EVERYONE Has Read This but Me - The Catch-Up Book Club discussion

Murder on the Orient Express (Hercule Poirot, #10)
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CLASSICS READS > Murder On The Orient Express - *SPOILERS*

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message 1: by Kaseadillla (last edited Jan 01, 2018 07:37AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Kaseadillla | 1437 comments Mod
Hello all - starting up discussions for the JANUARY 2018 BOTMs. This discussion is for the group's poll selection for the CLASSICS category: Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie.

This discussion will be FULL OF SPOILERS. If you have not read the book yet and don't want to ruin the ending, hop on over to the spoiler-free discussion HERE .

Happy reading!
Kasey


Sarah | 799 comments I finished this last week! It was a very fun read and I 100% did not guess the outcome. Did anyone else suspect it??


Renee (elenarenee) I didn't. I did a reread and I knew the end. All the clues were there. I love the delightful shock you get when the solution is revealed. This is the book that made me rethink all books had a single killer. Christie was a genuis


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Jakobwoho | 8 comments Didnt at all figure out the intricate parts of the murderers plan, but did suspect that more than one of the passengers were involved in it all, considering that many of them had had some connection to the armstrong family


Kelly_Hunsaker_reads ... I read this a few months ago so I will not reread it. I did like the ending and found it a surprise. However, I didn't love the book. I felt it needed a lot more development. Plus, I like mysteries that provide clues and build tension in a way that the reader can solve the crime along with the protagonist. These books tend to be different. They just tell us the solutions instead of making us guess different answers.


Sarah | 799 comments I do agree with that, Agatha seems to have twists at the end of her books that are impossible to guess. But I’ve only read 2 or her works, I will definitely be trying out more eventually.


message 7: by Amy (new) - rated it 4 stars

Amy Nicole (a_nicole) | 8 comments I just finished it.
The beginning was a slow start to me, but I really loved it once it picked up the pace. I really enjoy the way she reveals things and then has secondary facts that come up that reshape what was already revealed. This is my third Christie book, and she keeps me guessing every time.


Kerri | 700 comments I really enjoy the twists Christie adds to her books; it keeps me in suspense knowing that she likes to do that. Then, even on the rare occasion that I figure it out, I am still second-guessing myself up to the end. And if I end up being right it is such a rush of accomplishment! And if I am wrong (which is more often) it entices me to look back through at the clues and see what I missed!

I really enjoyed this book. I thought more than one person was involved, but could never satisfactorily pinpoint whom exactly. I thought it was a fun book (vicious murder aside) :)


Cassinator | 43 comments I didn't love this book, but I feel like I might just not like murder mysteries, or at least ones like this. I saw the ending coming, and wasn't shocked at all. Plus I was quite bored most of the way. I guess maybe I prefer more suspense in my mysteries? I'm glad I read it though, because now I have a reference point when people talk about Agatha Christie :) Also, is anyone else planning on seeing the movie when it comes out? It looks pretty good!


Martina Bučková | 147 comments I finished the book last night and what I especially like about Agatha's books is the mysterious atmosphere she can build up and I like being surprised at the end of the book. I find it worse when I can guess the whole book at the beginning, then I have to force myself to read it till end. For sure I will come back to her books, I was always of the opinion that these books are for older generation but never read them :) . Now I know why so many people are her fans.


Rachelnyc I read this book last year and it was my first Christie novel. I generally steer clear of mystery books because the ones I've read have been easy to figure out and become boring to me once I discover the twist.

This certainly kept me guessing and I intend to read more of her novels in the future. Do any Christie fans have specific recommendations for her other works?


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Jakobwoho | 8 comments People who have read other Christie novels, which is the best one?


Kimberly Wendt | 203 comments My favorite by far is And Then There Were None.

The Murder of Roger Ackroyd is probably my second favorite.

Other ones I've marked as 5 stars include:

A Holiday for Murder
Murder at the Vicarage
The Big Four
The Secret Adversary
Poirot Investigates
Parker Pyne Investigates
The Mysterious Affair at Styles
The Man in the Brown Suit

I've read over 30 of Christie's novels so far...trying to make my way through all of them :)


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Jakobwoho | 8 comments Wow! It's cool you've read so many of them! Looked it up now, and apparently there are 33 Poirot novels and 50 (!) short stories.

After finishing Murder on the Orient Express, I'm feeling interested in reading some other books about Poirot. Maybe 'And then there were none' is a good second book to continue with.


Kimberly Wendt | 203 comments And Then There Were None is great but no Poirot in that novel, if that’s what you’re looking for. Christie has several different “series” plus stand-alone books. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd is a Poirot novel though!


Cheryl (cherylllr) | 976 comments I don't like modern mysteries or thrillers... however, this is my third Christie and it won't be my last. But I was def. surprised at the end. I really don't know how I could have figured it out... maybe someday I'll be a better clue-interpreter.


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Rose | 9 comments I don’t know if it was because I’ve seen the film, with it’s big dramatic ending, but I felt the book lacked a decent ending. I get that Agatha’s big ending was the revealing of the murderers but her Poirot lacked enthusiasm. Kenneth Branaghs portrayal of the detective showed him battling with his conscience but here it was just ‘I retire from the case’ ...


message 18: by Amy (new) - rated it 4 stars

Amy Nicole (a_nicole) | 8 comments Rose wrote: "I don’t know if it was because I’ve seen the film, with it’s big dramatic ending, but I felt the book lacked a decent ending. I get that Agatha’s big ending was the revealing of the murderers but h..."

I'm really curious as to how the movie interpreted the story. I may have to check it out.
This book definitely felt more like a classic mystery where it was kind of stripped of the deep character emotions.


Aesaan (highlycaffeinatedreader) | 95 comments Kimberly wrote: "My favorite by far is And Then There Were None.

The Murder of Roger Ackroyd is probably my second favorite.

Other ones I've marked as 5 stars include:

[book:A Holiday f..."

Wow thats really amazing.. youve got to read most of Christie's novels... ive only read And Then There Were None and Murder on the Orient Express... loved both but the former is a classic


Debbie | 23 comments WHAT???!! Great ending! I love Agatha Christie because you can never figure out the ending. This is by far the best ending. I'm so glad to have read this book finally.


Cheryl (cherylllr) | 976 comments I thought it was going to be the doctor, or even the director, Bouc. After all, we never investigated their whereabouts or luggage....


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Dawn Podojil I read this yesterday and stayed up a little late to finish last night. What the what?! I had no idea! None!

I told my husband I had it narrowed down to 2 people with 30 pages left to read. This morning I've been sitting here at work going over all the facts. They are all there I just missed them all!


Jessica | 8 comments I'm debating whether or not I want to reread this, but I really loved this book! In fact the very next week when I went to Half Price Books I found about 50 of her books for about 30 cents apiece, and have been collecting them ever since!

Has anyone seen the movie? I'm debating getting it as it has a ton of actors that I recognize and I want to know how they put it together, especially since the book is mostly dialogue.


message 24: by Catie (last edited Jan 10, 2018 10:50PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Catie Currie | 98 comments I actually didn't like this one as much as some of her other books (like And Then There Were None, so good!), but it was still definitely worth reading. You should see the movie Jessica, they definitely changed some things, but it was still really good-- in my opinion :P


Leesa I’m so pleased that I finally read this book. I did prefer the other novel we read of hers, ‘And then there were none’ though.

I did enjoy reading the book, it was suspenseful and I didn’t guess the ending. They were pointing at two killers so much I concluded that it had to be one!

I would definitely read more of hers in future, I can get through them really quickly and as a slow reader that is enticing!


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Yolanda Rico | 55 comments I just finished this book and I am not going to lie, I was a little disappointed. I found the book very slow to start. Maybe if I reread I would enjoy it more. I did find the ending pretty shocking but this isn't the type of mystery I enjoy.


Amanda | 64 comments This was a reread for me. My mom picked up a sack of Christie's books at a garage sale when I was young. And Then There Were None was my favorite of the lot. But this story is definitely up there.

I always enjoyed this book for the case itself. The idea that these 12 people were able to commit the almost perfect murder (except for the unexpected snow) captivates me each time. I don't actually like Poirot, the character; he's too fussy for me.


message 28: by John (new) - rated it 5 stars

John (keepmarchingon) | 7 comments Until the last few pages I suspected M. Bouc did it. It’s the classic “the one person no one suspected” cliche, plus it would explain how everyone got ticketed to the same train—a director of the company t all put them there. Not to mention how we never get a good description of him, which could identify him as the short man with the womanly voice.


Isabel I listened to this book, and there were times that I was really engaged with the story, but other times I felt it dragged. The investigator repeated all the clues several times, which made me want to skip forward, but I didn't. I figured out that they were all involved, but there were still enough twists to keep me interested, especially the true identity of Mrs. Hubbard (Daisy's grandmother).


Ashley | 20 comments Very excited to be starting this tonight! First-time book club read :)


Brandi | 115 comments I usually read books before I see the movie, but I actually saw this one first. That being said, I knew the ending before reading it, but I'm enjoying it nonetheless. This is the first Agatha Christie book I've read, and I may be addicted. I'm about halfway through. Just started it a couple hours ago. Suuuuper quick read!


Brandi | 115 comments John wrote: "Until the last few pages I suspected M. Bouc did it. It’s the classic “the one person no one suspected” cliche, plus it would explain how everyone got ticketed to the same train—a director of the c..."

When I was first introduced to the story, I was going with the Dwight Schrute "most medium suspicious" ;)


message 33: by Ana (new) - rated it 5 stars

Ana (acmquez) | 8 comments I read this a month ago and loved it. it was my first Agatha book and then i went on to read "and then there were none". I thought I knew who did it as I was reading it, and then the end came and I never saw it coming. Definitely a must read.


Sally taylor (sallyjanet) | 248 comments I loved this book. Read it in one sitting, I couldn't put it down and had no idea what the ending was going to be. Plan on watching the old film and the 2017 film over the next couple days.


Kimberly | 1 comments Kelly wrote: "I read this a few months ago so I will not reread it. I did like the ending and found it a surprise. However, I didn't love the book. I felt it needed a lot more development. Plus, I like mysteries..."

I just finished the book, and I felt the exact same way. I liked the ending and found it surprising, but I didn't love the book overall. This was my first Christie book, and maybe I was expecting too much but I felt it lacked proper development. It was a slow start for me, but picked up enough to keep my interest. I kept looking for a deeper development, but it never came. Throughout reading the book, I kept thinking, "this is a little disappointing. I was expecting much better from the great Agatha Christie." At the end, I thought, "well, that was a good ending." Again this was my first Agatha Christie book, so maybe I was just expecting something different than what she provides. I don't think it completely turns me away from reading any of her other works - I think I would definitely be willing to give them a try. And knowing now what to expect of her writing style, I might enjoy some of her other works better. Would I recommend this book to others? Quite possibly, yes, depending on the reader.


Kristin Ames (kmames) | 152 comments I have only read a few Agatha Christie books, but I’ve enjoyed them all. I am normally pretty good at murder mysteries and solve them way ahead of the characters, but not Agatha Christie mysteries, I mean what a crafty b***h...I love it! Like some others on here I thought the bad guy was Bouc, boy did I blow that one. Nice job what fun. Let’s do another!


Alycia Howard | 14 comments Cheryl wrote: "I thought it was going to be the doctor, or even the director, Bouc. After all, we never investigated their whereabouts or luggage...."

I also thought it was the doctor! Especially since they were trying to figure out who the small dark man (or woman) with a womanish voice was and the doctor was described as a "little dark man."

I really enjoyed the twist in the end and did not see it coming. I liked that all the characters had their own distinct personalities. I just wished that Poirot had a bit more personality. This was my first Agatha Christie book so maybe Poirot's character develops more in the series? Overall I really enjoyed the book.


James Speiker | 9 comments I feel I have seen this theme before. I think classic novels has the problem of being borrowed or inspire stories with a modern take. I knew the twist and how the crime was committed, just not who they all really were. Even though I "solved" the mystery, I was still surprised that they decided let it go unsolved. I was under the impression about super sleuths needing the truth be the ultimate reward and the law being the noblest goal. Nope. The murderer got off at the stop before... I'm not complaining. Just surprised.


message 39: by Todd (last edited Jan 15, 2018 02:14PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Todd | 2 comments Kimberly wrote: "Kelly wrote: "I read this a few months ago so I will not reread it. I did like the ending and found it a surprise. However, I didn't love the book. I felt it needed a lot more development. Plus, I ..."

I must third this sentiment. After reading "And Then There Were None" and being the avid mystery/whodunit fan I figured Agatha Christie could do no wrong. To say she did wrong isn't fair but I was a little let down by this one. Maybe I went in with too high of expectations but the complexities of the plot, in my opinion, seemed lackluster when viewed as the sum of their parts.

That is to say Poirot is a master of deductive reasoning (you know, these detective types) but I didn't feel like I was with him with all of the clues. The individual twists of each interviewees accounts at the end was certainly entertaining but the way they fit together seemed such a cop-out. There was not too much deduction, just more of a mass confession to lying on behalf of nearly all of the passengers in the coach.

The way all the parts fit together is clever when viewed at certain angles, but just the same we never really get a good payoff where the actual chain of events is given. Instead it's a series of individualized fail-safes that collectively allow these people protective revenge. This really removes the level of importance for the carefully scrutinized clues. For instance, there's so much focus on the timing (with the watch clue) when really at the end it was a moot point. There was no "tell" or contribution by that clue other than the attempt to mislead--which Piorot averted easily.

All that aside, I found the french dialogue clue and the inability of Mr. Rachett to speak it, to be extremely clever. It's these types of detective mechanics that I crave.

Maybe I'm just jaded and went in with super high hopes, and I will continue to read Agatha, but this one felt all too fanatical. It keep self-reflecting on the extreme circumstances it was based within. I certainly got the humor of the self referential dialogue but even the entire plot complexity was so over-the-top it seemed to discredit itself and borderline felt like a deus machina-ized ending. Something I think detective fiction should never feel like.

If I completely missed something, please enlighten me.


Cheryl (cherylllr) | 976 comments I'm with you, Todd.


Chris | 7 comments Last week, I finished listening to the audiobook of Murder On the Orient Express narrated by David Suchet. I had already seen the series Poirot starring David Suchet as Poirot. I must say that they series was very faithful to the book, and I enjoyed the book as immensely as I did the BBC series.


message 42: by Arik (new) - rated it 4 stars

Arik Manley (revolution666) | 7 comments LOL, didn't even realize that this was a book of the month. Just finished reading this over my last two days at work. My first time reading Agatha Christie and I actually enjoyed it a LOT more than I though I would! The ending is insane too, loved it. I might see the new movie at some point, but I think I'm more interested in the Sidney Lumet adaptation. I definitely want to see that one.


Trisha | 430 comments I finished this book today. Although I hadn’t read it before, I had seen the old film years ago & remembered how it ended. On the whole I was disappointed & found the book very dated. I have other Agatha Christie books on my wish list, but am no longer sure I want to read them.


daniela (daniela_nieblina) | 342 comments Classic mystery, as in it has little emotional connection and reads like a puzzle.

I loved it!

Today's mysteries need to have allot more 'padding', they can't be bare sticks and bones because we require more. Tastes in literature and entertainment have changed, so a book like this might strike some as boring and cut-and-dry. I admit even I was kinda bored at first, and was dutifully pressing play simply because I had to. But as the mystery grew, I was enthralled.


message 45: by Arik (new) - rated it 4 stars

Arik Manley (revolution666) | 7 comments Daniela wrote: "Classic mystery, as in it has little emotional connection and reads like a puzzle.

I loved it!

Today's mysteries need to have allot more 'padding', they can't be bare sticks and bones because we..."


That's how it was for me. Up until you got all twelve or so people on the train it was pretty slow and only mildly interesting. But once everything set into motion it became much more absorbing and I ended up getting through the entirety of the first parts some 200+ pages in in one day.


isabella (hamiets) I just finished reading this book the other night and I enjoyed it a lot more than I thought I would! I'm not the biggest enthusiast of mystery stories, but I'm glad that my perspective has broadened a little bit because of this book.

This is my first Agatha book, so I was unsure what to expect when I started reading it. I did see the ending coming though, so I wasn't too surprised... I was thinking that it was strange how there were plenty of different people on board the train when supposedly it was a quiet time in the year.. that raised my suspicions from the get go. But it was definitely a different ending from the 'usual'. I think I'll check on some of her other works for more unusual/surprising endings.

Oh, and I hear the movie adaptation with Branagh is quite good? I'm definitely gonna see it now! All in all... good read!


daniela (daniela_nieblina) | 342 comments Isabella wrote: "I just finished reading this book the other night and I enjoyed it a lot more than I thought I would! I'm not the biggest enthusiast of mystery stories, but I'm glad that my perspective has broaden..."

I want to see it as well! I didn't go watch it because I wanted to read the book first... but now I need to rent it stat!
I'm pretty sure there will be tone differences. The movie looks intense, I feel like it will be more about the morality and mental state of the passengers than about the who-dun-it.

Arik wrote: "Daniela wrote: "Classic mystery, as in it has little emotional connection and reads like a puzzle.

I loved it!

Today's mysteries need to have allot more 'padding', they can't be bare sticks and ..."


Yes, its odd isn't it? The beginning is much like what we would expect a book to be, with descriptions and settings. But the second half, which was so good, was extremely bare boned and simplistic. Yet I couldn't help but be sucked in!


Kaseadillla | 1437 comments Mod
Just finished. Was pleasantly surprised by the ending. Not sure this was a home run for me, but definitely kept me guessing.


Mariella | 10 comments I finished the book in one day because it was so engrossing. But I thought it ended rather abruptly. I was hoping to find out more about the perspectives of each individual, and what happened between Michael and Mary.


message 50: by Amy (new) - rated it 4 stars

Amy Nicole (a_nicole) | 8 comments James wrote: "I feel I have seen this theme before. I think classic novels has the problem of being borrowed or inspire stories with a modern take. I knew the twist and how the crime was committed, just not who ..."

What I found interesting is that morally, it made the most sense for them to let the people get away with the murder... if technically by law they should have trusted the legal system and not taken the matter in their own hands.


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