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General Conversation > Quotes ~~ 2018

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message 1: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18878 comments

Please share your favorite quotes with us. :)

Maybe you have a favorite from a book you are currently reading or read in the past? Please share it with us.

Perhaps you have come across a quote that is inspirational. If so share it with the group. :)


message 2: by Alias Reader (last edited Dec 30, 2017 02:14PM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18878 comments


message 3: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18878 comments


message 4: by Alias Reader (last edited Dec 30, 2017 08:15PM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18878 comments


message 5: by madrano (new)

madrano | 11674 comments Love the chalk message.

The quote directly above is perfect for January 1.


message 6: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18878 comments


message 7: by Julie (new)

Julie (julielill) | 2381 comments Alias Reader wrote: ""

I do love to swing!!


message 8: by Alias Reader (last edited Jan 01, 2018 07:02PM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18878 comments Julie wrote: "Alias Reader wrote: ""

I do love to swing!!"


I recently took my nieces 4 year son to the park with my sister. I did the swings, slides and monkey bars with him. :)


message 9: by madrano (new)

madrano | 11674 comments Neat! I like swinging, too. The thrill is the same after all these decades. Good picture, i must say.


message 10: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18878 comments History will have to record that the greatest tragedy of this period of social transition was not the strident clamor of the bad people, but the appalling silence of the good people.

~~~Martin Luther King, Jr.


message 11: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18878 comments


message 12: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18878 comments


message 13: by madrano (new)

madrano | 11674 comments Two superb King quotes, Alias. It sounds louder today than at the time...or maybe it's just my own age. Thanks.


message 14: by Alias Reader (last edited Jan 16, 2018 03:00PM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18878 comments madrano wrote: "Two superb King quotes, Alias. It sounds louder today than at the time...or maybe it's just my own age. Thanks."

Nope, not your age. :) I selected these purposefully because of current times.


message 15: by madrano (new)

madrano | 11674 comments Indeed. Reading some of King's quotes this week reminded me of how far we are from then in technological advances but close to not much change back then. I don't really think that is true because many, many more are willing to call out hatred than back then.


message 16: by Dru83 (new)

Dru83 | 222 comments I've been reading the Shattered Sea trilogy by Joe Abercrombie and have found many interesting quotes within the first two books, Half a King and Half the World:

“The fool strikes. The wise man smiles, and watches, and learns. Then strikes.”

“Pick your enemies more carefully then your friends, they will be with you longer.”

“The wise wait for their moment, but never let it pass.”

“If life has taught me one thing, it's that there are no villains. Only people, doing their best.”

“The wise speaker first learns when to stay silent”

“It is so often the small things overlooked which leave our schemes in ruins.”

“... Never worry about what has been done. Only about what will be.”

“But enemies, as his mother used to say, are the price of success.”

“It is my sad observation that some men always want more.”

“They say the seed you scatter will be the seed you harvest,”

“Those with bad luck should at least attempt to balance it with good sense.”

“Fools boast of what they will do. Heroes do it.”

“I always thought of being together as the end of the work. Turns out it's where the work starts.”

“You want a thing when you can't have it. When you get it you suddenly sprout doubts. Then when you think you might lose it you find you need it worse than ever.”

“The trouble with being able to lift heavy things is that when heavy things need lifting folk step out of the way and smile at you.”

“Where do we find allies?"
Father Yarvi smiled. "Among our enemies, where else?”

“...the more you learn the more you understand the size of your own ignorance.”

“Pain is the best schoolmaster, as you will soon discover.”

“You keep an oath not for the oath but for yourself”


message 17: by Alias Reader (last edited Jan 20, 2018 07:42PM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18878 comments Dru83 wrote: "I've been reading the Shattered Sea trilogy by Joe Abercrombie and have found many interesting quotes within the first two books, Half a King and Half the World:.."

Wow ! Love these. Thanks for sharing.

This quote that you shared “If life has taught me one thing, it's that there are no villains. Only people, doing their best.”

Reminded me of one from the classic novel A Tree Grows in Brooklyn -Betty Smith
The father tells his daughter, "“There are very few bad people. There are just a lot of people that are unlucky.”


message 18: by Madrano (new)

Madrano (madran) | 3732 comments Oddly enough, that was the one quote from the trilogy list which rang false to me and i know it wouldn't have before last year.

I still fully agree (and like) the quote from Smith's book, though.


message 19: by Alias Reader (last edited Jan 22, 2018 03:06PM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18878 comments RE:Reminded me of one from the classic novel A Tree Grows in Brooklyn -Betty Smith
The father tells his daughter, "“There are very few bad people. There are just a lot of people that are unlucky.”
---------------

Deb, I look at the quote referencing people who may be poor or not have the advantage of a good education etc. Some look upon people like that as having a character flaw. They may think they are lazy . Instead of realizing that life sometimes throws you a curve. So maybe you weren't fortunate to have someone to guide and encourage you in school. Perhaps you don't have the right networking connections to get that high paying job. Maybe your home life was horrible etc. All manner of things that are out of ones control can come into play. We are not all dealt a winning hand in life.

I don't take the quote to include criminals, liars, etc. Though even some "criminals" may have reasons. One book reference to be considered may be Les Misérables

Though I can see how the quote may be viewed otherwise.


message 20: by Dru83 (new)

Dru83 | 222 comments I kind of agree with you Madrano, that that quote doesn't quite ring true all the time, but in many cases it does. Sure, with someone who is pure evil, yeah, they're a villain. Some things are not forgivable. But in many cases, the people we think are bad are just doing the best they can even if their best brings them to cross purposes with our best. Might not be the best quote, but it's thought provoking at least.

I'm now working my way through the third book, Half a War. I just read a similar line, "Every hero is someone's villain". It just goes to support this idea that people are multi-faceted to the point where it's often hard to tell who is "good" and who is "bad".


message 21: by Madrano (new)

Madrano (madran) | 3732 comments Dru, that last quote is so true it's almost painful. I certainly agree with you about telling the difference between good & bad. This is an area where i think readers benefit more than non-readers. We are presented with opportunities to look into the lives of "bad" characters to understand their depths.

Alias, i like your explanation. This is something i feel i often do well, much to my husband's chagrin--look into a "bad" action/person to see where the feelings arose. Certainly it's usually more than one thing (i.e., Hitler's art being rejected didn't lead him to become a Nazi, which was something i heard in my 20s) but learning what it is that contributed is instructive. And the other way, looking a "good" action/people and exploring their circumstances.

Dru, you mentioned the quotes as thought provoking and i think we've well illustrated this, eh? Thanks again.


message 22: by Alias Reader (last edited Jan 23, 2018 11:20AM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18878 comments Madrano wrote: "Dru, that last quote is so true it's almost painful. I certainly agree with you about telling the difference between good & bad. This is an area where i think readers benefit more than non-readers...."

Deb, this is a topic that I find fascinating.

When I read
The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America--Erik Larson
with a book club that I belonged to I objected to the title.

I felt that people who engage in criminal behavior or do horrendously violent things have some sort of mental / brain problem or such tendencies that are set off by environment. Hopefully, they may be able to be medically treated. This is not to say they don't need to be removed from society until they are well or stay removed from society if they can't be helped.

I think I was the only one that saw it this way. They felt people were good or bad period. They absolutely didn't want to view it as as brain disease as one would with other diseases of the body. They didn't care about any environmental issues that may have induced the behavior.

The book led me to read a bunch of books on psychopaths. Not that all people who are violent or commit crimes are psychopaths. It's just one area of psychology that fascinated me.

Also some felt that looking at it as a disease of the brain is giving the person an excuse. I don't see it that way at all.

I don't think it is an excuse to say if someone had a predisposition towards violence or crime and they had a horrendous childhood that one might not find use in examining that. Of course there are many that suffer great child abuse and don't go on to exhibit violent or criminal behavior. Perhaps they did not have a genetic predisposition for it. Just like someone can eat bacon, never exercised and smoke 3 packs of cigarettes a day and live to 100. That doesn't mean we shouldn't examine the effects of smoking , poor diet and lack of exercise.

Deb, you mention the Unabomber. He was literally a genius. He sort out medical help and didn't get it for a variety of reasons. I feel this needs to be examined so we can prevent it happening again. Saying he is "evil" and that's it, doesn't advance the process of how we prevent this from happening again.

You noted, "Hitler's art being rejected didn't lead him to become a Nazi, which was something i heard in my 20s" But perhaps his very abusive childhood or the racist environment he lived in contributed in some manner. Does it excuse it? Of course not. But I do think it's important part of the story to examine it.

I felt the same with In Cold Blood. How much did Perry Smith's abusive upbringing contribute to his psychopathy ?

I think John Hinkley is one example. He was given parole after doctors testified that he was no longer a danger.

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2016/...

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/is-it-ti...

On the other hand, sometimes we don't see any environmental link. Perhaps people would become violent etc. in the most loving upbringing. And it's a brain disorder. It does seem, from the little I've read, that some are born this way and exhibit violent behavior at a very young age. Torturing animals is one trait in psychopaths.

My point is, labeling people "devil" "evil" etc. I don't think helps us to understand why people behave in a certain way. It also doesn't help prevent the next person who may commit such acts.

Then there is the discussion on how we treat prisoners. Take Norway for example. This article is very interesting.
https://www.theguardian.com/society/2...

Okay...off my soapbox. LOL


message 23: by Julie (new)

Julie (julielill) | 2381 comments Alias Reader wrote: "Madrano wrote: "Dru, that last quote is so true it's almost painful. I certainly agree with you about telling the difference between good & bad. This is an area where i think readers benefit more t..."

The article on Norway prisons was very interesting.


message 24: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18878 comments Julie, I forget what the case was here in the U.S. but it came out that in countries like Norway, the person wouldn't spend much time in jail. The sentences there are very short, even for major crimes.

I think it was Norway. ;)


message 25: by Madrano (new)

Madrano (madran) | 3732 comments Alias, i tend to agree with you about "good/bad" people. There is something underneath it all which we tend to ignore. Time and again we learn about heinous acts, which catch the headlines, but only much, much later (usually in articles & books written about the acts/tragedies) do we learn about the events in the life of the perpetrator which might have created such a human. Abuse as a child is often the culprit. As you noted, there are plenty of people who survive such abuse and never commit crimes, so other factors contributed.

I remember that you read a number of books about psychopaths but didn't realize that derived from reading Devil in White City, which was a good book imo. Sometimes i think that readers of such books are so engrossed in the victims and their experiences that it's easy to call the person "bad" and be done with it. This is easier to do in a group, i think, which may explain why your reading group saw it that way.

But not necessarily. It just takes patience to wait and learn the whys of a killer when the vulnerable victim is available for sympathy. It's good if we can feel for both. And, of course, try to identify others before their mental illness drives them to that extreme.

Don't get me wrong, i will still label someone "evil incarnate"(which i probably shouldn't do) but i only mean it as an expression of how the victim must have seen her/him at that moment. I was thinking there wasn't much known about the "Devil", H.H. Holmes but see i was wrong. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H._H._H... Still, there is nothing which indicates what might have pushed him over that edge.


message 26: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18878 comments The Reason Why I Give Compliments To Strangers

Posted by Positive Outlooks

People wonder why I give so many compliments out to strangers. I’m not being fake and I’m not looking for people to like me. But if I pass someone and I like something, I say it. “Love those shoes!” or “Great hair!” or “Wow your eyes are beautiful!”….why? Because life is hard and this world can be a shitty place, and people are mean. You never know how much those few words mean to someone, you never know what hell they may be going through; and when you put positivity out there into the universe YOU yourself become a happier person. It’s hard to be nice and be miserable yourself. It’ll reflect from the outside in. I’m telling you random compliment giving will change your life; and maybe someone else’s, too.
— Jordan Sarah Weatherhead


message 27: by Julie (new)

Julie (julielill) | 2381 comments Alias Reader wrote: "The Reason Why I Give Compliments To Strangers

Posted by Positive Outlooks

People wonder why I give so many compliments out to strangers. I’m not being fake and I’m not looking for people to like..."


I love that advice.


message 28: by Leanne (new)

Leanne Beadle | 2 comments I started to put quotes that I found inspirational on my Author Page every Sunday. My favourite quote is "Writing is it's own reward" by Henry Miller.


message 29: by Madrano (new)

Madrano (madran) | 3732 comments Good quote, Leanne. I've not heard that one previously but like it.

Alias, i like that quote, too. It rings true. When a stranger compliments me, it stays with me. This is probably because we realize they didn't have to say something nice but did so.


message 30: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18878 comments


message 31: by Madrano (new)

Madrano (madran) | 3732 comments Nice one.


message 32: by Julie (new)

Julie (julielill) | 2381 comments Alias Reader wrote: ""

That is true!


message 33: by Dru83 (new)

Dru83 | 222 comments That one goes with the old story of the woman who was throwing sea stars that had washed up on the beach back into the sea. A man comes along and looks at the thousands of sea stars washed up on the beach and says, "well, you won't make much of a difference since you'll never be able to throw them all back." The woman throws one more into the sea, then turns and says, "I made a difference to that one!"


message 34: by Dru83 (new)

Dru83 | 222 comments I just finished reading the fantasy novel A Torch Against the Night by Sabaa Tahir and came upon an interesting quote.

"Failure doesn't define you. It's what you do after you fail that determines whether you are a leader or a waste of perfectly good air."


message 35: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18878 comments Dru83 wrote: "That one goes with the old story of the woman who was throwing sea stars that had washed up on the beach back into the sea. A man comes along and looks at the thousands of sea stars washed up on th..."

Nice one !


message 36: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18878 comments Dru83 wrote: "Failure doesn't define you. It's what you do after you fail that determines whether you are a leader or a waste of perfectly good air." ."

Yes !


message 37: by Madrano (new)

Madrano (madran) | 3732 comments Neat story about the sea stars, Dru.

And very good quote about what one does with failure. Thanks for both.


message 38: by Shelby (new)

Shelby | 4 comments “Two gorgeous guys slaving in the kitchen. Doesn't get any better than this.'
'You have low standards,' Chait grinned over his shoulder and dropped bread into the toaster. 'If I had two hot girls in my kitchen, I'd want them naked.'
I stood immobile, seeing Chait and Hayden in my minds eye. Naked, cooking for me.
Hayden glanced my way and chuckled as I dashed away.”
― Veronica Blade, Something Witchy This Way Comes

“Why are you such an ass?" The words came out before I could think twice.
"Everyone has to excel at something, right?"
"Well, you're doing a great job.”
― Jennifer L. Armentrout, Obsidian


message 39: by Alias Reader (last edited Feb 11, 2018 06:50PM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18878 comments


message 40: by Madrano (new)

Madrano (madran) | 3732 comments LOL, Shelby. Two funny ones.

Alias, sound advice.


message 41: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18878 comments Armchair Travel


---The Epic City: The World on the Streets of Calcutta
by Kushanava Choudhury

What it's about: After graduating from Princeton, Kushanava Choudhury left his immigrant parents in New Jersey and returned to Calcutta, India, where'd he spent a portion of his youth, to work at the Statesman newspaper and explore the teeming, complex city.

For fans of: Eloquently combining travelogue, memoir, and history, The Epic City will be appreciated by fans of Suketu Mehta's Maximum City: Bombay Lost and Found.



---Following Fifi: My Adventures Among Wild Chimpanzees
by John Crocker; foreword by Jane Goodall

Featuring: fascinating wild chimpanzees; primatologist Jane Goodall (who's justifiably famous for studying them in Gombe forest in Tanzania); and author John Crocker (who, as a premed student, spent eight months working with Goodall, observing mother chimpanzees).

What it's about: Not only does Crocker describe his 1973 visit, but also a return trip with his teenage son years later. Crocker also explains how his field work helped make him a better father and physician.

Look for: Those interested in Goodall will be interested in the recent National Geographic documentary, Jane.



--Cuba on the Verge: 12 Writers on Continuity and Change in Havana and Across...
by Leila Guerriero, editor

What it is: an anthology of eye-opening essays written by 12 authors -- some native Cubans, some visitors -- and edited by Leila Guerriero, an Argentinian journalist. The book offers a wide-ranging look at modern Cuba, covering baseball, movies, sex tourism, immigration, sexism, and more.

Further reading: Pick up another thought-provoking recent book about Cuba, Mark Kurlansky's Havana.



-- The Abu Dhabi Bar Mitzvah: Fear and Love in the Modern Middle East
by Adam Valen Levinson

What it's about: Hoping to address his post-9/11 fears, a Jewish American man armed with college Arabic skills took a job in Abu Dhabi and visited over 20 Middle-Eastern countries, including Iraq, Iran, and Egypt.

Who it's for: those who appreciate curious, funny, introspective travelers.

Further reading: Want another amusing, Arabic-centric travelogue? Try Zora O'Neill's All Strangers Are Kin.
Made into Movies



---A Walk in the Woods: Rediscovering America on the Appalachian Trail
by Bill Bryson

What it's about: American travel writer Bill Bryson, who'd been living in England for years, set out to hike the Appalachian Trail with an old friend. The two out-of-shape 40-somethings thought they'd walk the entire 2,100 miles to Maine before winter -- but reality soon hit. Nature descriptions and a history of the storied trail combine with the pair's amusing experiences and their encounters with other hikers.

The movie: In 2015, Robert Redford and Nick Nolte dramatized the duo's nature adventure on the big screen.



---Out of Africa
by Isak Dinesen

What it's about: When Kenya was known as British East Africa, Dane Karen Blixen (whose pseudonym was Isak Dinesen) lived and worked on a family coffee plantation located at the foot of the Ngong Hills. Her classic memoir lyrically captures her time there from 1913-1931, describing the alluring landscape, the local people, the deaths of close friends, and the eventual failure of the farm.

The movie: The award-winning 1985 film adaptation of Out of Africa, which also drew from other Dinesen writings, focused on Blixen's romance with a British aristocrat and starred Meryl Streep and Robert Redford.



----Into the Wild
by Jon Krakauer

What it's about: Bestselling author Jon Krakauer pieces together the dramatic -- and tragic -- story of Chris McCandless, an intelligent young man who embarked on a solo journey into the wilds of Alaska with no map and virtually no supplies.

The movie: Originally published in 1996, Into the Wild was adapted as a film in 2007 by Sean Penn and starred Emile Hirsch; Chris' sister, Carine McCandless, consulted on the movie and later wrote a book, The Wild Truth, about her and her brother's abusive childhood.



----Under the Tuscan Sun: At Home in Italy
by Frances Mayes

What it's about: First published in 1986, this delightful book chronicles poet Frances Mayes' purchase of a Tuscan villa in need of refurbishing. Relating experiences from her new Italian life, Mayes describes spending time with her neighbors, dealing with repairs, and dining on delicious foods (recipes are included!).

The movie: The 2003 Under the Tuscan Sun movie is quite different from the book but features luminous scenery and a compelling Diane Lane as Mayes.


message 42: by Madrano (new)

Madrano (madran) | 3732 comments Some oldies but goodies in there, plus a few made into movies. Neat.


message 43: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18878 comments


message 44: by madrano (new)

madrano | 11674 comments Yes! As true today as ever.


message 45: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18878 comments


message 46: by madrano (new)

madrano | 11674 comments Yes! And for so many things, it's not too late!


message 47: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18878 comments


message 48: by madrano (new)

madrano | 11674 comments Hmmm...My first thought was you could catch a current. But, then again, i've never canoed.


message 49: by madrano (last edited Mar 10, 2018 02:26PM) (new)

madrano | 11674 comments While reading 50 Women Artists You Should Know by Christiane Weidemann, one of my DLs, i'm pleased to say, i found this.

"You will not be granted liberty. You must grasp it for yourself."
Méret Oppenheim, sculptor

Wanted to share...


message 50: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18878 comments madrano wrote: ""You will not be granted liberty. You must grasp it for yourself."
Méret Oppenheim, sculptor"


Quite true.


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