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Previous Group Read Nominations > Book Nominations Jan 15-Mar 14 Group Read

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message 1: by Melanti (new)

Melanti | 2125 comments Mod
It's now time for book nominations.

African/African American and Caribbean has won by a hair.


message 2: by Shomeret (new)

Shomeret | 286 comments I would like to nominate a children's book that I consider awesome. It's Bayou Magic by Jewell Parker Rhodes. It deals with Afro-Caribbean spirituality and magic.


message 3: by Leah (new)

Leah (flying_monkeys) | 1009 comments If we're not doing nominations in our usual categories, then please count my below Adult nomination for this round.

YA: Zahrah the Windseeker by Nnedi Okorafor

Adult: Will Do Magic for Small Change by Andrea Hairston This one could also count for the 2018 challenge #5 - A book that has been nominated for the Mythopoeic Award.


message 5: by Jalilah (new)

Jalilah | 4438 comments Mod
Leah wrote: "If we're not doing nominations in our usual categories, then please count my below Adult nomination for this round.."

Yes, we are having our usual categories!

Everyone can nominate three books: one YA novel, one adult and one original tale or collection of original tales.

I just arrived back from a holiday vacation in Mexico where I did not have internet.
I will have to look around but for original tales I would like to nominate:
The Annotated African American Folktales by Henry Louis Gates Jr. and Maria Tatar


message 6: by Tamara (new)

Tamara Agha-Jaffar | 745 comments Welcome back, Lila. Hope you had vacation.


message 7: by Melanti (new)

Melanti | 2125 comments Mod
Lila wrote: "The Annotated African American Folktales by Henry Louis Gates Jr. and Maria Tatar ..."

Yay! It's long, so I was hesitating on nominating that myself, but it was my souvenir from a recent business trip, so I'd love to read it.


message 8: by Melanti (new)

Melanti | 2125 comments Mod
Hm. Nnedi Okorafor has already been nominated twice, and I've read most of Nalo Hopkinson's stuff, already...

Hm. . What else?

For original, I'll nominate Mules and Men by Zora Neale Hurston. (Yes, she was a folklorist in addition to an author.) While I'd love to read the one Lila nominated, there probably ought to be a shorter nomination, too.


message 9: by Jalilah (new)

Jalilah | 4438 comments Mod
Melanti wrote: "For original, I'll nominate Mules and Men by Zora Neale Hurston. (Yes, she was a folklorist in addition to an author)"

There is a book of hers I've been wanting to read for ages, Their Eyes Were Watching God. I know you've read it. Does it have any myths or folk tales in it? From the description it looks like not.

Melanti wrote: "Lila wrote: "The Annotated African American Folktales by Henry Louis Gates Jr. and Maria Tatar ..."
The
Yay! It's long, so I was hesitating on nominating that myself, but it was my souvenir from a rec..."


Oh my 704 pages! I did not see that before I nominated it! Oh well, like when Italian Folktales was the group read, people don't have to read all the stories.


message 10: by Melanti (new)

Melanti | 2125 comments Mod
Lila wrote: "There is a book of hers I've been wanting to read for ages, Their Eyes Were Watching God. I know you've read it. Does it have any myths or folk tales in it? From the description it looks like not. ..."

It's been a while since I read it. I want to say, not really. Maybe some minor themes and/or motifs, but it just doesn't play a huge role that I can remember.
But maybe my memory is faulty... I just Googled it and there's been several papers written about the use of folklore in the book.


Lila wrote: "Oh my 704 pages!..."

Huh. No, it's not 700 pages. Only 650. Granted, that's not that much better, but it's something.

But, really, there's only 500 pages of tales. After that, there's around 50 pages of forwards to other books, and quotes from people about the importance of folktales, a bit under 100 pages of photos, then an index, bibliography, etc, takes up the rest of the space.


message 11: by Melanti (last edited Dec 31, 2017 02:29PM) (new)

Melanti | 2125 comments Mod
For adult, I"m going to nominate one of Zora Neale Hurston's lesser known books: Jonah's Gourd Vine

This one isn't a retelling, but from the sounds of some of the reviews, it sounds like she's incorporated quite a bit of folklore.


Wait, even better: Moses, Man of the Mountain
Combining Exodus with the Moses of folklore.


message 12: by Patrick (new)

Patrick Anything by Zora is aces with me. I've read Mules and Men, it's very good.


message 13: by Jalilah (last edited Jan 01, 2018 07:11AM) (new)

Jalilah | 4438 comments Mod
The Ottawa public library system does not have any of the books by Zora Neale Hurston that gave been nominated here! :( I'll have to request an interlibrary loan or change my nomination.


message 14: by Jalilah (last edited Jan 01, 2018 09:56AM) (new)

Jalilah | 4438 comments Mod
When I just tried to order The Annotated African American Folktalesas an interlibrary loan I was notified that it's not possible because it came out in 2017. So now I've made a request that my library purchase it. Hopefully that will work!
I did an interlibrary loan for Mules and Men just in case it wins!
I'm very excited about this group read and happy this theme won!


message 15: by Asaria (last edited Jan 01, 2018 08:12AM) (new)

Asaria | 642 comments Speaking of Zora. Did she always adjust the spelling to accurately depict varied dialects in her books? To this day I remember Their Eyes Were Watching God and the challenge of deciphering the meaning hidden beneath it :)


message 16: by Jalilah (new)

Jalilah | 4438 comments Mod
Leah wrote: " YA: Zahrah the Windseeker by Nnedi Okorafor

Adult: Will Do Magic for Small Change by Andrea Hairston This one could also count for the 2018 challenge #5 - A book that has been nominated for the Mythopoeic Award.
"


I just checked out the reviews for Will Do Magic for Small Change and one of the reviewers wrote that her writing "feels like Octavia Butler crossed with Charles de Lint"!
That's enough to make me want to read it!


message 17: by Melanti (new)

Melanti | 2125 comments Mod
Asaria wrote: "Speaking of Zora. Did she always adjust the spelling to accurately depict varied dialects in her books? To this day I remember Their Eyes Were Watching God and the challenge of deciphe..."

I'm not sure about always, but Every Tongue Got to Confess: Negro Folk-tales from the Gulf States was also written in dialect.


message 18: by Patrick (new)

Patrick Anyone who is interested in Zora Neale Hurston should read Valerie Boyd's biography, Wrapped in Rainbows. It is magnificent.


message 19: by Melanti (new)

Melanti | 2125 comments Mod
Lila wrote: "When I just tried to order The Annotated African American Folktalesas an interlibrary loan I was notified that it's not possible because it came out in 2017. So now I've made a requ..."

Aww, I'm sorry. Yeah, it just came out a couple of months ago. Brand new.


message 20: by Asaria (last edited Jan 01, 2018 10:34AM) (new)

Asaria | 642 comments Melanti wrote: "I'm not sure about always, but Every Tongue Got to Confess: Negro Folk-tales from the Gulf States was also written in dialect. "
That's great for preserving cultures and traditions even if it makes the text very difficult to understand (For me) .


message 21: by Jalilah (new)

Jalilah | 4438 comments Mod
Asaria wrote: "Melanti wrote: "I'm not sure about always, but Every Tongue Got to Confess: Negro Folk-tales from the Gulf States was also written in dialect. "
That's great for preserving cultures and traditions ..."


When I looked up Their Eyes Were Watching God a number of reviews said they had a hard time understanding the dialect. Then I looked up Mules and Men and one reviewer said that if someone already had a hard time with the language in Their Eyes they shouldn't even attempt Mules and Men.

I can't say how it will be for me. I've gotten into Nalo Hopkinson's books without any problems, but can't understand Shakespeare 🤣!


message 22: by Asaria (last edited Jan 01, 2018 12:47PM) (new)

Asaria | 642 comments Lila wrote: "Then I looked up Mules and Men and one reviewer said that if someone already had a hard time with the language in Their Eyes they shouldn't even attempt Mules and Men. "

Thanks for warning. In that case I'll pass.

Lila wrote: "I can't say how it will be for me. I've gotten into Nalo Hopkinson's books without any problems, but can't understand Shakespeare"

Good luck!


message 23: by Melanti (new)

Melanti | 2125 comments Mod
Lila wrote: "I can't say how it will be for me. I've gotten into Nalo Hopkinson's books without any problems, but can't understand Shakespeare 🤣! ..."

It's just dialect though. Just sound it out in your head. It takes some getting used to, but it's not that bad.

Shakespeare's completely different.


message 24: by Leah (new)

Leah (flying_monkeys) | 1009 comments It took me a while to decide what I wanted to nominate for original. I'm listing two because I'm not sure if the first one counts as an "original," but it's by Virginia Hamilton (a storytelling legend to we Ohioans) :) If her book doesn't fit just accept my second choice as my nom this time.

Original: The People Could Fly: American Black Folktales by Virginia Hamilton

Original (Alternate): African American Folktales


message 25: by Shomeret (new)

Shomeret | 286 comments Lila wrote: "Leah wrote: " YA: Zahrah the Windseeker by Nnedi Okorafor

Adult: Will Do Magic for Small Change by Andrea Hairston This one could also count for the 2018 challenge #5 - A book that has been nomina..."


I started it and loved what I read, but it's long so I keep on having to renew, return and re-request it from the library.


message 26: by Jalilah (new)

Jalilah | 4438 comments Mod
I'm still in vacation mode and did not realize the polls should have gone up yesterday! Anyway they are up now!
https://www.goodreads.com/poll/list/3...
Leah, I added both of your nominations and I added the YA book The Chaosby Nalo Hopkinson to make an even 4 choices for each category!


message 27: by Jalilah (new)

Jalilah | 4438 comments Mod
Oh and for some reason I can only see the polls for the YA books and Original tales on the link I just posted!
Here is the one for the Adult novels!
https://www.goodreads.com/poll/show/1...
Can anyone suggest how to fix this?


message 28: by Melanti (new)

Melanti | 2125 comments Mod
Fixed. (It had to do with the poll not being featured. Featured polls are always listed before non-featured polls.


message 29: by Jalilah (new)

Jalilah | 4438 comments Mod
Melanti wrote: "Fixed. (It had to do with the poll not being featured. Featured polls are always listed before non-featured polls."

Home again! Thanks!


message 30: by Melanti (new)

Melanti | 2125 comments Mod
Our winning books are:
YA: Akata Witch
Adult (tie): Redemption in Indigo
Adult (tie): Will Do Magic for Small Change
Original: The People Could Fly: American Black Folktales


As a heads up to everyone, there's also a picture book of the titular story from the original collection: The People Could Fly: The Picture Book.
It seems all ebook editions are probably the stand alone work. Could everyone please check to see what editions their library has? If most people have the picture book version, we'd be better off focusing on just that one story rather than having to do the ILL.


message 31: by Leah (new)

Leah (flying_monkeys) | 1009 comments The copy my library has is the ISBN I nominated: The People Could Fly: American Black Folktales. Hopefully others can get it too.


message 32: by Rachel (new)

Rachel | 169 comments Melanti wrote: "As a heads up to everyone, there's also a picture book of the titular story from the original collection: The People Could Fly: The Picture Book.
It seems all ebook editions are probably the stand alone work. Could everyone please check to see what editions their library has? If most people have the picture book version, we'd be better off focusing on just that one story rather than having to do the ILL. "


I realize I'm a little late, but I have access to both copies. Looks like the group decided on the full copy?


message 33: by Melanti (new)

Melanti | 2125 comments Mod
Yep! Seems like most of us have access to the full copy.


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