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Book Suggestions > Booklist for bigots

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message 1: by Caitlin (new)

Caitlin Hyde | 8 comments Hi there!

I hope you are all having a wonderful holiday period! I love this time of year, especially as it's a chance to catch up with family. Unfortunately though, some of my relatives are not what you would call tolerant or open-minded. This has lead to some uncomfortable discussions (read: arguments). My grandpa actually told me the other day that women should not work or hold leadership positions because we have "off days". He is also very intolerant of different ethnicities and religions.

My grandpa is quite an intelligent man and can be very liberal when he feels like it. Like many people, he is a product of his time. So, instead of giving up on him, I have decided to set him a holiday reading list!

What books would you recommend for relatives that need to open their minds a bit?

Thanks!


message 2: by Gemma (new)

Gemma (gemmatombs) | 4 comments I'm currently reading A History of Britain in 21 Women by Jenni Murray, which is fascinating and I think thoroughly accessible. It's also easy to dip in and out of which means your grandfather might be willing to read it?


message 3: by Sarah (new)

Sarah (riotgirl678) | 1 comments Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's TED Talk 'We Should All Be Feminists' is an excellent starting point to provoke conversation and debate (or perhaps the printed version?).


message 4: by Pam (new)

Pam | 1080 comments Mod
And as a Kiwi, too. Which is fascinating to me, because you'll started the movement with allowing women to vote before anyone else did.

I would recommend "Hidden Figures" as it discusses the necessity of having of African American women helping in the space race. Takes place in 50's.

Some E books https://mch.govt.nz/news-events/press...


message 5: by Caitlin (new)

Caitlin Hyde | 8 comments Sarah wrote: "Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's TED Talk 'We Should All Be Feminists' is an excellent starting point to provoke conversation and debate (or perhaps the printed version?)."

I didn't realise they had printed versions of TED talks, that sounds like a great place to start, thanks!


message 6: by Caitlin (new)

Caitlin Hyde | 8 comments Pam wrote: "And as a Kiwi, too. Which is fascinating to me, because you'll started the movement with allowing women to vote before anyone else did.

I would recommend "Hidden Figures" as it discusses the neces..."


Sometimes I think thats part of the problem! We think we're so socially progressive that there's nothing left to fix. Denial of social issues in New Zealand is quite a big problem.

Hidden Figures is a great idea! My Grandpa would actually probably be really interested in that, thanks!


message 7: by Ana, Our Shared Shelf Moderator (new)

Ana PF | 746 comments Mod
If I may suggest something, it would be to keep it easy and accesible at the beginning. After all, he is your relative, he's also of a certain generation, which as you already noted makes it harder, and you wanna convince him slowly but surely, so that he'll find the need to open his mind by himself, and not 'brainwashed' by anyone else. :) Best of luck!


message 8: by Pam (last edited Dec 28, 2017 04:43PM) (new)

Pam | 1080 comments Mod
Ana wrote: "If I may suggest something, it would be to keep it easy and accesible at the beginning. After all, he is your relative, he's also of a certain generation, which as you already noted makes it harder..."

Excellent point. If possible Caitlin, read the book(s) too. Discuss it with him. Share things that caused an emotional response: anger, surprise, joy. Ask him questions. Etc etc.

This way, you two are creating a dialogue. You're understanding him as much as he is understanding you.


message 10: by Nyssa (new)

Nyssa | 11 comments Pam wrote: "If possible Caitlin, read the books too. Discuss it with him. Share things that caused an emotional response: anger, surprise, joy. Ask him questions. Etc etc.

This way, you two are creating a dialogue. You're understanding him as much as he is understanding you. "


This is an excellent suggestion!


message 11: by Ross (new)

Ross | 1444 comments use the OSS list seriously it is varied and shows the effect and what is being done about bigoted attitudes in the world.

Get him to sign up Caitlin that would be interesting and lead to some fascinating discussions


message 12: by MeerderWörter (new)

MeerderWörter | 2388 comments I think you need to approach this very subtle.
I think that some books that we have read here might be very good, such as My Life on the Road (but that might be a bit radical for him...)

You know what his hobbies are, try it that way. If he is very interested in science, pick books that are about female scientists, especially in areas that interest him a lot. That can be one way.

Another way is a bit more work, but I think might actually work quite well. Let him choose a book that you read together, and then you choose a book that you read together. And then discuss the books together. This way you can both open up to each other and you can learn something as well, I want to give that a try myself one day.

I wouldn't make it much about challenging one's views, that might end in something you don't want at all (especially considering he is your grandpa... old people are often not very keen on having their ideals they lived by for a lifetime being challenged)


message 13: by Caitlin (new)

Caitlin Hyde | 8 comments Emma wrote: "Do you think a bigot would be interested in reading these books if he/she knows it is to challenge his/her views?"


I think my Grandpa would, especially if it comes from me as we are very close. He loves learning, so I think if I approach if from that perspective, rather than "I'm trying to change your views", I might have a good shot.


message 14: by Caitlin (new)

Caitlin Hyde | 8 comments MeerderWörter wrote: "I think you need to approach this very subtle.
I think that some books that we have read here might be very good, such as My Life on the Road (but that might be a bit radical for him...)

You know ..."


I really like that idea! It sounds like a fun way to spend time with him too.


message 15: by Caitlin (new)

Caitlin Hyde | 8 comments Ross wrote: "use the OSS list seriously it is varied and shows the effect and what is being done about bigoted attitudes in the world.

Get him to sign up Caitlin that would be interesting and lead to some fas..."


I would love for him to sign up, but unfortunately he struggles to even use a cellphone! 😂


message 16: by Caitlin (new)

Caitlin Hyde | 8 comments Ana wrote: "If I may suggest something, it would be to keep it easy and accesible at the beginning. After all, he is your relative, he's also of a certain generation, which as you already noted makes it harder..."

Thanks! Thats really great advice :)


message 17: by MeerderWörter (new)

MeerderWörter | 2388 comments Caitlin wrote: "MeerderWörter wrote: "I think you need to approach this very subtle.
I think that some books that we have read here might be very good, such as My Life on the Road (but that might be a bit radical ..."


I wish I could do that with some of my relatives from time to time:)

I really hope that the two of you have this opportunity to learn from each other. It's a great one.


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