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Archive Authors 2021 > 2018 January Authors: Brontë family

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message 1: by Lesle, Appalachain Bibliophile (new)

Lesle | 5424 comments Mod
The Brontës were a nineteenth-century literary family associated with the village of Haworth in the West Riding of Yorkshire, England. The sisters, Charlotte (1816–1855), Emily (1818–1848), and Anne (1820–1849), are well known as poets and novelists. Like many contemporary female writers, they originally published their poems and novels under male pseudonyms: Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell. Their stories immediately attracted attention for their passion and originality. Charlotte's Jane Eyre was the first to know success, while Emily's Wuthering Heights, Anne's The Tenant of Wildfell Hall and other works were later to be accepted as masterpieces of literature.

Comment on your thoughts of the Bronte Sisters and Branwell or you may read one of the other books in the Poll and discuss and comment here.


message 2: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (traceyrb) | 1362 comments I loved Wuthering Heights and is one of my favourite books. I have a book of poetry by Emily also and love her poems.
Anne's The Tenant of Wildfell Hall I liked too and have read by Charlotte Jane Eyre and Villette. Jane Eyre was the better of the two.
I think if they had lived Anne and Emily would have been better authors than Charlotte.


message 3: by Lesle, Appalachain Bibliophile (new)

Lesle | 5424 comments Mod
From what I understand Charlotte made it really hard on Anne.

Anne did not glamorize the men that were violent like her sisters did. She was less romantic in her writing as well.

Their brother Branwell gave the sisters a lot to work with he was handsome, charming and an alcoholic.


message 4: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8818 comments Mod
I think Shirley is my favourite Charlotte Bronte book, followed closely by Jane Eyre. I have not read The Professor yet.


message 5: by Kathy (new)

Kathy | 1086 comments In my copy of Agnes Grey there is a long introduction about the Bronte family which is very enlightening. I think since Charlotte lived longer than Anne and Emily, she was able to shape how people thought about the family as a whole. She was awfully bossy!

I've read Jane Eyre several times, Wuthering Heights a long time ago, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall last year, and now Agnes Grey. My favorite is Tenant of Wildfell Hall. I was surprised by how much I like it.


message 6: by Lesle, Appalachain Bibliophile (new)

Lesle | 5424 comments Mod
Kathy I have read those you listed including Jane Eyre but I have not read Agnes Grey as of yet an I have to agree The Tenant of Wildfell Hall is my favorite so far too!


message 7: by Patrick (new)

Patrick I responded to the Brontës very young - both their own writings and their life stories. I must have read Wuthering Heights and Jane Eyre by the time I was 14 (I was pretty precocious). I read biographies and criticism of them at that time, too, such as Fannie Ratchford's excellent The Brontës' Web of Childhood.


message 8: by Catherine (last edited Jan 10, 2018 09:01AM) (new)

Catherine Habbie I have always loved Wuthering heights , Jane Eyre & Shirley and recently enjoyed Vilette. The Professor seems like an extension of Vilette and I have not yet finished it. I am still discovering more gems from Charlotte.
All 3 sisters seem to have created alternate worlds for us.Must visit their home someday to know what inspired them all.


message 9: by Lesle, Appalachain Bibliophile (new)

Lesle | 5424 comments Mod
Catherine that would be so interesting. You would get such a sense of them in the own home.

At least that was how I felt after visiting Hemingway's home.


message 10: by Catherine (new)

Catherine Habbie It is on my bucket list!


message 11: by Tracey (last edited Jan 10, 2018 09:23AM) (new)

Tracey (traceyrb) | 1362 comments I have visited Bronte country and also the home that inspired Thornfield Hall,(North Lees Hall although some think it was Haddon Hall. I have visited both being a Yorkshire lass) and all are in isolated areas but yet have great beauty too. The family were quite isolated and poor. Patrick Bronte was quite strict and the girls had a poor diet. I read a lot about the family and how to supplement the lack in their outer world they created inner worlds. Charlotte was greatly effected by the loss of her older sisters. Patrick Bronte died after seeing all his children die and Charlotte's husband returned to Ireland and remarried but many believed was in love with her to his dying day. The Life of Charlotte Brontë by Elizabeth Gaskell is worth reading.


message 12: by Catherine (new)

Catherine Habbie Lucky you Tracey! I hear the house is a museum now?


message 14: by Susan (new)

Susan Budd (susanbudd) | 37 comments Tracey wrote: "The Life of Charlotte Brontë by Elizabeth Gaskell is worth reading."

I agree. I read all the Brontë novels a long time ago followed by Gaskell's biography. Of the three sisters, I liked Charlotte's novels the least, but what I liked best about Gaskell's biography of her was learning about Branwell. Back then I was unaware of Daphne du Maurier's biography of him, The Infernal World of Branwell Brontë. I recently discovered this book and look forward to reading it soon.


message 15: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (traceyrb) | 1362 comments Out of all the Bronte books I have read, Wuthering Heights is my favourite.


message 16: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (traceyrb) | 1362 comments To understand the Bronte children one needs to look at the father.

Interesting article

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/...


message 17: by Catherine (new)

Catherine Habbie That is my favourite too! Thanks for the link, I know where I am going soon...


message 18: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (traceyrb) | 1362 comments Susan wrote: "Tracey wrote: "The Life of Charlotte Brontë by Elizabeth Gaskell is worth reading."

I agree. I read all the Brontë novels a long time ago followed by Gaskell's biography. Of the three sisters, I l..."


That is supposed to be a good work about him. Happy reading and maybe you can update the thread about what you read :)


message 19: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (traceyrb) | 1362 comments Catherine wrote: "That is my favourite too! Thanks for the link, I know where I am going soon..."

Just an FYI, it is Emily Bronte's bicentenary this year and there should be things going on at the Bronte Museum to celebrate this. Have fun Catherine :)


message 20: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (traceyrb) | 1362 comments I read the following books many years ago which are biographies of the Brontes and I recommend
Dark Quartet: The Story of the Brontës

Path to the Silent Country both by Lynne Reid Banks


message 21: by Catherine (new)

Catherine Habbie Thanks Tracey. Top of my list!


message 22: by Lesle, Appalachain Bibliophile (new)

Lesle | 5424 comments Mod
Thank you Tracey they do seem very interesting! Glad you recommended, there are so many books out there about the Brontes.


message 23: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8818 comments Mod
I can second the recommendation for The Dark Quartet. The book is interesting and very readable. The other book is on my physical to-read shelf. Maybe this year?


message 24: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (traceyrb) | 1362 comments It is thought that Anne Bronte loved William Weightman, who Mr. Weston in Agnes Grey is based on. She wrote the following poem after his death:

I will not mourn thee, lovely one,
Though thou art torn away.
'Tis said that if the morning sun
Arise with dazzling ray
And shed a bright and burning beam
Athwart the glittering main,
'Ere noon shall fade that laughing gleam
Engulfed in clouds and rain.

And if thy life as transient proved,
It hath been full as bright,
For thou wert hopeful and beloved;
Thy spirit knew no blight.

If few and short the joys of life
That thou on earth couldst know,
Little thou knew'st of sin and strife
Nor much of pain and woe.

If vain thy earthly hopes did prove,
Thou canst not mourn their flight;
Thy brightest hopes were fixed above
And they shall know no blight.

And yet I cannot check my sighs,
Thou wert so young and fair,
More bright than summer morning skies,
But stern death would not spare;

He would not pass our darling by
Nor grant one hour's delay,
But rudely closed his shining eye
And frowned his smile away,

That angel smile that late so much
Could my fond heart rejoice;
And he has silenced by his touch
The music of thy voice.

I'll weep no more thine early doom,
But O! I still must mourn
The pleasures buried in thy tomb,
For they will not return.


message 25: by Lesle, Appalachain Bibliophile (new)

Lesle | 5424 comments Mod
Here is a few other books:

A Life of Anne Brontë by Edward Chitham
biography


The Brontës by Juliet Barker
biography


The Brontës: A Life in Letters by Juliet Barker
letters


message 26: by Catherine (new)

Catherine Habbie Happy birthday Anne Bronte.


message 27: by Tracey (last edited Jan 17, 2018 09:07AM) (new)

Tracey (traceyrb) | 1362 comments There is also a new book which I hoped to win on Goodreads giveaways but didn't :( Anyhow it looks interesting

Without the Veil Between, Anne Brontë: A Fine and Subtle Spirit by D.M. Denton


message 28: by Serian (new)

Serian (mamapata) | 14 comments I always find the Brontes very hard going (I've read Wuthering Heights and Jane Eyre but nothing by Anne Bronte). I have difficulties with angst in novels, which puts me off a lot of classic authors. Obviously suffering is a part of life and I have read some incredible and very grim books, but I cannot cope with a lack of agency, which seems to categorise their books.


message 29: by Beth Buning (new)

Beth Buning | 28 comments I "accidentally" read Jane Eyre when I was 16. I forget to choose a book for the term paper I was supposed to write, and that book was on a cart in the classroom. Absolutely loved it, and continued to write about Charlotte for several projects in college too.
I have also read Wuthering Heights and for me itI doesn't compare to Jane Eyre.


message 30: by Lesle, Appalachain Bibliophile (new)

Lesle | 5424 comments Mod
Beth I agree totally with Jane Eyre over Wuthering Heights!


message 31: by Patrick (new)

Patrick Dissent here. I love Jane Eyre too, but for me Wuthering Heights is one of the pinnacles of English-language fiction - an inexhaustibly rich, complex, and suggestive text.

ALL the movie and television adaptations of Wuthering Heights misrepresent the novel badly by omitting the second generation. But the second generation - the repetition of tragic patterns - is a large part of the POINT of the book. It is very unromantic. Wuthering Heights is not a romance novel. The adaptations try to make it one.


message 32: by Catherine (new)

Catherine Habbie I thrive on re-reading Wuthering Heights.It is one of the few books from my collection that I brought with me.


message 33: by Patrick (new)

Patrick Catherine wrote: "I thrive on re-reading Wuthering Heights.It is one of the few books from my collection that I brought with me."

I agree. I always find more there.


message 34: by Samantha, Cajun Literary Belle (new)

Samantha (cajunliterarybelle) | 2521 comments Mod
Currently reading Jane Eyre and have Wuthering Heights on the list for this year. I just happened upon them both in years last - Wuthering Heights 2.5 years ago near the time my local bookstore was closing. I found a paperback copy with some kind of analysis in the back that intrigued me. Jane Eyre I discovered when my K-Mart closed last spring. The Word Cloud Classic (beautiful books, my first of the kind) just sat on a shelf marked down a little and staring at me. I had to buy it. From the way everyone is talking, I seem to have made the best choices in Brontë novels to read.


message 35: by Lesle, Appalachain Bibliophile (new)

Lesle | 5424 comments Mod
Oh not really dissent, just a preference. The first time I was reading Wuthering Heights I kept searching for the romance, but alas was not there.
The storyline is intense and Heathcliff is a dark Gothic character. Wuthering Heights is actually in a league of its own. I guess when thinking about it they are not comparable.


message 36: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new)

Rosemarie | 8818 comments Mod
I agree, Lesle. Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights are completely different kinds of books, and both are representative of their authors- Charlotte and
Emily.


message 37: by Kathy (new)

Kathy | 1086 comments I have a new copy of Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë from Penguin Classics that I'm looking forward to reading. It's a re-read but I read the book the first time so many years ago it'll be interesting to see what I think of it now.


message 38: by Lesle, Appalachain Bibliophile (new)

Lesle | 5424 comments Mod
A beautiful looking book Kathy!


message 39: by Pillsonista (last edited Jan 29, 2018 05:10AM) (new)

Pillsonista | 303 comments Emily Brontë was a visionary genius of stunning originality, much more in the vein of William Blake (whom she almost certainly had never read) and that other, American, Emily: Emily Dickinson. Much more so than she was to Charlotte (herself a genius, imo), let alone Anne.

For instance, No Coward Soul is Mine:

No coward soul is mine
No trembler in the world's storm-troubled sphere
I see Heaven's glories shine,
And Faith shines equal arming me from Fear.

O God within my breast,
Almighty ever-present Deity!
Life, that in me hast rest,
As I Undying Life, have power in Thee!

Vain are the thousand creeds
That move men's hearts, unutterably vain,
Worthless as withered weeds,
Or idlest froth amid the boundless main

To waken doubt in one
Holding so fast by thy infinity,
So surely anchored on
The steadfast rock of Immortality.

With wide-embracing love
Thy spirit animates eternal years,
Pervades and broods above,
Changes, sustains, dissolves, creates and rears

Though Earth and moon were gone,
And suns and universes ceased to be,
And Thou wert left alone
Every Existence would exist in thee.

There is not room for Death
Nor atom that his might could render void:
Since thou art Being and Breath,
And what thou art may never be destroyed.


That's... well, let's just say it's not exactly the kind of morality, let alone the kind of theology, we typically associate with the Victorian era. Clearly, this kind of gnostic inspiration was a personal creed all her own, and one that only she fully understood (if even she did).


message 40: by Lesle, Appalachain Bibliophile (new)

Lesle | 5424 comments Mod
Pillsonista, thank you for sharing. Pretty remarkable indeed.


message 41: by Sydney (new)

Sydney (slknutsen) | 462 comments There is a 1973 TV version called, The Brontes of Haworth with a young Michael Kitchen. Depicts their lives as young women writers in a man's world of their day, along with the wayward Branwell, their brother. Was worth viewing.


message 42: by Samantha, Cajun Literary Belle (new)

Samantha (cajunliterarybelle) | 2521 comments Mod
After I finish Jane Eyre, I’m considering watching a movie adaptation of it. Does anyone recommend a specific one?


message 43: by Sydney (new)

Sydney (slknutsen) | 462 comments There are so many of them out there. Take your pick. Truly, I've never seen a bad one yet. Each actor/actress will have his/her own interpretation of the respective roles. Can't beat a BBC production.


message 44: by Samantha, Cajun Literary Belle (new)

Samantha (cajunliterarybelle) | 2521 comments Mod
Sydney wrote: "There are so many of them out there. Take your pick. Truly, I've never seen a bad one yet. Each actor/actress will have his/her own interpretation of the respective roles. Can't beat a BBC production."

Thanks, Sydney! I'll keep that in mind.


message 45: by Lesle, Appalachain Bibliophile (new)

Lesle | 5424 comments Mod
I second the BBC versions!


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