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General Conversation > General Discussion Salon ~~ 2018

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message 1: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 17156 comments


message 2: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 17156 comments


message 3: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 17156 comments


message 4: by madrano (new)

madrano | 9742 comments Feeling old...i graduated high school in '68. I hope this evening is lovely for everyone here. I'll be with my siblings and husband.


message 5: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 17156 comments

Charlie Brown and Van Gogh. Love it !

If anyone is interested in meditation, there is a free app that I love.
It has over 7000 meditations. I highly recommend it.

Insight Timer


message 6: by madrano (new)

madrano | 9742 comments That is now my favorite Charlie Brown cartoon.


message 7: by Julie (new)

Julie (julielill) | 2215 comments Alias Reader wrote: "

Charlie Brown and Van Gogh. Love it !

If anyone is interested in meditation, there is a free app that I love.
It has over 7000 meditations. I highly recommend it.

Insight Timer"


I love it.


message 8: by Bobbie (new)

Bobbie (bobbie572002) | 1084 comments madrano wrote: "Feeling old...i graduated high school in '68. I hope this evening is lovely for everyone here. I'll be with my siblings and husband."

I graduated high school in 1953. You're just a kid. LOL Happy New Year.


message 9: by Julie (new)

Julie (readerjules) | 1208 comments Thanks for making me feel young guys! :-) I was feeling old when I realized my coworker friend could be my daughter....lol
(I'm 45)


message 10: by madrano (new)

madrano | 9742 comments LOL--i like that we cover the age gamut so nicely. I still become disconcerted when i realize i'm talking with someone the age of one of my kids. I suppose that means that mentally i'm still seeing my children as youngsters.

Happy New Year to all of us, old & mildly used.


message 11: by Julie (last edited Jan 05, 2018 12:07PM) (new)

Julie (readerjules) | 1208 comments madrano wrote: "I suppose that means that mentally i'm still seeing my children as youngsters...."

I don't think that is surprising.

I don't have any children, so when I realize that I'm old enough to have a child who is an adult, it's kind of weird. I normally don't think about that.


message 12: by madrano (new)

madrano | 9742 comments I can see why, Julie. I remember being amazed when i learned a woman i had known for several months had two daughters in their 30s. I was stunned. Now, i have one in her 40s & i laugh at that other me. Time...


message 13: by Alias Reader (last edited Jan 14, 2018 12:58PM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 17156 comments


Martin Luther King - I Have A Dream Speech - August 28, 1963
YouTube
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=smEqn...



I have a Dream by Martin Luther King, Jr; August 28, 1963

Delivered on the steps at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C. on August 28, 1963

Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of captivity.

But one hundred years later, we must face the tragic fact that the Negro is still not free. One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination. One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity. One hundred years later, the Negro is still languishing in the corners of American society and finds himself an exile in his own land. So we have come here today to dramatize an appalling condition.

In a sense we have come to our nation's capital to cash a check. When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir. This note was a promise that all men would be guaranteed the inalienable rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

It is obvious today that America has defaulted on this promissory note insofar as her citizens of color are concerned. Instead of honoring this sacred obligation, America has given the Negro people a bad check which has come back marked "insufficient funds." But we refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt. We refuse to believe that there are insufficient funds in the great vaults of opportunity of this nation. So we have come to cash this check -- a check that will give us upon demand the riches of freedom and the security of justice. We have also come to this hallowed spot to remind America of the fierce urgency of now. This is no time to engage in the luxury of cooling off or to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. Now is the time to rise from the dark and desolate valley of segregation to the sunlit path of racial justice. Now is the time to open the doors of opportunity to all of God's children. Now is the time to lift our nation from the quicksands of racial injustice to the solid rock of brotherhood.

It would be fatal for the nation to overlook the urgency of the moment and to underestimate the determination of the Negro. This sweltering summer of the Negro's legitimate discontent will not pass until there is an invigorating autumn of freedom and equality. Nineteen sixty-three is not an end, but a beginning. Those who hope that the Negro needed to blow off steam and will now be content will have a rude awakening if the nation returns to business as usual. There will be neither rest nor tranquility in America until the Negro is granted his citizenship rights. The whirlwinds of revolt will continue to shake the foundations of our nation until the bright day of justice emerges.

But there is something that I must say to my people who stand on the warm threshold which leads into the palace of justice. In the process of gaining our rightful place we must not be guilty of wrongful deeds. Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred.

We must forever conduct our struggle on the high plane of dignity and discipline. We must not allow our creative protest to degenerate into physical violence. Again and again we must rise to the majestic heights of meeting physical force with soul force. The marvelous new militancy which has engulfed the Negro community must not lead us to distrust of all white people, for many of our white brothers, as evidenced by their presence here today, have come to realize that their destiny is tied up with our destiny and their freedom is inextricably bound to our freedom. We cannot walk alone.

And as we walk, we must make the pledge that we shall march ahead. We cannot turn back. There are those who are asking the devotees of civil rights, "When will you be satisfied?" We can never be satisfied as long as our bodies, heavy with the fatigue of travel, cannot gain lodging in the motels of the highways and the hotels of the cities. We cannot be satisfied as long as the Negro's basic mobility is from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. We can never be satisfied as long as a Negro in Mississippi cannot vote and a Negro in New York believes he has nothing for which to vote. No, no, we are not satisfied, and we will not be satisfied until justice rolls down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream.

I am not unmindful that some of you have come here out of great trials and tribulations. Some of you have come fresh from narrow cells. Some of you have come from areas where your quest for freedom left you battered by the storms of persecution and staggered by the winds of police brutality. You have been the veterans of creative suffering. Continue to work with the faith that unearned suffering is redemptive.

Go back to Mississippi, go back to Alabama, go back to Georgia, go back to Louisiana, go back to the slums and ghettos of our northern cities, knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed. Let us not wallow in the valley of despair.

I say to you today, my friends, that in spite of the difficulties and frustrations of the moment, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream.

I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: "We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal."

I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slaveowners will be able to sit down together at a table of brotherhood.

I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a desert state, sweltering with the heat of injustice and oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice.

I have a dream that my four children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.

I have a dream today.

I have a dream that one day the state of Alabama, whose governor's lips are presently dripping with the words of interposition and nullification, will be transformed into a situation where little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls and walk together as sisters and brothers.

I have a dream today.

I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight, and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed, and all flesh shall see it together.

This is our hope. This is the faith with which I return to the South. With this faith we will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope. With this faith we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. With this faith we will be able to work together, to pray together, to struggle together, to go to jail together, to stand up for freedom together, knowing that we will be free one day.

This will be the day when all of God's children will be able to sing with a new meaning, "My country, 'tis of thee, sweet land of liberty, of thee I sing. Land where my fathers died, land of the pilgrim's pride, from every mountainside, let freedom ring."

And if America is to be a great nation this must become true. So let freedom ring from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire. Let freedom ring from the mighty mountains of New York. Let freedom ring from the heightening Alleghenies of Pennsylvania!

Let freedom ring from the snowcapped Rockies of Colorado!

Let freedom ring from the curvaceous peaks of California!

But not only that; let freedom ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia!

Let freedom ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee!

Let freedom ring from every hill and every molehill of Mississippi. From every mountainside, let freedom ring.

When we let freedom ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God's children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual, "Free at last! free at last! Thank God Almighty, we are free at last!"


message 14: by madrano (new)

madrano | 9742 comments Thank you for the beautiful reminder of the glorious words from this speech. I hope everyone here has a thoughtful Martin Luther King, Jr. Day!


message 15: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 17156 comments From Dr. Dean Ornish news letter

You should be dancing, yeah.
What you doin’ on your back, aah?
You should be dancing, yeah

For the record, I was only a toddler when this Bee Gee favorite hit #1 for a couple of months in 1976, and I’ve never been much of a dancer. But as an exercise physiologist , I can confirm that when it comes to good exercise for your heart and mind, the Bee Gees said it best.

People who dance frequently have a 75 percent lower chance of dementia

In fact, in a decade-long study of nearly 48,400 people over the age of 40, Australian researchers concluded that regularly dancing at “moderate intensity” cut your chances of dying of cardiovascular disease by 46 percent. The study, published in June, 2016 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, concluded that dancing beat fast-walking, which cut those chances by 33 percent.

Here are three other reasons why dancing is great exercise.

1.Dancing Is Interval Training
You don’t have to use a machine or run on a track to get a workout. You’re working out if you engage different muscle groups and become slightly out of breath and a bit sweaty. So keep up with a rock and roll, swing, or fiddle beat, or a Viennese waltz, and you’ll be moving fast, often in repeated short bursts that will feel just like an interval workout.

2. Dancing is Brain Food
To ward off dementia you might guess that reading and doing crossword puzzles would be most effective. But in a landmark New England Journal of Medicine study of nearly 500 people recruited between the ages of 75 and 85, dancing emerged as the best choice. People who danced frequently had a 75 percent lower chance of dementia, compared to people who didn’t participate in any of the leisure time activities studied. Filling in crossword puzzles (at least four days a week) cut your chances by 47 percent and reading 35 percent.

Why would dancing beat seemingly more brainy activities? Richard Powers, a dance instructor at Stanford University observes that the seniors in this study were probably doing foxtrot, waltz, swing, and maybe some rumba and cha cha. He points out that this kind of freestyle dancing “requires a lot of split-second decision-making,” both for men and women. You’re moving and thinking—on your feet, so to speak.

To stay ever-young, I recommend swing. Check out this video of finalists in a swing competition. How cool is that?

Remember, there’s no reason you can’t do puzzles and dance, though probably not at the same time.

3. Dancing Creates Social Connection
Connect with a regular partner or with a group of people you know —you’ll be relieving stress while bonding. At Ornish Lifestyle Medicine, we’ve learned that giving and receiving love and support is essential for good health. If you don’t have a partner or group to go out with, take a class. Powers says dance classes help you to learn something new and give you tools to be creative on the floor.
Many gyms now offer classes in Nia, which combines dance and martial arts to give you an hour or so of cardio, muscle-building, and balance practice. Zumba classes mix it up to Latin and World rhythms. Following the teacher’s moves will challenge your concentration and coordination, though freestyle might be better brain food.

https://www.ornish.com


message 16: by madrano (new)

madrano | 9742 comments As one with zero sense of rhythm, over the years i've enjoyed watching dancers. And i dance when no one is around to see me, leading me to see the benefits. I like what the article shares.

My 91 year old mother-in-law has had a lifelong affair with dancing, well into her years in the retirement center. Now she only line dances but is no longer the leader as that position became too much for her memory. Still, she attends the classes and shows up for events they hold. Yes, they perform for others...well, for those in the less mobile side of the residences.

One thing i've noticed, which will probably change as the next generation moves in (already several couples in their 70s have arrived), is that while there is a weekly music/dance afternoon, few dance. Of course the line dancers are up & at 'em when the music is appropriate but overall few dance. Why? The women won't ask the men to dance and the men are too embarrassed by their abilities. It's a pity. We've suggested to the staff that someone stay to encourage them but their stance is that this is an opportunity for the residents to have fun without them supervising. It's true, at least according to my MIL, that they appreciate that "freedom" from the staff. As i wrote, the next generation may change that.


message 17: by Alias Reader (last edited Jan 15, 2018 03:53PM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 17156 comments Deb, I can tell you that dance is VERY popular at my Y.
There are people from 20- to around 75 in all the classes.

(ballet, jazz, retro dance, zumba, hip hop)

By the way, they did have a line dance class for a short period of time. I took it and it was a lot of fun. And it may look super simply but I can attest to it's difficulty. We would learn 3 or 4 different line dances each class.

Some Y's also have belly dance which is also popular.


message 18: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 17156 comments For those that are interested in the Women's Marches Jan. 20-21 here is a good site for information for your area. You can follow them on Facebook, too. If all you can do is share on fb that is helpful, too.

WeAreMarchOn.org

Also
https://www.indivisible.org/


message 19: by madrano (new)

madrano | 9742 comments Alias, i didn't mean to dis line dance, although i can see why it would seem i was. I'm not a fan of it but i can see that folks are enjoying it. Also, for some it is a workout, too. I think this is one reason it works for older people, it can be as rigorous as needed.

Thanks for the link to the March. Last month i heard there was going to be another but had a tough time finding out info. Initially all i found here was another in Austin, which was fine but we really didn't want to go there. Now i know there is one here in Dallas, as well as a number of the blossomed suburbs around the city. I suspect there will be more marches but with fewer people per march.


message 20: by Akida (new)

Akida J (akidaja) Hi all! I have about 60 books to give away that I'm hoping can go to a community project / social club / charity that supports the more vulnerable in our society - e.g. young people, the disabled, the elderly etc.

It could be a place where volunteers need books to read to the patrons e.g. befrienders / vision impaired, or a solution to the users of the service not otherwise having access to books of their own.

Any ideas for this, ideally in London?

Thanks!


message 21: by Petra (last edited Jan 22, 2018 05:59PM) (new)

Petra | 980 comments Akida, that's lovely! Hugs for giving such a big-hearted enjoyment to so many!

I live in Canada, so some of these options may not apply:
- phone the Blind Association and ask them if they have a reading program. Sometimes the Association will tape the book (if they find a narrator) or translate it into Braille (or do both).
- hospitals have volunteers take carts of donated books to all the rooms and allow patients to choose books. They can later exchange the book for another (or take it home).
- Women's Shelters
- Homeless Shelters
- Youth Shelters
- Homes for the Aged

You've got such a big heart! Hugs to you.


message 22: by Madrano (new)

Madrano (madran) | 3732 comments Because i generally give mine to our library's annual sale, i haven't researched this much. I want to echo Petra's idea, however, that senior citizens centers and retirement homes have poor selections here in Texas. Of course i suppose the flip side of this is the size of the print. Too small a font & the book will just gather dust.


message 23: by Akida (new)

Akida J (akidaja) Thanks so much for your suggestions, Petra and Madrano! I’ll look into their UK alternatives :)


message 24: by Dem (new)


message 25: by Madrano (new)

Madrano (madran) | 3732 comments I pace myself with thrillers because i don't like the swift way i read them. But who can control that once begun?


message 26: by Alias Reader (last edited Feb 11, 2018 01:30PM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 17156 comments February 11 begins the Random Acts of Kindness week !





Whether you have five seconds or five hours, show someone you care this week. A smile, a compliment etc.

Here is a list of 50
https://www.yourtango.com/2018310490/...


message 27: by Madrano (new)

Madrano (madran) | 3732 comments There's a week for this? Interesting--i like it. Of course one wonders why it falls in the same week as Mardi Gras and the beginning of the Lunar New Year. Are we more likely to help out then--New Years resolutions? Drunken kindness? ;-)


message 28: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 17156 comments It's also Ash Wednesday and Valentines day.

I would think it's the same time every year.

Of course one should do random acts of kindness all the time, but I think this is a good idea to refocus.

When I was looking for a image to post for this, I noted there were a lot of images for kids. So it must be something they focus on in some schools. I think that's awesome.

Here are some that I saw.





message 29: by Madrano (new)

Madrano (madran) | 3732 comments Oh, that is neat. I agree, it's setting the stage for a healthier life for those children. Oddly enough i see "Cut out a funny comic and post it for others to see." Today i was rereading a letter from a friend who did exactly that--three political comics. Good idea, as i wouldn't have seen them otherwise.


message 30: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 17156 comments


message 31: by Madrano (new)

Madrano (madran) | 3732 comments Good graphic for PBS, Alias.


message 32: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 17156 comments Madrano wrote: "Good graphic for PBS, Alias."

My local PBS posted it on FB after the Trump administration's budget cut all funding for PBS and the Endowments for the arts.

I am just sick over all the cuts. November elections can't come soon enough for me.


message 33: by Petra (new)

Petra | 980 comments Alias Reader wrote: "I am just sick over all the cuts. November elections can't come soon enough for me. ..."

Who is running against him? He may win by default if the opposition doesn't promote someone soon. I don't know how American politics choose leaders or when.


message 34: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 17156 comments The 2018 United States elections will mostly be held on Tuesday, November 6, 2018. These midterm elections will take place in the middle of Republican President Donald Trump's term. All 435 seats in the United States House of Representatives and 34 of the 100 seats in the United States Senate will be contested. 39 state and territorial governorships and numerous other state and local elections will also be contested.


message 35: by Madrano (new)

Madrano (madran) | 3732 comments Right, we can't evict Trump but we can hope to block his intentions by electing those who are not adhering the the president's political goals. Today's USA Today listed some of the programs the proposed budget wants to cut, i'd also like to see some of the items he's kept, which are money suckers with limited benefits for the military and/or businesses.

Ooops! Soap box exit...


message 36: by Julie (last edited Feb 16, 2018 05:01AM) (new)

Julie (readerjules) | 1208 comments Petra wrote: "Who is running against him? He may win by default if the opposition doesn't promote someone soon. I don't know how American politics choose leaders or when. ..."

Trump has 3 years left. Presidents have 4 year terms and then they can run for a second term. After that they can't run any more. So we are stuck with him unless he does something bad enough to be booted out or if he quits (I don't think a pres. quitting has ever happened, has it?) or otherwise can't perform the job. The hope is to get a democratic majority in congress so they all don't support everything he wants. Nowadays it seems like too many of them just automatically vote along party lines instead of actually trying to help this country.


message 37: by Madrano (new)

Madrano (madran) | 3732 comments Technically Richard Nixon resigned but just ahead of some sort of legal action, be it indictment or impeachment. And, as i understand things, Woodrow Wilson was incapable to fully serve but his staff & wife filled the void but this was toward the end of his second term.

I agree about the automatic voting on party lines. It's this the people are disgusted with and is probably why Trump was voted in. Many thought anything would be better than "politics as usual". Wonder how they feel about that decision now? Not the ultra right wing but those who felt they wanted something different.


message 38: by Julie (last edited Feb 16, 2018 07:32AM) (new)

Julie (readerjules) | 1208 comments Thanks....I actually don't know many details about Nixon. I am too young to actually know what was happening then and we never got that far into recent history in history classes.


message 39: by Bobbie (new)

Bobbie (bobbie572002) | 1084 comments Nixon did resign. Thankfully he had appointed a decent enough Vice President Gerald Ford.

Time for me to point out that the midterm vote is of prime importance now. Even if Trump were to be impeached that doesn't mean he would be gone. Impeachment is like an indictment and then there is a trial in the Senate. As of now, even if he were removed the policies are the policies. He did not do this all by himself.

Then as to who is going to run against him. It is WAY too early to focus on someone. In terms of campaigns that gives the opposition time to throw stuff at them for the next three years. Major damage. That's one of the things that happened to Hillary whatever else you may think of her.

And so it goes. Hang in there friends.


message 40: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 17156 comments (I don't think a pres. quitting has ever happened, has it?)

Nixon resigned.


message 41: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 17156 comments Bobbie wrote: As of now, even if he were removed the policies are the policies. He did not do this all by himself."

There are those Executive orders.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Executi...

Though I agree that the other branches of power are going along with these, too.

If he and the hard right are not checked in November, I shudder to think the damage that will be done and be beyond repair. :(


message 42: by Madrano (last edited Feb 16, 2018 01:43PM) (new)

Madrano (madran) | 3732 comments I fully agree with you Bobbie, this election is vital.

As an added note, i don't know that indicting Trump is the way to go, as Pence is as right wing as anyone and better organized, more stealth and more professional, than Trump. Our reputation overseas has been shot, might as well keep the guy we have. I may be wrong about that, either way (or skipping both to go to Ryan) is morally frightening in the context of democracy in the US.

If no one minds i'd like to add that while i realized the National Rifle Association was financing campaigns, etc., i was stunned at the amount spent on Trump, who you will remember has not had a campaign fund as long as most senators. They gave $21,000,000 for Trump's election alone, not counting our representatives. If this bothers anyone, let me know & i'll delete the post.


message 43: by Alias Reader (last edited Feb 16, 2018 01:57PM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 17156 comments Madrano wrote: If no one minds i'd like to add that while i realized the National Rifle Association was financing campaigns, etc., i was stunned at the amount spent on Trump, who you will remember has not had a campaign fund as long as most senators. They gave $21,000,000 for Trump's election alone, not counting our representatives. If this bothers anyone, let me know & i'll delete the post.

It's a fact. At least for the time, being Facts still matter. So I am fine with you posting it. :)

Who are the top 10 recipients of NRA money?
https://www.daytondailynews.com/news/...

Unfortunately, unless we start financing campaign only with government funds this will continue. With Citizens United we seem to be going in the other direction. Maybe I am just a pessimist, but I don't see things changing unless we change campaign funding.

As in other countries I would also like to see the campaign time limited. Maybe 6 months or a year at most. Now people need to start raising money and campaigning from the first day their are in office for the next election. Insanity.

And because many citizens are ill informed, they are easy prey. The people running for election know this. If the NRA targets you, you have very little chance of winning.




message 44: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 17156 comments


message 45: by Madrano (new)

Madrano (madran) | 3732 comments Happy New Year! The Chinese horoscope for the Dog shows us that the "Dog" is the person who's constantly tasked with listening to the pain and sorrows of others. Not to worry though, the faithful dog doesn't mind. They are a true believer in Justice and they will fight for fairness for themselves, their family, their friends, and anyone else in need. They are not cowards, and they believe that a life without honor is no life at all. Recent Dog years have been 1946, 1958, 1970, 1982, 1994, 2006.

Thanks for the 2016 stats. The stats i saw were for career donations but this is better.


message 46: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 17156 comments Madrano wrote: "Happy New Year! The Chinese horoscope for the Dog shows us that the "Dog" is the person who's constantly tasked with listening to the pain and sorrows of others. Not to worry though, the faithful d..."

Interesting. Thank you !


message 47: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 17156 comments Happy Presidents day weekend !




message 48: by madrano (new)

madrano | 9742 comments Right back at ya. We spent a few hours today at a political candidate forum, practicing democracy, i guess you could saw. Very good day. However, we ended up liking all 5 Democratic candidates running for Representative. What to do?!?!


message 49: by Bobbie (new)

Bobbie (bobbie572002) | 1084 comments Madrano wrote: "I fully agree with you Bobbie, this election is vital.

As an added note, i don't know that indicting Trump is the way to go, as Pence is as right wing as anyone and better organized, more stealth..."


As it stands if Trump is Impeached now he probably would not be voted out by the Senate. In any case you've made my point. The Republicans in the House and Senate as well as Pence could clearly carry on without him. The Executive Orders are only pieces of paper until the policies are put into practice.


message 50: by madrano (new)

madrano | 9742 comments And apparently vice versa, given that a sanctions act was passed by Congress, signed by Trump but not implemented. To be fair, apparently when he signed it he stated he had misgivings. No doubt.


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