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message 1: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5349 comments Wasn't sure where to ask this question. I was watching Sunday Morning, and this girl/young adult was talking about selling vodka for over $100 a bottle. The water they were adding to this vodka was harvested from fog over San Francisco. A guy had a facility that captured the fog that was added to the vodka. This girl/young adult, said that you could taste the fog in the vodka.

My question is about the contents of the fog. Doesn't it have impurities gathered from the atmosphere? Is fog a good ingredient to add to vodka?


message 2: by Mehreen (new)

Mehreen Ahmed (mehreen2) | 1911 comments Well it sort of begs the question, is rain water or stream water drinkable? U have had rain water, I lived. I know people have had stream water, they lived too.


message 3: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5349 comments Is it a good ingredient for vodka for sale?


message 4: by Mehreen (last edited Dec 31, 2017 11:09PM) (new)

Mehreen Ahmed (mehreen2) | 1911 comments It should be okay, I believe. I don't really think the adding fog to Vodka instead of plain water would change the chemistry of either.


message 5: by Leonie (new)

Leonie (leonierogers) | 1579 comments Scout wrote: "Wasn't sure where to ask this question. I was watching Sunday Morning, and this girl/young adult was talking about selling vodka for over $100 a bottle. The water they were adding to this vodka was..."

I suspect it's more about the method of collection and any filtration processes. It also possibly depends on time of collection, and if there was no filtration, I'd suspect there'd be some kind of particulate matter in the 'fog water.'

And...it could simply be a load of bunkum!


message 6: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13503 comments With vodka, manufacturers often trump up the purity of the water they use, that it should somehow differentiate them from others..
Wouldn't pay a hundred bucks for any vodka, but I can volunteer to be a guinea pig for consumer satisfaction experiment


message 7: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5349 comments I'm with you on that. What I was thinking of, though, was that fog might contain impurities gathered from the atmosphere. I'm thinking of acid rain. Is collected fog a pure ingredient, something you want to drink?


message 8: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13503 comments The chemists among us would know better, but I wouldn't rely on fog's purity in highly polluted places, where people wear masks (anti-pollution, not just playing role games) outdoors..
Although growing in post-Chernobyl radiation, I wonder whether polluted fog would compound much to my inner impurity -:)


message 9: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9516 comments Any impurity that is water soluble will be in the fog, and small particulate matter might seed a fog droplet. Seems an odd way of collecting water, unless you are in some sort of desert. The most spectacular example I saw was once in Tashkent - a fog on a beautiful sunny day, around an old factory. It was a fog initiated by hydrogen chloride coming from this old shed attracting water out of the air and creating the fog. It seemed to happen frequently because all the steel work nearby was horribly corroded.


message 10: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5349 comments This vodka would blend right in with your inner impurity, Nik :-) This company, charging $100+ per bottle, touts this fog ingredient, gathered from the San Francisco Bay, as pure, tasty, and worth the money. It just seems hokey to me.


message 11: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9516 comments $100 for a bottle of impure water seems extortionate to me. Distilled seawater would be a lot cheaper.


message 12: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13503 comments Ian wrote: "$100 for a bottle of impure water seems extortionate to me. Distilled seawater would be a lot cheaper."

Scout wrote: ......pure, tasty, and worth the money. It just seems hokey to me."

Maybe it offers an exquisite pollution blend, getting people drunk and high simultaneously? Ensuring a double effect may be worth a little extra -:)


message 13: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9516 comments Can we put you down, Nik, for a special $100 bottle of exotic water??


message 14: by Graeme (new)

Graeme Rodaughan Breakdown of the price (est.)

$4.99 The actual vodka.
$0.99 The bottle and the label.
$1.99 The packaging, distribution and warehousing.
$92.03 The Fog

Cost to produce $7.97
Profit $92.03


message 15: by Leonie (new)

Leonie (leonierogers) | 1579 comments ^^^^Crikey!

Someone's hoping to make a lot of money from other peoples' gullibility.


message 16: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13503 comments Ian wrote: "Can we put you down, Nik, for a special $100 bottle of exotic water??"

I hear after every high there is an inevitable down. I'm at your service -:)


message 17: by Nik (last edited Jan 07, 2018 02:00AM) (new)

Nik Krasno | 13503 comments Graeme wrote: "Breakdown of the price (est.)

$4.99 The actual vodka.
$0.99 The bottle and the label.
$1.99 The packaging, distribution and warehousing.
$92.03 The Fog

Cost to produce $7.97
Profit $92.03"


If analysts are reading this, the stock may soon skyrocket -:)


message 18: by Graeme (new)

Graeme Rodaughan est = estimate = my guess....


message 19: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13503 comments The last and only time I bought a hundred buck drink was Oban Little Bay in our Airport's Duty Free, where 'free' is the most cynical word in its name.
Nice scotch, but wasn't sufficiently impressive to justify this price, so I don't buy the fog anymore ..


message 20: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9516 comments In my novel on the colonization of Mars I had the initial settlements' main water supply the condensation of water from the atmosphere, and there was not even fog. I gather in the Peruvian desert area there are fogs, at least sometimes, so maybe there is scope for an entrepreneur there? Then recently we had a drought, and W Forecast had the occasional prediction of rain, but all we got was something that would not even qualify as a fog, so maybe with climate change this will be an opportunity.

If Leonie is reading this, she will be pleased to note that (a) the drought was all Australia's fault 😟 The big High pressure systems off Central Australia were working their way over here and pushing the rain-makers to the south, but (b) Australia also came to the rescue 😀. A tropical depression generated off Queensland bore down and deposited huge floods, which would lead to a "water from fog" venture get somewhat washed away


message 21: by Leonie (new)

Leonie (leonierogers) | 1579 comments Ian wrote: "In my novel on the colonization of Mars I had the initial settlements' main water supply the condensation of water from the atmosphere, and there was not even fog. I gather in the Peruvian desert a..."

Oh good. We did it all! Both drought and cure :)

Here, in the area I live, we're having a horrible heatwave. The thermometer I popped out the back yesterday read 47 C.... It was hot for hours last night - actually it was hot until it got hotter this morning again.

Tomorrow's forecast is for 41C.

For those of you from Fahrenheit using countries, that would be 116.6 yesterday, and 105.8 tomorrow. It was 43, or 109 today...

Can't wait for the cool change on Wednesday. It'll only be 30C (86F).


message 22: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9516 comments Leonie, my sympathies. I really felt for the English trying to play cricket in Sydney - apparently someone took a temperature reading of 50 C at the SCG. I have no idea how you can play active sports in that sort of furnace. Here we are having days at 30 C and that feels hot, although here the humidity is also rather high, the air having come off the ocean, and that humidity get at you.


message 23: by Leonie (new)

Leonie (leonierogers) | 1579 comments Ian wrote: "Leonie, my sympathies. I really felt for the English trying to play cricket in Sydney - apparently someone took a temperature reading of 50 C at the SCG. I have no idea how you can play active spor..."

I lived for about 16 years in the Pilbara, where >37 degrees happened every day for about six months of the year. You did adapt after a while, particularly if you exercised regularly in the heat. Making sure you didn't dehydrate was also very important, as you can imagine!

I remember one day doing a vertical rescue (was in the State Emergency Service) and getting through at least ten litres of water all by myself, not to mention some other drinks as well. I'd also sweated so much that my overalls were damp, despite the night time temperature being above 30.

I rather like winter now...


message 24: by Graeme (new)

Graeme Rodaughan Leonie wrote: "Ian wrote: "Leonie, my sympathies. I really felt for the English trying to play cricket in Sydney - apparently someone took a temperature reading of 50 C at the SCG. I have no idea how you can play..."

Hence your stories are based on personal experience (extrapolated...) :-). Well done by the way. SES and all.


message 25: by Leonie (new)

Leonie (leonierogers) | 1579 comments Graeme wrote: "Leonie wrote: "Ian wrote: "Leonie, my sympathies. I really felt for the English trying to play cricket in Sydney - apparently someone took a temperature reading of 50 C at the SCG. I have no idea h..."

Yes, somewhat extrapolated! 😝 Loved SESing when we were there. You get to do all kinds of things that you'd never do anywhere else, when you live in the Pilbara.


message 26: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9516 comments I hadn't really thought too much about this, but having experienced extremes should help your descriptive writing. Pilbara sounds like a place that needs air conditioning and lots of water, so I can understand Leonie liking winter a bit. The nearest I have come to that was one day in mid July were I did some hill climbing in The Valley of the Kings. The area is a bit like an oven, and taking a large water bottle seemed essential at the time. But a year in Canada (Alberta) put me off extreme winters.


message 27: by Leonie (new)

Leonie (leonierogers) | 1579 comments Ian wrote: "I hadn't really thought too much about this, but having experienced extremes should help your descriptive writing. Pilbara sounds like a place that needs air conditioning and lots of water, so I ca..."

I really like snow, but I think it's probably because I just ski on it and don't have to live in it. 😝


message 28: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9516 comments Trying to dig my car out of a snow drift in a howling Canadian blizzard made me less keen on real cold.


message 29: by Leonie (new)

Leonie (leonierogers) | 1579 comments Ian wrote: "Trying to dig my car out of a snow drift in a howling Canadian blizzard made me less keen on real cold."

I can imagine!


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