan 11, 2018 06:47AM) (new)

Rollie (zheick) | 2098 comments Week 2 Questions:
1. What is YA for you? How does it differ from other genres of literature? Did it in any way affect your life (or just plainly your reading life)?

For me, YA is a classification that has a particular target age range, same as Middle Grade, Adult and others. The point of view of YA is usually told from a teenage voice.
I believe YA is one of the foundations of my reading life. So, it is because of YA I still read fiction now.

2. What are the themes that you enjoy reading about in YA books? Does your book of choice cover any of these themes?

Perhaps a school rivalry theme. Others may hate Gary Stu/Mary Sue characters but I often love them. Gee, I still can't move on with Ender's Shadow.

3. Let's talk about characters. Who do you think is that single YA book character that is the most memorable? Tell us why in unforgettable terms.

Bean from Ender's Shadow. He is a genius, a result of genetic engineering. At the age of one he was able to escape death. He has this instinct too that warns him whenever something bad is going to happen. He is my first favorite character.

4. Bonus: Do you have any venue suggestions for the F2F?
Nah.


Meliza: I was just kidding but the rest of the series are not. :D


message 28: by Gay (new)

Gay | 58 comments 1. What is YA for you? How does it differ from other genres of literature? Did it in any way affect your life (or just plainly your reading life)?
>YA is something that I truly enjoy reading because of how it presents a story from a young character’s perspective especially the well-written ones. It gets me excited to read through the next pages. However, as I look back on the books that affected my life, YA did not have that much of an impact except from wishing I were as badass as some of the YA characters when I was younger. Hahaha

2. What are the themes that you enjoy reading about in YA books? Does your book of choice cover any of these themes?
I like adventure filled YA books but with a tinge of romance like The Raven Cycle. I also enjoy fantasy and about growing up.

3. Let's talk about characters. Who do you think is that single YA book character that is the most memorable? Tell us why in unforgettable terms.
I can only think of Percy Jackson right now. He is unforgettable for me because of his humor and sarcasm even in the most troubling times. Plus, of all the monsters he fought and of all the not so good encounters with the Olympian gods, he remained to be a good and reliable kid. He remains understanding and loves his Mom a lot.
And, yes, Stargirl. I could only aspire to be as kind-hearted, understanding, and unique as her.

4. Bonus: Do you have any venue suggestions for the F2F? :D
*shakes head*


message 29: by Tin (new)

Tin (rabbitin) | 560 comments Week 2 Questions:

1. YA is a genre that targets readers aged 14 and above. And those that target 12-13 yrs old are under the Teen genre. But me, I lump those two together. YA differs from other genres in literature mostly the story is told from the perspective of a young person. And you could say that I owe YA a great deal because YA is what led me to book blogs which ultimately led me to TFG.

Also, I just realized that two of my picks in the Week 1 Questions are technically under Children's Lit. That is, if we are to follow the age range thing. Will edit them. :)

2. I find myself leaning towards those that tackle mental/physical illnesse,s and my pick, The Fault in Our Stars, fit the bill. Growing up is already hard enough as it is without throwing in a mental or physical disability in the mix. And I love it when I get to read books that deal with such a theme, treated in the most honest and empathethic of ways.

3. James Whitman from Dr. Bird's Advice for Sad Poets by Evan Roskos. Because he talks to an imaginary bird therapist, he hugs trees, he is a Walt Whitman fanboy, and he saves birds from getting run over by buses. Okay, it was actually a tastykake wrapper, but it speaks volumes on his character no?


message 30: by Lynai (new)

Lynai | 1188 comments Week 2 Questions:
1. What is YA for you? How does it differ from other genres of literature? Did it in any way affect your life (or just plainly your reading life)?

- YA for me is when the story's main character is a young-adult, such as 14 or 15 years old until 18. It differs in the writing style, where the narrative isn't that complicated to read such as long paragraphs or run-on sentences (i.e. Twilight) and the themes revolve on issues of young love, angst, the desire for freedom (at least from parental control).

Without counting the Sweet Valley books I'd read in high school, I didn't really become aware about the YA genre until I joined TFG and discovered various genres, haha. So, I guess I consider my self a late bloomer when it comes to reading YA. :)

2. What are the themes that you enjoy reading about in YA books? Does your book of choice cover any of these themes?
- I love coming of age stories, where the main protagonist learns more about himself/herself, gets out of his/her shell, makes choices because of these realizations. I also gravitate towards stories dealing with relationships, be it family or friendship.

I changed my book choice after writing my answers for Week 1 and so I'm now reading Patrick Ness's More Than This. I'm now on Chapter 4 and as what I read from reviews, this is a coming of age story so I hope I'll enjoy this one. I'm having a bit of trouble with the story-telling because the pacing is sooooo slow but I'm hanging on until I get to see what Patrick Ness is up to on this book.

3. Let's talk about characters. Who do you think is that single YA book character that is the most memorable? Tell us why in unforgettable terms.
- Top of my head, I'd say the most memorable YA character I'd read about is Katniss Everdeen of The Hunger Games because she's a hesitant heroine (and THG was the first YA dystopian book I'd read ever. I was 27 years old then, haha).

4. Bonus: Do you have any venue suggestions for the F2F? :D

- The Book Latte, Iloilo Business Park, Mandurriao, Iloilo City. :D


message 31: by Angus (new)

Angus (angusmiranda) | 4337 comments Week 3 Questions:

1. Refer to this article which is a piece that is more or less against adults reading young adult. Please list down the pros and cons of the author's opinions.

2. New young adult books have been expanding their theme explorations. Last year, Angie Thomas wrote "The Hate U Give," a young adult novel that focuses on racism and police brutality. What themes that you haven't read about yet in young adult books do you want to be addressed?

3. Can you give us a sense of today's young adult publishing atmosphere? Say it as if you were speaking to a person living under a rock.


message 32: by Angus (new)

Angus (angusmiranda) | 4337 comments Heeey! F2F details have been updated on the main post. Scroll up for more details. See you all soon!


message 33: by Monique (new)

Monique (attymonique) | 2126 comments Week 3 Questions

1. Sorry, can I not read the article? Haha. OK I just browsed very quickly. By "pros and cons" do you mean that things that I agree and disagree with in her opinion? If so, I agree that YA is written for the younger generation, and that's it. (Obviously, the article is "Against YA" so I didn't find anything positive in there for YA.) However, I disagree when the author said that "mature" readers should focus on the literary stuff. I think there's nothing wrong with reading a bit of YA. Live and let read, di ba.

2. Not sure about this. I haven't read a lot of YA so I don't know which themes have already been written about.

3. As far as publishing goes, I have no idea. But as a reader, I would probably say that it's the most popular market nowadays especially as far as the local scene is concerned. Just look at all the author events cooked up by National Book Store, look at all their book displays in their physical stores. Puro YA! Puro YA! Non-YA books are available in other bookstores (thank God) and other online stores but it's plain to see that the trend these days is towards the YA market. Because it sells.


message 34: by Tin (new)

Tin (rabbitin) | 560 comments Week 3 Questions:

1. Grabiti, dis article. Haha. Anyhu...

Pro: Adults who limit themselves to reading only YA are truly missing out on a lot.

Con: YA isn't any less sophisticated, there are just as many unsophisticated Adult Lit. I have read many a great YAs out there you guuuyz. With that said, to say that a person should be "embarassed" for reading YA is a bit too much.

2. How about religious discrimination/religious freedom? They probably have a YA book on this, I feel like. I think with the range of YA these days, they have covered a lot, if not most themes that I can think of.

3. YA publishing is flourishing. I think it's not going to decline anytime soon. And to echo Monique, over at NBS, they readlly do put out YA in the forefront a lot. I think this is especially great for our young adults because they have so much great books to choose from. In my ehem, adult life, there have been instances, while reading a YA book, that I wished I had read said book back when I was still an actual young adult.


message 35: by Regina (new)

Regina Grace (reginagrace) | 5 comments 1. Pros. If you read books with a lot more serious content, that makes you more mature? You get to discover themes that are more relevant to your adult life.

I don't agree with the author, though. I'm not really into YA but I have read some and actually liked them. They're easy reads for me- books that can be read quickly even with half the attention I give it.

And why would you need to be embarrassed for reading YA? I wouldn't be embarrassed for my mom if she decides to read Hunger Games. If I pick up a Narnia set and the salesperson asks me if it's for my kid, I'd tell her it's for the both of us.

Like what my favorite author said - Read. Read anything. Read the things they say are good for you, and the things they claim are junk. You'll find what you need to find. Just read.

2. I'm not sure. Compared to others, I think my YA reads are few. Anyway, I don't focus much on themes. I'd read on any topic/genre/author if fancy strikes.

3. For me, there's too much YA right now, more than I care to read. But I think that's only because it really isn't my preferred genre. Oh, well... it doesn't matter. A lot of people are into it, so I suppose we'll get more. Not really a bad thing. I just might find a new one I might like.


message 36: by Bisaya (last edited Jan 19, 2018 10:38PM) (new)

Bisaya Reader (bisayareader) | 19 comments I am planning to read 120 books this year. As of today (since January 1) I have read 10 book already.

I am currently reading ILLUMINAE by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff. The next books that I am going to read are THE HATE U GIVE by Angie Thomas and NEVERNIGHT by Jay Kristoff.

Y.A. is awesome.

Best Y.A. so far for me are STRANGE THE DREAMER by LAINI TAYLOR, WE ARE THE ANTS BY SHAUN DAVID HUTCHINSON, SIMON VS. THE HOMO SAPIENS AGENDA BY ALBERTII, READY PLAYER ONE BY ERNEST CLINE, VARIANT BY ROBISON WELLS AND ETC.


message 37: by Louize (last edited Jan 22, 2018 06:56AM) (new)

Louize (thepagewalker) | 1830 comments Week 3 Questions:

1. Just to be clear about this article, these are just the writer's opinions. None of these opinions were result of a study or research, except for that bit from Publisher's Weekly. As far as I am concerned, fuck her opinions and anyone who thinks the same. (view spoiler) Being a regular Slate contributor doesn't make her more erudite than every YA reader. I've met some younger generation of readers who are more socially principled and accepting. And I say that counts, big time. A reader can definitely appreciate and learn from both YA and adult genre. It all depends on the book's theme.

Pro: There’s room for pleasure, escapism, juicy plots, and satisfying endings on the shelves of the serious reader.

Con: But the YA and “new adult” boom may mean fewer teens aspire to grown-up reading, because the grown-ups they know are reading their books.

Reminder: "But some day you will be old enough to start reading fairy tales again. "- CS Lewis

2. I can't think of anything right now. Let me get back to you on that later. However, I must say, I've read some YA with PTSD and suicidal themes, which I find very interesting. I'm actually glad that those information are made readily available for younger people through novels.

3. I have no idea, really. Although, we see plenty of YA books coming out every season. It must be flourishing, I guess. I take it as a good sign that we have generations of addict readers coming after us.


message 38: by Angus (new)

Angus (angusmiranda) | 4337 comments Mommy Louize, kalma! (But honestly, this is the kind of reaction I wanted to see, haha!)

Week 4:
I just want to ask how your YA picks went for this month. This one is particularly for those who cannot attend the F2F this Saturday. Let us know if you like/hate them and why.

For those who are attending, please respond to the event invitation at the top of this thread so that we know who we'll be waiting for. Thanks!


message 39: by Maria (new)

Maria (mariasm) | 2441 comments (Catching up!)

Week 1 Questions:

1. What book are you reading for this month? Why?

- I've read Ship Breaker by Paolo Bacigalupi and The Watcher in the Shadows by Carlos Ruiz Zafon. Ship Breaker has been on my shelf for 7 years, I think haha. And The Watcher, I bought from Dasa Book Café from Bangkok (Yay!). I am finishing another book, White Crow by Marcus Sedgwick, hopefully in a day or two. Just in time for F2F!

2. What are your feelings regarding young adult? Love it or hate it?

- You all know I'm a sucker for YA books, hehe. It's fun to read most of the time, heartbreaking at times. I stick to YA because I learn something new, esp. on how kids are nowadays. This is important for me, since in 5 years, I have a teenager already. I need all the references I can find! Haha

3. Give us 3-5 young adult books that you love. If none, why do you think you haven't found a young adult book that you love?

- Graceling by Kristin Cashore
- Unwind by Neal Shusterman
- Forbidden by Tabitha Suzuma
- Please Ignore Vera Dietz by A.S. King
- Half A King by Joe Abercrombie
- The Reapers Are the Angels by Alden Bell
- Uprooted by Naomi Novik
- Tiger Lily by Jodi Lynn Anderson
- Seven Realms series by Cinda William Chima
- Lumatere Chronicles by Melina Marchetta
- Winner's Trilogy by Marie Rutkoski

Whoops, that's more than 5!


message 40: by Maria (new)

Maria (mariasm) | 2441 comments Week 2 Questions:

1. What is YA for you? How does it differ from other genres of literature? Did it in any way affect your life (or just plainly your reading life)?

- I picked up Harry Potter book 1 during my first year in college. Just browsing NBS, the blurb looked interesting, so I bought it for P125. I didn't know back then that it is YA genre, but I kinda like the idea that I am into YA na, before pa. I just get YA stories, you know? I can relate, kahit hindi naman nangyari sa akin, personally. and tough issues like child abuse and suicide, it makes me think twice of judging people who suffered from it. So I guess, reading YA made more open-minded, sensitive, and lax/chill (like don't take everything seriously, para hindi ma-stressed sa real life). I just love everything about YA, including those books that I bash. Hehehe

2. What are the themes that you enjoy reading about in YA books? Does your book of choice cover any of these themes?

- Any theme would do, although I steer clear of contemporary romance (not much pull for me). From thriller, to fantasy, sci-fi, dystopian, historical -- I can read from all themes.

3. Let's talk about characters. Who do you think is that single YA book character that is the most memorable? Tell us why in unforgettable terms.

- All the women in the fave books I mentioned in Week 1 questions. Basta may strength and spine of steel ung girl, fan ako nun for sure. I love my YA guys, but let's face it, baka mag fangirl lang ako dito sa endless list ng book boyfriends ko, so wag na lang. lol


message 41: by Maria (new)

Maria (mariasm) | 2441 comments Week 3 Questions:

1. Refer to this article which is a piece that is more or less against adults reading young adult. Please list down the pros and cons of the author's opinions.

- I've read this the year it was published. I will save my comment for F2F, para ramdam nyo ung angst ko, charot.

2. New young adult books have been expanding their theme explorations. Last year, Angie Thomas wrote "The Hate U Give," a young adult novel that focuses on racism and police brutality. What themes that you haven't read about yet in young adult books do you want to be addressed?

- stories on teens living in slums

3. Can you give us a sense of today's young adult publishing atmosphere? Say it as if you were speaking to a person living under a rock.

- Anyone can write anything YA lately. and for those seasoned YA authors, some times it's all about the money na lang, not the stories.


message 42: by KaZaam (new)

KaZaam | 151 comments Week 3 Questions:

1. Honestly, I stopped reading the article after the first few paragraphs coz I got pissed. I'm with Louize on this!

2. I don't know, I can't think of any.

3. YA publishing is flourishing. You can write anything just put turn the protagonist into a teenager and there you have it. Even writers who used to write contemporaries have branched out into YA, James Patterson, for one. Because YA is big business.


message 43: by Tin (new)

Tin (rabbitin) | 560 comments Week 4:

TFIOS was a pretty read. I think John Green excels in dialogue. The book has lots of lovely quotable quotes. Green has the tendency to wax philosophical, but I dug it. I didn't quite get invested in the characters as much as I was expecting too, though. And Gus has a teensy bit of the MPDG quality about him that made me wince a bit.

Have fun sa F2F guys! I am excited for you all with this new thing we are doing. :)


message 44: by Louize (last edited Jan 25, 2018 10:31PM) (new)

Louize (thepagewalker) | 1830 comments Week 4:

I read:

The True Adventures of Nicolo Zen - Wonderful read. It has music, magic, and those small acts of kindness we all seek in the world.

Sapphique - Full of hype and twists. Made me want to smack some people in the head along the way. It had me there.

The Inexplicable Logic of My Life - This is all feels -beautiful and encouraging. I want to hug everyone I met here.

Gathering Blue- A simple read, aiming the same theme as The Giver.

Neanderthal Opens the Door to the Universe - Advance Reader's Copy. This one delivered all the punches, they all connected. I probably cried in some places.

Wishing you guys a wonderful discussion on Saturday! ❤❤❤


message 45: by Angus (last edited Jan 25, 2018 07:10PM) (new)

Angus (angusmiranda) | 4337 comments Thank you for participating! For those who can't attend, please answer the question for Week 4 so that we can add the books in our group shelf over here.

I read Someday This Pain Will Be Useful to You - I didn't like it as much as I like the title but it was okay. I think it's a different take on The Catcher in the Rye. The themes are similar. Heck, they're even both set in New York.

We look forward to seeing you tomorrow. :)


message 46: by Pamela (new)

Pamela | 1 comments Hiya! I'm new to the group, luckily I already read a YA this month! (Also, hey, this is my first post on TFG)

1. What book are you reading for this month? Why?
I read Stardust by Neil Gaiman. It was gifted to me last Christmas and I was so happy to have received a book, I immediately read it.

2. What are your feelings regarding young adult? Love it or hate it?
I can't form a definitive opinion since I haven't read lots of YA (or lots of books for that matter, since I'm a new reader). But I definitely loved Stardust. If it's well-written and believable (and hopefully not cringy), then why not?

3. Give us 3-5 young adult books that you love. If none, why do you think you haven't found a young adult book that you love?
None yet! I haven't read any! Though I'm looking to get a copy of Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda, Howl's Moving Castle and am waiting for bookmail for The Knife of Never Letting Go! I've heard good things about them!


message 47: by Abdul (new)

Abdul (juramentado) | 55 comments Catching up! I wasn't able to join the F2F, and I was bit by a very rabid mansplainer, so here's a flood of text!

Week 2 Questions:
1. What is YA for you? How does it differ from other genres of literature? Did it in any way affect your life (or just plainly your reading life)?

YA is a genre (/marketing label covering a range of books) about self-discovery at a vulnerable stage of life. Books are usually about discovering something about yourself, but YA is specifically geared towards this.

I think it also differs in that it specifically targets an age group for relatability, because (of money haha and because) when we are adolescents, there's nothing more exciting than seeing your little, misunderstood self written by someone else. There's this drive to be understood and accepted in a confusing and seemingly hostile world, a drive much more piercing in adolescence than in any other stage of life.

Or at least that's how it is in my experience. Reading YA made me feel accepted (Chbosky's The Perks of Being a Wallflower), valued (DWJ's Charmed Life), and not alone (Cameron's Someday This Pain Will Be Useful to You). It made me feel that the world's problems are solvable (Animorphs), that it is completely okay to distance yourself from an abusive family member (Barker's Abarat series), that recovery is possible (Anderson's Speak), and that you can make your own family (Wilson's What They Always Tell Us). There's so many YA books that reached out to me when I needed them, that, for better or worse, I wouldn't be who I am right now if not for them.

2. What are the themes that you enjoy reading about in YA books? Does your book of choice cover any of these themes?

I like it when the protagonist is stuck in (or born into) a situation that breeds dislike for them. That's partially why Goblet of Fire is my favorite HP book (other than everything about it is awesome).

More Than This doesn't cover this theme, but Megan Meade's Guide to the McGowan Boys does. Megan Meade is forced to live with seven boys, of which the four eldest ones are ridiculously attractive, so, naturally, in YA logic, the school's girls resent her. It's stupid fun. A Separate Peace almost features this, but the book is more concerned with other things.

I wish there were more YA books where the protagonist is an ethnic minority.

3. Let's talk about characters. Who do you think is that single YA book character that is the most memorable? Tell us why in unforgettable terms.

Hermione Granger, hands down. Harry and Ron would not have survived any school year without her. She's basically the most effective character in the series.

I would also argue for the first villain in Kate Brian's guilty pleasure book series Private and the villain protagonist in the spin-off series Privilege. (view spoiler) She's very fun to read. The author doesn't even bother to write her a sob story explaining why she is the way she is. She is pure soap-operatic evil.

4. Bonus: Do you have any venue suggestions for the F2F? :D
;___;


message 48: by Abdul (last edited Jan 31, 2018 02:17AM) (new)

Abdul (juramentado) | 55 comments Week 3 Questions:

1. Refer to this article which is a piece that is more or less against adults reading young adult. Please list down the pros and cons of the author's opinions.

It's half-baked elitist tripe. She reminds me of that Simpsons meme:



It's full of unsupported arguments, such as the claim that YA genre is replacing literary fiction. No proof given at all. Can someone please tell me where in god's green earth they are holding this all-powerful global conspiracy conference?

She writes that not liking the trappings of YA makes her a grown-up. It's an argument undercut by the phenomenon that sparked her to write in the first place: a lot of grown-ups read and like YA. Maybe it's not that she's a grown-up. Maybe it's because she's a snob. For all of her adult literary reading, she hasn't yet learned a very basic lesson: not liking something does not mean you are better than those who like it. It just means you're different.

Two of her many lazy generalizations: (1) "YA books present the teenage perspective in a fundamentally uncritical way." and (2) "These endings are emblematic of the fact that the emotional and moral ambiguity of adult fiction—of the real world—is nowhere in evidence in YA fiction."

She's probably never read Kevin Brooks' Lucas, or Laurie Halse Anderson's Speak, or Brian Malloy's The Year of Ice. What does she think the books To Kill a Mockingbird, Lord of the Flies, and A Separate Peace are? Does she actually think Romeo and Juliet are fortysomethings?

"[Grown-ups reading YA are] asked to abandon the mature insights" How so? No proof given. Reading escapist books and consuming escapist entertainment does not mean one is abandoning maturity. It can mean any number of things, such as not wanting to read a waste of a Slate article.

"[If] they are substituting maudlin teen dramas for the complexity of great adult literature, then they are missing something." But what defines great? It's very telling that she qualifies "adult literature" with the word great - cop outs are very comforting when your hands are empty. And "adult literature" can be as maudlin as YA, too.

She also disparages detective novels. It's like the author doesn't even know we're in a period that has begun to reject the idea that genre and anything outside of contemporary fiction is automatically inferior. What up, Colson Whitehead, Aimee Bender, Karen Russell, Kelly Link, Ludmilla Petrushevskaya, Ted Chiang, Cormac McCarthy, Haruki Murakami, Jonathan Lethem, Jeff VanderMeer, N.K. Jemisin???

Finally, the adult literary book she recommends? Bad reviews of it on Amazon state that it's full of unnecessarily big words (read: purple prose), important characters are talking heads for tangents (read: stilted dialogue and real world infodumps), and there's an underlying Islamophobic agenda (read: her perspective on what to read probably isn't the best).

I've read far better Facebook statuses from young adults than this.

2. New young adult books have been expanding their theme explorations. Last year, Angie Thomas wrote "The Hate U Give," a young adult novel that focuses on racism and police brutality. What themes that you haven't read about yet in young adult books do you want to be addressed?

Eating disorders and body dysmorphic disorders from the perspective of male or male-identifying characters. Maybe asexuality?

3. Can you give us a sense of today's young adult publishing atmosphere? Say it as if you were speaking to a person living under a rock.

There's too much hype, and the reviewers have a need to read everything that comes out.

In Booktube, everyone talks about the new book as if it's their newest favorite discovery, and then in their year-end videos they realize that they were caught up in the hype and don't care for the book and they're sorry for having influenced you to buy it.

In Goodreads, it's about who has the best gifs to accompany their reviews of YA books.

The good thing is there's more minority representation and the pool of authors is becoming more diverse (Tahir, Mafi, and Ahdieh, among others).


message 49: by Abdul (new)

Abdul (juramentado) | 55 comments Week 4:
I just want to ask how your YA picks went for this month. This one is particularly for those who cannot attend the F2F this Saturday. Let us know if you like/hate them and why.

More Than This was all right. The book shifts gears after two hunred pages of wistful self-pity into something entirely different from what I expected and had come to love. I wouldn't mind reading an entire book simply about a dead boy coming to terms with his suicide in a deserted version of hell - that's exactly why I bought the book in the first place. But the last two-thirds of the book were fine nevertheless, and it exhausted the way Ness had also made me exhausted in The Knife of Never Letting Go. There was a point near the end when I was filled with a black urge to chuck the book out of a window after a very frustrating revelation about one of the characters.

Megan Meade's Guide to the McGowan Boys was unadulterated fluff: girl likes a boy and doesn't know better, the boys either had abs and big, toned arms or fixed greasy motorcycles or painted paintings, the archnemesis is an Aryan angel who ruins the protagonist's life, the works. It's an easy beach read. What's jarring is that it had a lot of girl hate, not just girl versus girl, but the main character's rejection of femininity, presented as if it made her cool and unique. From my understanding, that's not something an author can get a pass from reviewers nowadays. (This was published thirteen years ago.)

A Separate Peace was really well-written. I'm still mulling over it. I don't mind that it spelled out its lesson at the very last page in case it wasn't clear enough to the reader what the point of the book was, because despite the talking-down, it's an important lesson that needs to be etched in our minds. I also shipped Gene with Finny the entire time, and their bromance was lovely (view spoiler).


message 50: by Lynai (new)

Lynai | 1188 comments Can I jump straight into Week 4? Heehee.

I changed my book choice to More Than This because I preferred to read a physical book. Compared to Abdul above (hi!), I loved it. I gave it 4 stars. I think most young adults can learn a thing or two from this. I enjoyed the dystopian, sci-fi-ish vibe. Most of all I loved the philosophical, existentialist questions the book raised, and the fact that I still don't know anything about life doesn't really matter to me. I'd recommend this to my students if I could.


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