Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness Brain on Fire discussion


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Brain on Fire ACTUAL Discussion

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message 1: by Mirkat (last edited Jan 09, 2018 04:39AM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Mirkat Every time I check book discussions, this poor book seems to have a spam post. Always supplements, for whatever reason.

Does anyone have an interested in actually discussing this book?

Edited to correct my error; "interesting" --> "interested."


Joan I read this several years ago. I forget a lot of books right after I finish but this stays with me. It shows how you must always advocate for yourself.


Mirkat It was astonishing (and infuriating) that doctors were assuming she must be a heavy drinker, even when she asserted that she only drank socially. It was like, "Oh, you're a young woman! Your symptoms must be your heavy alcohol consumption! Young women drink too much!"


Primero Fin Mirkat wrote: "Every time I check book discussions, this poor book seems to have a spam post. Always supplements, for whatever reason.

Does anyone have an interesting in actually discussing this book?"


I thought it was OK, nothing more. The medical mystery was interesting and I am thrilled the author survived.

But the fact that the author had no memory of most her ordeal gave the book a very odd tone. In many instances it was painfully obvious that the author was quoting word-for-word from the recollections of her family, friends, and coworkers. This made the book feel more like an extended news story - and not a first hand account of terrifying situation.


Mirkat Primero wrote: "In many instances it was painfully obvious that the author was quoting word-for-word from the recollections of her family, friends, and coworkers. This made the book feel more like an extended news story - and not a first hand account of terrifying situation. "

That's a good point, Primero. It was very much like a piece of investigative journalism where the subject happened to be herself.


Samantha Primero wrote: "But the fact that the author had no memory of most her ordeal gave the book a very odd tone. In many instances it was painfully obvious that the author was quoting word-for-word from the recollections of her family, friends, and coworkers. This made the book feel more like an extended news story - and not a first hand account of terrifying situation. "

I completely agree. For such an emotionally complex situation and experience, I never felt overwhelming emotions myself. Since the author herself was removed from the story, she ended up writing it in a way that made me as a reader feel somewhat removed.


Rossa Forbes I gave this book a five star rating. The memory gaps made it imperative that she interview people about a missing month of her life, which is pretty weird, but also works the way an investigative book should. As for the heavy drinker reference, that's the way a lot of doctors work. You mention that you like the occasional drink, and they automatically assume you are underreporting how much you do consume. Because that's what people typically do. They are embarrassed about admitting how much they do drink!


Mirkat Rossa wrote: "The memory gaps made it imperative that she interview people about a missing month of her life, which is pretty weird, but also works the way an investigative book should."

This did give the book an interesting angle. She was doing an investigation on herself, where she had to rely almost completely on others for her information.

"As for the heavy drinker reference, that's the way a lot of doctors work. You mention that you like the occasional drink, and they automatically assume you are underreporting how much you do consume. Because that's what people typically do. They are embarrassed about admitting how much they do drink! "

Which is a problem when the patient is being truthful, and heavy drinking is not what's going on....


Mari I reread this book almost every month, and I absolutely love it. It's just, magical. To me it feels kind of as if the deep and personal encounters made by her friends and family make up for the lack of the author's true inner feelings.


Aiyana Rosemary wrote: "I reread this book almost every month, and I absolutely love it. It's just, magical. To me it feels kind of as if the deep and personal encounters made by her friends and family make up for the lac..."

I know. It's a book that I would love to have on my bookshelf. Susannah was so brave in sharing her vulnerable struggles with this rare illness.


Mirkat I recently saw the movie version. I thought it was a decent adaptation.


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