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New School Classics- 1900-1999 > Ulysses -- Read Along 1st Qtr 2018

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message 1: by Katy, New School Classics (new)

Katy (kathy_h) | 9439 comments Mod
This thread is for those who wish to read along with us at a 3-month pace for the book Ulysses by James Joyce.

Please do not post any spoilers past the section listed for the read along.


message 2: by Katy, New School Classics (new)

Katy (kathy_h) | 9439 comments Mod
Ulysses Read Along Schedule 2018

Jan 1 -- I
Episode 1: Telemachus
Episode 2: Nestor
Episode 3: Proteus

Jan 8 -- II
Episode 4: Calypso
Episode 5: Lotus Eaters
Episode 6: Hades

Jan 15 -- II
Episode 7: Aeolus
Episode 8: Lestrygonians

Jan 22 -- II
Episode 9: Scylla and Charybdis

Jan 29 -- II
Episode 10: The Wandering Rocks
Episode 11: Sirens

Feb 5 -- II
Episode 12: Cyclops

Feb 12 -- II
Episode 13: Nausicaa

Feb 19 -- II
Episode 14: Oxen of the Sun

Feb 26 -- II
Episode 15: Circe

Mar 5 -- III
Episode 16: Eumaeus

Mar 12 -- III
Episode 17: Ithaca

Mar 19 -- III
Episode 18: Penelope

Mar 26
Introduction and Book as a Whole


message 3: by Petra (new)

Petra I just read this for the umpteenth time last year and won't reread it again (yet). I will lurk in the discussion, if no one minds. I enjoy a good Ulysses discussion.


message 4: by Matt (new)

Matt (mmullerm) | 820 comments I am very interested in this group read of Ulysses. I had not planned to read it yet but just might join in since it is being read over the first quarter. I’ve found some very inexpensive versions for Nook. Decisions, decisions! : )


message 5: by Leni (new)

Leni Iversen (leniverse) | 1220 comments Oh good! A schedule. That will help. I'll have to be organised with this one. Now I just need the library to open again so I can pick up a copy!


message 6: by Nina (new)

Nina Ive | 69 comments a schedule is awesome. I'm so daunted by this book and also the reviews which say it is one of the hardest books to read... I"ll give it a go with this group I think! Thanks in advance


message 7: by MJ (new)

MJ | 184 comments Well. I'm going to give this a go. I'm not sure if I'll get through!


message 8: by siriusedward (new)

siriusedward (elenaraphael) | 2052 comments Well.I have it on my Serial reader.And the schedule will help too.Thanks Katy.


message 9: by Katy, New School Classics (new)

Katy (kathy_h) | 9439 comments Mod
MJ wrote: "Well. I'm going to give this a go. I'm not sure if I'll get through!"

Me either, I plan to start reading with some trepidation.


Jen from Quebec :0) (muppetbaby99) | 216 comments 2018 will be starting off with a bang! I am also reading Vanity Fair with another group. Oh boy. I am excited and anxious about these daunting books, you know? --Jen from Quebec :0)


message 11: by Petra (new)

Petra I listened to the audio version in 2017 and thought it was easy to follow (if one paid close attention). The words flowed really well and it was easier (I thought) to tell when a person was speaking or thinking in their head.
My audio version was 40 CDs long. It read at a nice pace that allowed my mind to follow and keep up.


Jen from Quebec :0) (muppetbaby99) | 216 comments Do you need to read Joyce's A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man before Ulysses? I understand that the same character is in both books...? --Jen from Quebec :0)


message 13: by Kimberly (new)

Kimberly | 9 comments This will be my first time joining in so I am excited. The schedule really helps--keeps me on track!


message 14: by Carlo (new)

Carlo | 206 comments I read this a few years ago but it really benefits from a group read as there are so many areas of discussion where other people can help to view things from a different perspective.

I will listen to the famous RTE (Irish tv) audio version (by far the best), read by Irish actors. It used to be quite expensive but is now available to download or stream for free via the following link:

https://archive.org/details/Ulysses-A...


message 15: by Carlo (new)

Carlo | 206 comments Jennifer Lynn wrote: "Do you need to read Joyce's A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man before Ulysses? I understand that the same character is in both books...? --Jen from Quebec :0)"

Not at all. Whilst a bit of background about Stephen Dedalus might be helpful it's by no means necessary. Ulysses deals with different aspects of his life and contrasts/compares him with Bloom. There are so many other characters to Ulysses as well (some of which pop up in Portrait and Dubliners) that you will soon find yourself with more than enough occupy yourself without worrying too much about Stephen's background.


message 16: by Carlo (new)

Carlo | 206 comments Episode 3: Proteus

This is the chapter which caused me to quit the book twice previously. Whilst it is some people's favourite chapter I found it the most difficult (after Oxen) because it's so abstract and philosophical and I thought the rest of the book would be like this - it isn't. My advice to those who feel as I did is either to persevere with Proteus (without trying to understand everything) or skip it and come back to it later.


message 17: by Zdenka (new)

Zdenka Mladina Dadas | 3 comments I read Ulysses many, many years ago as part of required high school reading and I don't remember a thing except that it was long and boring book.
This year I got complete novels of James Joyce as a Christmas present so this challenge comes at the right time.
Schedule will be great help and your discussion of course, since I will be reading it in English.
I am Croatian, English is not my first or native language and 30.000 different English words is huge challenge for me!


message 18: by Karen (new)

Karen Witzler (kewitzler) I want to buy a hard copy today - which edition? Gabler? Modern Library hardcover? Vintage paperback shown? Does it matter?


message 19: by Melanti (new)

Melanti | 2384 comments I'm way too chicken to attempt to read this outside of a group read, so it's now or never!


message 20: by MJ (new)

MJ | 184 comments Matt wrote: "I am very interested in this group read of Ulysses. I had not planned to read it yet but just might join in since it is being read over the first quarter. I’ve found some very inexpensive versions ..."

You can read a free copy from gutenberg.org! One of the discussion threads here has a link to another free version.


message 21: by Karen (new)

Karen Witzler (kewitzler) Maybe I will try the online version...


message 22: by Sara, Old School Classics (new)

Sara (phantomswife) | 5048 comments Mod
I have tried (and failed) at this book twice. I'm hoping reading it slowly along with the group will make it palatable for me.


message 23: by Gini (new)

Gini | 198 comments Going to try this one, too. I'm going in naive. What I've read so far isn't awful. So maybe there's a tiny ray of hope to go on with it some more.


message 24: by Sue (new)

Sue K H (sky_bluez) | 3183 comments Carlo wrote: "I read this a few years ago but it really benefits from a group read as there are so many areas of discussion where other people can help to view things from a different perspective.

I will listen..."


Thank you Carlo, this is wonderful!

I started with serial reader and audio with reading first and then listening to the same section (Jim Norton version).

I was getting frustrated with serial reader because it ends in awkward spots so I got a Kindle addition for $99cents

I thought the Jim Norton version was wonderful but
I really like this Irish television version even better. I love how the stream of consciousness thoughts are given in a ghost like quality that really separates them. This helps immensely.

It will be harder to sync this with reading but I'm going to try.


message 25: by Teija (new)

Teija (neitit) | 9 comments Just my luck that when I join this group Ulysses is the next quarterly read!

I am a bit intimidated but still excited. I got the English version from the library but if that seems to be too much I can switch to Finnish ebook version. I do not expect to get much from this during the first read. I just want to read the whole thing so that I am familiar with it and then maybe someday return to it and spend more time understanding the book.


message 26: by Fab (new)

Fab | 6 comments Thanks for the schedule! I finished A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man in December so I’m very eager to start!


message 27: by Sue (new)

Sue K H (sky_bluez) | 3183 comments Teija wrote: "Just my luck that when I join this group Ulysses is the next quarterly read!

I am a bit intimidated but still excited. I got the English version from the library but if that seems to be too much I..."


I feel the same way Teija. I have found that if I go into more difficult books with this attitude, it relaxes me and I end up getting more out of them than I would have if I was worried about understanding everything.


message 28: by MJ (last edited Jan 01, 2018 11:59AM) (new)

MJ | 184 comments I am 3/4 of the way through Episode 1 and what strikes me most is how many words in the English language has been lost. (I say that but it is not the first time a book has made me think this). I have an online dictionary open in another tab as I read, to help me with unfamiliar words. Perfectly good, interesting, useful words that exist in the English language that have fallen into disuse.

There have been other classics I've read where I kept a list of new (old) words I hadn't seen or used before, but the list became too long and the words too many. What can you do with these words? It's not like I can start incorporating them into daily use.


message 29: by J_BlueFlower (new)

J_BlueFlower (j_from_denmark) | 1510 comments I­ am joining this group read. Tried reading Ulysses many years ago and gave up after about 50 pages. I have the English original and a Danish translation ready. I am downloading the audiobook Carlo linked. (Thank you!) I will start reading after Romeo and Juliet (the January old school read). I am glad we are so many. I hope we can carry each other trough. ­


message 30: by Leni (new)

Leni Iversen (leniverse) | 1220 comments I have a free version on my Kindle, but I have reserved an annotated (by Sam Slote) edition at the library. It is based on the 1939 Odyssey Press edition, and I'm honestly not sure what the difference is. I just know I'll need a paper edition of this, and annotated is good! Hopefully it will be ready for me in the next couple of days. Although I suppose I could start reading on the Kindle.


message 31: by Sue (new)

Sue K H (sky_bluez) | 3183 comments MJ wrote: "I am 3/4 of the way through Episode 1 and what strikes me most is how many words in the English language has been lost. (I say that but it is not the first time a book has made me think this). I ha..."


funny, I was thinking he was making up words! When he's in his self conscious anyway, many of the words seem ridiculous. Maybe some are unique to the Irish? He does mention "speaking Irish" a few times, so I was wondering about that.


message 32: by siriusedward (last edited Jan 01, 2018 01:13PM) (new)

siriusedward (elenaraphael) | 2052 comments Finished Episode 1.Now to make heads or tails of it.


But, only Haines spoke Irish ,right?

I downloaded the Gutenberg epub version .


message 33: by Sue (new)

Sue K H (sky_bluez) | 3183 comments siriusedward wrote: "Finished Episode 1.Now to make heads or tails of it.


But, only Haines spoke Irish ,right?

I downloaded the Gutenberg epub version ."


I don't know. His subconscious is where I have trouble with words. That and the Latin. Not worried since those two things comprise only 80% of the book so far. heehee


message 34: by Kimberly (new)

Kimberly | 9 comments MJ wrote: "I am 3/4 of the way through Episode 1 and what strikes me most is how many words in the English language has been lost. (I say that but it is not the first time a book has made me think this). I ha..."

There were quite a few words I highlighted on my Kindle that yielded no results. I still have to look them up (I was quite comfy at the time, and didn't want to move to get my phone, dictionary, etc.)


message 35: by Sue (new)

Sue K H (sky_bluez) | 3183 comments Besides possibly using made up words or English slang that is unique to the old Irish, he combines two and three words into one word quite often. I'm not sure if this is a common feature of stream of consciousness or just his thing. At first I thought it was an editing problem but it happens on my serial reader edition and my Kindle one. It also happens too often to be happenstance.


message 36: by Christine (new)

Christine | 1217 comments I had no intention of joining in this group read or of reading Ulysses at all. However, now reading everyone's comments on this and the No Spoilers thread has piqued my interest. I downloaded a whisper synced Kindle and audio pair, in the hope that my help me get through this. I will try to follow the three month schedule (thanks, Katy!).

We'll see how this goes... yikes!


message 37: by Sue (new)

Sue K H (sky_bluez) | 3183 comments Mark wrote: "Sue wrote: "Besides possibly using made up words or English slang that is unique to the old Irish, he combines two and three words into one word quite often. I'm not sure if this is a common featur..."

That's interesting Mark. Smog is one that was meaningful enough to go into wide use whereas his are his long obtrusive and not likely to be repeated ( like your dressinggown example and longer). He seems to have missed the point of combining more into less. ; )

On the page I'm on right now he uses barreltone , and unlike other seemingly made up ones, he explains where that comes from. It's funny.

I'm actually starting to get attached to his quirky language.


message 38: by Patrick (new)

Patrick The concept of portmanteau words owes a lot to Lewis Carroll, who wrote explicitly about his use of them in the poem Jabberwocky.


message 39: by Sue (new)

Sue K H (sky_bluez) | 3183 comments Mark wrote: "Obtrusive is a pretty strong word. I don't think the author was intending introducing any of his combined words into general usage. I apologize for using the title portmanteau - I've seen it used i..."

No bad! It was very interesting. As I'm getting more used to them, they don't seem as obtrusive, but they definitely were in the beginning for me.


message 40: by Sue (new)

Sue K H (sky_bluez) | 3183 comments Patrick wrote: "The concept of portmanteau words owes a lot to Lewis Carroll, who wrote explicitly about his use of them in the poem Jabberwocky."

I put that on my library list. Thanks!


message 41: by Patrick (new)

Patrick Sue wrote: "Patrick wrote: "The concept of portmanteau words owes a lot to Lewis Carroll, who wrote explicitly about his use of them in the poem Jabberwocky."

I put that on my library list. Thanks!"


The poem itself is in Through the Looking-Glass; Carroll's explanation of the portmanteau technique is in his preface to the book-length poem The Hunting of the Snark. Whether Carroll was a direct influence on Joyce is debated.


message 42: by Leni (new)

Leni Iversen (leniverse) | 1220 comments Dressinggown isn't strictly speaking a portmanteau word as it doesn't combine two meanings into one. It's a compound noun, the way they are made in Germanic languages where "dressing gown" would mean dressing a gown, and "dressinggown" would be the actual garment. (Dividing compound nouns into their separate compounds in a Germanic language is often referred to as the "English disease", along with Polio and stray apostrophes.) Normally a double consonant would be reduced by the introduction of another consonant, but in compound words double consonants remain double.

In Welsh you also frequently compound not just nouns, but any part of speech, into a single word, and they seem inordinately fond of their consonants (but I admit my grasp of Welsh is weak). I imagine Gaelic Irish would be similar. That said, I have no idea if the Irish equivalent of "dressing gown" would be one such word.


message 43: by Leni (new)

Leni Iversen (leniverse) | 1220 comments Mark wrote: "I was trying to be helpful. Obviously now, my veracity as an Ulysses authority has been severely compromised. I apologize for my mistakes. I did intend to lead any one astray."

Nah, you're still our resident Ulysses authority. And very helpful. Keep 'em coming.


message 44: by Katy, New School Classics (new)

Katy (kathy_h) | 9439 comments Mod
Looks like I'd better get reading!


message 45: by J_BlueFlower (new)

J_BlueFlower (j_from_denmark) | 1510 comments Leni wrote: "...It's a compound noun, the way they are made in Germanic languages where "dressing gown" would me..."

Danish grammar is very similar to German in that respect.

“halvnøgen kvinde” (half-naked women) means a women who is halfway naked, but
”halv nøgen kvinde” means half of a naked women.

So an extra space can matter a lot.

Word-fun.... I am very much looking forward to start reading.


message 46: by James (new)

James (pepecamello) | 41 comments Why is it not "halv nøgenkvinde" in the second example?


message 47: by siriusedward (last edited Jan 02, 2018 10:39AM) (new)

siriusedward (elenaraphael) | 2052 comments Very interesting. .all these words


message 48: by Leni (new)

Leni Iversen (leniverse) | 1220 comments J_BlueFlower wrote: "Leni wrote: "...It's a compound noun, the way they are made in Germanic languages where "dressing gown" would me..."

Danish grammar is very similar to German in that respect.

“halvnøgen kvinde” ..."


Yes, Germanic, not German, so that encompasses Scandinavian languages too. :)


message 49: by Leni (last edited Jan 05, 2018 07:47AM) (new)

Leni Iversen (leniverse) | 1220 comments James wrote: "Why is it not "halv nøgenkvinde" in the second example?"

Because here we have two adjectives and a noun, not two nouns or an adjective plus noun. So it's the two adjectives being combined. :)


message 50: by Sara, Old School Classics (last edited Jan 02, 2018 01:15PM) (new)

Sara (phantomswife) | 5048 comments Mod
My head is spinning, but I am enjoying all this word banter. I took an etymology class when I was in college and it was one of my favorite classes EVER. The guy who taught it was British and he already thought we Americans were slaughtering "his" language. By the time the course was over, I agreed.


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