2022 Reading Challenge discussion

131 views
ARCHIVE 2018 > Louise's 70+ books 2018

Comments Showing 1-50 of 75 (75 new)    post a comment »
« previous 1

message 1: by Louise (new)

Louise | 245 comments Challenging myself to read 70 books again this year. I managed it this year (will just squeeze in 75) but given I expect to be flat out at work for the next 12 moths I'm going to stick with a goal of 70. And, like this year, the aim if for at least 50% of my reading to be written by women.


message 2: by Susy (new)

Susy (susysstories) Louise wrote: "Challenging myself to read 70 books again this year. I managed it this year (will just squeeze in 75) but given I expect to be flat out at work for the next 12 moths I'm going to stick with a goal ..."

Wishing you the best of luck with your goal Louise & a very happy reading year!


message 3: by Louise (last edited Jan 01, 2018 12:35PM) (new)

Louise | 245 comments 1. The Queen of All Crows (The Map of Unknown Things, #1) by Rod Duncan The Queen of All Crows by Rod Duncan

Steampunk pirates! Waited for this release for so long that I actually feel kinda sad it's over and that I raced through it so fast. Love the series, love the main character. Want more John Farthing in the next book though.


message 4: by Blagica , Cheerleader! (new)

Blagica  | 12028 comments Wishing you the best of luck with your goal this year.


message 5: by Louise (new)

Louise | 245 comments Thank you :)

2. The Forsyte Saga by John Galsworthy The Man of Property (The Forsyte Saga #1) by John Galsworthy
Finally getting round to reading a book that's been on my shelf for yonks. Enjoying it so far, but I think a lot of that is influenced by me liking the 2003 tv adaptation, going to keep going with it though and see how I feel by the end of the series.
(This is an omnibus edition so once I've finished the series goodreads will still only count these as one book. But I know it's three novels that were originally published years apart, so I am going to count it as a seperate book each time I finish one)


message 6: by Louise (new)

Louise | 245 comments 3. The Forsyte Saga by John Galsworthy In Chancery (The Forsyte Saga #2) by John Galsworthy
So while I enjoy the story, these books could really have done with a more brutal editor. I'd say they could do with losing about 50% of the word count by ditching the repetition.
(This is an omnibus edition so once I've finished the series goodreads will still only count these as one book. But I know it's three novels that were originally published years apart, so I am going to count it as a seperate book each time I finish one)


message 7: by Louise (last edited Jan 18, 2018 03:46AM) (new)

Louise | 245 comments 4. The Forsyte Saga by John Galsworthy To Let (The Forsyte Saga #3) by John Galsworthy
Done! Finished! While these books were alright (this one the weakest of the three), I much preferred the TV series - a lot less waffle!
(This is an omnibus edition so once I've finished the series goodreads will still only count these as one book. But I know it's three novels that were originally published years apart, so I am going to count it as a seperate book each time I finish one)


message 8: by Joanne (new)

Joanne Bailey (jmbailey1) My mother and I loved The Forsyte Saga when it was on TV. Haven't read the books although mom had them. Brings back good memories. Thank you


message 9: by Louise (last edited Jan 28, 2018 11:05AM) (new)

Louise | 245 comments I watched the 2003 series with my mum as well. It was actually sitting in the theatre next to the dude that played Young Jolyon that made me finally pick this book up off my shelf and read it.

5. Do Not Say We Have Nothing by Madeleine Thien Do Not Say We Have Nothing by Madeleine Thien
Took me a while to get into it but a really good read in the end. Super depressing though.


message 10: by Louise (last edited Feb 01, 2018 11:17AM) (new)

Louise | 245 comments 6. Across the Nightingale Floor (Tales of the Otori, #1) by Lian Hearn Across the Nightingale Floor by Lian Hearn
Readable but not actually very good. Probably won't read the rest of the series.


message 11: by Blagica , Cheerleader! (new)

Blagica  | 12028 comments Hoping you had fun getting lost in some pages in your first month!


message 12: by Susy (new)

Susy (susysstories) Looks like you're on track Louise! Nice!!


message 13: by Louise (last edited Feb 11, 2018 06:17AM) (new)

Louise | 245 comments Thanks, just about staying on track!

7. The Long Song by Andrea Levy The Long Song by Andrea Levy
Not as harrowing as some of the other slavery narratives but still a very heavy read. Very good, but looking forward to something a little lighter next.


message 14: by Louise (new)

Louise | 245 comments 8. The Old Man of the Moon (Little Black Classics, #60) by Shen Fu The Old Man of the Moon by Shen Fu
Part of the penguin little black classics (short stories/extracts for 80p). I'm sure the book this comes from is a very significant piece of Chinese literature, but the extract contained here didn't really catch my attention.


message 15: by Louise (new)

Louise | 245 comments 9. Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow
Long, but very interesting. Have never really studied or looked into the American Revolution before so lots of new information for me. And added context to the musical!


message 16: by Louise (new)

Louise | 245 comments 10. Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman
Really enjoyed this one. A slightly tough read given how some of the themes hit a little close to home, but also very funny.


message 17: by Louise (new)

Louise | 245 comments 11. Harry Potter A History of Magic by J.K. Rowling Harry Potter: A History of Magic by Various Authors
I saw the exhibition at the British Library earlier this month and this is basically the book version of it. Was nice to e able to spend a little longer peering at some of the more interesting stuff though (like JKs first drafts of chapters and stuff), rather than getting stuck behind slow readers, which happened a lot in the exhibition.


message 18: by Louise (new)

Louise | 245 comments 12. Beauty Queens by Libba Bray Beauty Queens by Libba Bray
The idea (Lord of the Flies but with teenage girls competing in a beauty contest!) is fun but silly. The execution though was not really as good as I wanted it to be. Very heavy handed writing and plot points just thrown in seemingly for the lolz factor. I kind of liked it in the end, but it's not good.


message 19: by Blagica , Cheerleader! (new)

Blagica  | 12028 comments You are doing great! Hoping March is a smashing success for you.


message 20: by Louise (new)

Louise | 245 comments 13. Wild Swans Three Daughters of China by Jung Chang Wild Swans: Three Daughters of China by Jung Chang
Biography of the author's family and their life in 20th Century China from her grandmother's concubinage to to a warlord down to the author's own time in the red guards, the cultural revolution and all the various atrocities and purges in-between. A powerful book and written in a very accessible way (almost more like a novel than a non-fiction). But somehow I can't help thinking that the author's family always come off a bit too well - I'm probably just a cynic though. And it is a very important and well written book.


message 21: by Louise (new)

Louise | 245 comments 14. The Dry by Jane Harper The Dry by Jane Harper
This month's book group read. Probably wouldn't have picked it up on my own, but I really enjoyed it. Do love a good murder mystery sometimes. And the first time for a while that I've sat down and pretty much read a book in a day. Will definitely be reading the sequel and then the rest of the series once they drop in kindle price a bit/get released.


message 22: by Louise (new)

Louise | 245 comments 15. Black and British A Forgotten History by David Olusoga Black and British: A Forgotten History by David Olusoga
A fascinating study of Black British history and of the institutional racism of progressive British governments. The chapters are a bit long to digest in one sitting (which is how I prefer to read my Non-Fiction, in bitesize daily chunks) but it is well worth ploughing through and very readably written.


message 23: by Louise (new)

Louise | 245 comments 16. Rivers of London, Volume 4 Detective Stories by Ben Aaronovitch Rivers of London, Volume 4: Detective Stories by Ben Aaronovitch
A fun collection of some of Peter Grant's shorter adventures, as retold by him in his Detectives Exam Interview. While I love Rivers of London, I still read the comics more for my completionist sake than anything else. It's all about the main Novels/Novellas really. Still, the comics are never a bad read, even if the art doesn't match up with my imagination of the characters.

17. Saga, Vol. 8 (Saga, #8) by Brian K. Vaughan Saga, Vol. 8 by Brian K. Vaughan
Another comic to bring my average page count crashing down! Bloody love Saga. Was reeeeally concerned when the volume opened up with a visit to 'Abortion Town' that it might go into some anti-choice bull that would have to make me abandon the series in anger. I should have had more faith.


message 24: by Louise (new)

Louise | 245 comments 18. The Monkey's Voyage How Improbable Journeys Shaped the History of Life by Alan de Queiroz The Monkey's Voyage: How Improbable Journeys Shaped the History of Life by Alan de Queiroz
A lot more theoretical and accademic than I was expecting. Wouldn't necessarily recommend it to a casual reader of popular science or natural history. It's more of a manifesto for a theory than a fun selection of stories about animal dispersal (there are plenty of stories in there, but they form examples and evidence rather than the main focus). But I found it utterly fascinating and accessible enough for me to understand.


message 25: by Louise (new)

Louise | 245 comments 19. Sea of Poppies (Ibis Trilogy, #1) by Amitav Ghosh Sea of Poppies by Amitav Ghosh
Uuuuugh, this was my jam. Desperately need to get book 2 and 3, but desperately worried that the focus might move off my faves in the next books.


message 26: by Louise (new)

Louise | 245 comments 20. The Good Immigrant by Nikesh Shukla The Good Immigrant Edited by Nikesh Shukla
A series of essays by British writers of colour on being (or being perceived of as) an immigrant in the UK. The editor was a keynote speaker in a conference I went to earlier this year, immediately bought his book, and am really glad I did. Important stuff to start opening my eyes to a bit better.


message 27: by Blagica , Cheerleader! (new)

Blagica  | 12028 comments A book is a dream that you hold in your hand. I hope that April brings you many more five star reads. Do you have a stand out book so far this year?


message 28: by Louise (new)

Louise | 245 comments Hmmmm. My favourites so far would probably have to be Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine and Sea of Poppies.

I loved The Queen of All Crows too, but that's partly because I fell in love with the characters already in the earlier novels (starting with The Bullet-Catcher’s Daughter), so I already knew I was going to enjoy it.

21. Zoo City by Lauren Beukes Zoo City by Lauren Beukes
Still not sure what to think of this one, the writing was good, the setting and worldbuilding was really fascinating and the main character fantastic but the plot felt a bit disjointed. Though I'm not sure how much f that was because I was reading it in little snatches of time rather than able to sit down with it properly. I enjoyed it a lot, but felt a little lost in places.


message 29: by Louise (new)

Louise | 245 comments 22. Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race by Reni Eddo-Lodge Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race by Reni Eddo-Lodge
Another non-fiction on the way in which society (specifically British) treats people of colour. And why it's emotionally exhausting to be viewed as the 'spokesperson' for an entire race in everything you say and do. I thought it was a very thoughtful and intelligent book.

23. Under the Udala Trees by Chinelo Okparanta Under the Udala Trees by Chinelo Okparanta
Powerful LGBT story set in 20th Century Nigeria as a reaction against recent anti-gay legislation that came into effect in 2014 to criminalise homosexual acts. Felt the ending was a little abrupt but overall enjoyed a lot.

24. Other Minds by Peter Godfrey-Smith Other Minds by Peter Godfrey-Smith
Marine biology/philosophy on the evolution of the octopus' brain. Enjoyed the marine biology more than the philosophy.


message 30: by Louise (new)

Louise | 245 comments 25. The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August by Claire North The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August by Claire North
Too boring for me to expend energy talking about how boring it turned out to be. A book group pick. Not sure we should let Matt pick books again ever.


message 31: by Louise (new)

Louise | 245 comments 26. Waking Gods (Themis Files, #2) by Sylvain Neuvel Waking Gods by Sylvain Neuvel
Really enjoying this series. Only one day till the next book comes out, timed this almost perfectly!


message 32: by Blagica , Cheerleader! (new)

Blagica  | 12028 comments You are doing great! I hope May is a fantastic month filled with books and sunshine!


message 33: by Louise (new)

Louise | 245 comments Thanks, you too!

27. Women & Power A Manifesto by Mary Beard Women & Power: A Manifesto by Mary Beard
An interesting but short (and ultimately rather simplistic) feminist read that can be enjoyed in one evening over a bottle of wine. Down with the patriarchy.


message 34: by Louise (new)

Louise | 245 comments 28. Only Human Themis Files Book 3 by Sylvain Neuvel Only Human by Sylvain Neuvel
Finished the series. Not as good as the first two but still pretty great.


message 35: by Louise (new)

Louise | 245 comments 29. The Burning Maze (The Trials of Apollo #3) by Rick Riordan The Burning Maze by Rick Riordan
I will never grow out of Rick Riordan books (granted, I didn't actually start them until I was in my twenties soo...).


message 36: by Louise (new)

Louise | 245 comments 30. The Finding of Martha Lost by Caroline Wallace The Finding of Martha Lost by Caroline Wallace
Another subpar group read. All much too cutesy for me.


message 37: by Louise (new)

Louise | 245 comments 31. Much Obliged, Jeeves (Jeeves, #14) by P.G. Wodehouse Much Obliged, Jeeves by P.G. Wodehouse
I do enjoy Jeeves and Wooster, they're hilarious easy reads, but after a point they are pretty much all the same. Hopefully it's got me back into the reading groove after how awful Martha Lost was though.


message 38: by Louise (new)

Louise | 245 comments 32. This is Going to Hurt Secret Diaries of a Junior Doctor by Adam Kay This is Going to Hurt: Secret Diaries of a Junior Doctor by Adam Kay
The first book I've had time/inclination to read in a single sitting for a very long time. Absolutely brilliant. Both hilarious and heartbreaking. Also, as the author worked mainly in ob-gyn, it's full of fascinating and horrific birthing stories that make me 100% glad I don't want kids.


message 39: by Louise (last edited Jun 04, 2018 08:26AM) (new)

Louise | 245 comments 33. The End We Start From by Megan Hunter The End We Start From by Megan Hunter
A short novel. Woman gives birth just before a gigantic flood swallows London and leaves people fleeing for safety. Was way more interested in the very few detail of the dystopian setting than I was in the many many details of baby Z's gurgling, smiling, and sucking on nipples. Probably says more about my lack of interest in babies and motherhood than the quality of the book though.


message 40: by Louise (new)

Louise | 245 comments 34. Maria in the Moon by Louise Beech Maria in the Moon by Louise Beech
Really good book let down slightly by a contrived element near the end that it could have done happily without. Still really enjoyed it though. Will look up more of the author's stuff.


message 41: by Louise (new)

Louise | 245 comments DNF
The Rottweiler by Ruth Rendell The Rottweiler by Ruth Rendell
Took this off a coworker's hands when she was moving and decided to offer me a pile of books, most of which were awful (I'm talking twilight, da vinci code etc.). I like her a lot so to be polite I picked this as the best of a bad bunch, but only got to about 60 pages before I had to abandon it. So bad.


message 42: by Louise (new)

Louise | 245 comments 35. Aunts Aren't Gentlemen by P.G. Wodehouse Aunts Aren't Gentlemen by P.G. Wodehouse
After 13 books these are all much of a muchness, but I still enjoy them as a bit of an easy summer read. That's the final book though, so will have to look for something else to fill that gap in future.


message 43: by Louise (new)

Louise | 245 comments 36. The Colour of Bee Larkham’s Murder by Sarah J. Harris The Colour of Bee Larkham’s Murder by Sarah J. Harris
Book group read. Probably not one I would have picked up myself, but I quite enjoyed it. I found the main characters incredibly irritating though. And I'd be interested to hear how accurate the synaesthesia stuff was from someone who actually experiences it.


message 44: by Louise (new)

Louise | 245 comments 37. Like Water for Chocolate by Laura Esquivel Like Water for Chocolate by Laura Esquivel
I know this is meant to be great but I wasn't a huge fan. Hard to care about the love story when the love interest is barely fleshed out beyond 'colosolly insensitive dickhead'.


message 45: by Louise (last edited Jul 06, 2018 12:47PM) (new)


message 46: by Blagica , Cheerleader! (new)

Blagica  | 12028 comments Hoping July is full of page turning and falling in love with a new book!


message 47: by Louise (last edited Aug 05, 2018 05:33AM) (new)

Louise | 245 comments 39. The President's Gardens by Muhsin Al-Ramli The President's Gardens by Muhsin Al-Ramli
Took me foreverto get into this, I think I just wasn't in quite the right mood, but once I did, I really loved it.


message 48: by Louise (new)

Louise | 245 comments 40. Stay With Me by Ayọ̀bámi Adébáyọ̀ Stay With Me by Ayọ̀bámi Adébáyọ̀
A much quicker read for me. Short but very powerful novel.


message 49: by Louise (new)

Louise | 245 comments 41. Blue A Memoir- Keeping the Peace and Falling to Pieces by John Sutherland Blue: A Memoir- Keeping the Peace and Falling to Pieces by John Sutherland
A loan from a friend who has just joined the Met Police. A powerful account of a senior officer's experience as a policeman and the mental breakdown he suffered as a result.


message 50: by Louise (new)

Louise | 245 comments 42. Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli
Something a bit light and fluffier after a lot of rather heavy reads. Still a really important subject matter, but delivered in a light way that I appreciated. Gay people can be happy in fiction! Enjoyed a lot. Definitely going to read the sequel.


« previous 1
back to top