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Book Discussion > Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer

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message 1: by Brandon (new)

Brandon Nankivell | 31 comments Mod
689k ratings... What's the hype about? Let's find out. Share your thoughts on the book below.


message 2: by Brandon (new)

Brandon Nankivell | 31 comments Mod
Hi Guys - Hopefully you've made your way here after introducing yourself in the intro section (I've been reading your posts!). I'll be starting Into the Wild shortly and look forward to your thoughts on the book.


message 3: by Gian (new)

Gian Treinen (gianlucat) | 4 comments I've found it on archive(.)org. I m not 100 precent sure what this website about and if it's legal, but u gonna find the book for free there. hope i could help some of u

- What do u think about this website/ What do u think about to share books/ literature for free? (after the first few years, when the author made profit) -

(If this is the wrong spot for this stuff . . . pls delete it :) )


message 4: by Dominic (new)

Dominic | 4 comments Brandon wrote: "Hi Guys - Hopefully you've made your way here after introducing yourself in the intro section (I've been reading your posts!). I'll be starting Into the Wild shortly and look forward to your though..."

In my opinion the site seems legit, not leased due to the terms of agreement which only allows to use the content for scholarship and research purposes.
Nevertheless I would be careful.


message 5: by Dominic (new)

Dominic | 4 comments oops didn't intend to quote you Brandon


message 6: by Brandon (new)

Brandon Nankivell | 31 comments Mod
We're making discussion which is a great start but yes we want to keep discussion relevant to the book. I will create a new thread for general discussion!


message 7: by Kaushik (last edited Jan 05, 2018 01:59PM) (new)

Kaushik Choudhury | 4 comments "Some readers admired the boy immensely for his courage and noble ideals; others fulminated that he was a reckless idiot, a wacko, a narcissist who perished out of arrogance and stupidity—and was undeserving of the considerable media attention he received." - This opening line in the Author's note invites the readers to judge and make an individual opinion about Chris.

Do you agree?


message 8: by Brandon (new)

Brandon Nankivell | 31 comments Mod
@Kaushik I don't mind that the author invites us to judge because we will make our own judgment regardless of whether the author invites us or not! Only a few pages through and I had instantly connected with the protagonist. Whilst I have great empathy for him, I'm yet to make a reasonable judgment on his actions. I resume reading...


message 9: by Kaushik (new)

Kaushik Choudhury | 4 comments @Brandon - I read around 30% of the book until now and indeed I am also struggling to make a judgement. about Chris - I guess this is the beauty of Mr Krakauer's writing, keeps you engaged and guessing. Tolstoy, Thoreau and Marx can be misunderstood and taken out of context by people.

One thing which really struck me until now is that everyone with whom came across liked him and have goods words for him.

Let me see what holds in further pages ...


message 10: by Brandon (new)

Brandon Nankivell | 31 comments Mod
Kaushik wrote: "@Brandon - I read around 30% of the book until now and indeed I am also struggling to make a judgement. about Chris - I guess this is the beauty of Mr Krakauer's writing, keeps you engaged and gues..."

That fact that most people seem to like him thus far. Maybe because Alex's actions reflect their own desires that they're too afraid to bring to the surface? We'll see :P


message 11: by Jakob (new)

Jakob | 6 comments A well-written book in my opinion. I like that the author has put in many storys about people with similar lives to McCandles's and about the people whom he met. Also the research that the author has done gives good explanations about things otherwise unknown to the reader.

Its a sad story and a happy-ish story (exept the unfortunate starvation and death) at the same time. When reading about the things that Cris said and did I found myself wondering what would have he done after leaving Alaska. I believe that he was a person who may have started a global nature/food movement or something like that.

Somehow by reading this book I found out new things about myself. Also I feel that I have a different look on the world than I had before reading this book.

Thank you, Brandon, for recommending this book. l'ill be waiting for the next one.


message 12: by NikhilTheReader (new)

NikhilTheReader | 3 comments Starting the year with this amazing book. I am half way through the book and the thing I love most about the same is that i really connect with the main character.


message 13: by Brandon (new)

Brandon Nankivell | 31 comments Mod
NikhilTheReader wrote: "Starting the year with this amazing book. I am half way through the book and the thing I love most about the same is that i really connect with the main character."

How so Nikhil?


message 14: by NikhilTheReader (new)

NikhilTheReader | 3 comments The main Protagonist is a book lover and is influenced by ideas. Believes in a minimalistic lifestyle. He ponders deeply over his existence and believes there is more to life than what meets the eye. And some lines even hint that the guy is into nofap ( I.e he values many things above the gratification of sexual desires ) . And he loves to run as is told by her sister. And many other qualities make me relate to Chris J. Maccandless.


message 15: by Brandon (new)

Brandon Nankivell | 31 comments Mod
Finished the book. Here's my brief review.

I enjoyed it. Like many, I felt I could relate to McCandless only he took things to the extreme. I find it difficult to blame him for putting himself in a life-threatening situation. When you're in an existential frame-of-mind, mighty expeditions 'pull you' into them. They feel like your only choice. I know this based on my experience of leaving my girlfriend in Australia for 2 months on an impromptu solo trip to Thailand where I lived with buddhist monks. I have no regrets despite her telling me she felt it was too abrupt for her to prepare. Maybe I would if I were on the verge of dying? Or maybe not.


message 16: by RLSI (new)

RLSI | 2 comments In reading other reviews or opinions on this book on Goodreads (not on this group page) there is a lot of criticism on the story. Since this is non-fiction, the story is the story. I don’t understand the idea of liking/disliking the story. You can like or dislike the author’s writing style and his ability to tell the story, you can even like/dislike Chris McCandless himself; but, the story is what it is.

The fact that I liked this book as much as I do surprises me as this isn’t the type of book that would pique my interest. Mr. Krakauer’s writing style is near-perfect. He never repeats himself. Every thought is new, every metaphor expertly crafted and every adjective well placed. The words he chooses are intentional and meaningful and always sets the scene or advances the story. Never did I find myself thinking “Oh jeez, he said that already. When is he going to find something new to say?” This is definitely the type of book that I’m going to have to read again as I’m sure there is much that I have missed on the first read.

I like Chris McCandless a lot despite the fact that I am a parent and I have a lot of empathy for what the McCandless family went through. I admire McCandless’ discipline, his adaptability, and his dedication in finding himself.

I think Mr. Krakauer is correct in thinking McCandless likely was on course to “abandon the life of a solitary vagabond, stop running so hard from intimacy, and become a member of the human community,” (Page 188). Look at the difference in theme between McCandless’ letter to Ron Franz and his margin notes found in the Alaskan Bus.

Letter from McCandless to Franz
“You are wrong if you think Joy emanates only or principally from human relationships. God has placed it all around us. It is in everything and anything we might experience. We just have to have the courage to turn against our habitual lifestyle and engage in unconventional living.” (Page 58)

Margin Notes in Dr. Zhivago
“HAPPINESS IS ONLY REAL WHEN SHARED.” (Page 188)

Finally, my favorite line of the book is on page 154: “…I was a raw youth who mistook passion for insight.” I don’t, yet, know how to articulate why this resonates with me. I am certainly not male, or even close to “raw youth,” but since I have read those words, I have been ruminating on them.


message 17: by Gian (new)

Gian Treinen (gianlucat) | 4 comments ok I m not all the way through yet, but like the other people here i feel a bit connected to him as well. But there is one thing, that is bothering in my mind. In the book they told us, that he isn't connected to his family cause of family issues. But i think the main reason is, that his parents stand for the typical social life with cars, money, a house , so on u know what i mean. And he can't identify himself with the society. He see' s all the problem and don t ignore them like most of the people do. To find his place, where and how he fits in this world(and make experiences), he started his journey. To experience this trip to the fullest, he stoped his contact to his parents. So that there is a) no one who remember him active to this lifestyle and hold him back (clear mind) on a mental base . . . someone who told s him he shouldn't t do stuff like that . . . and b) no one that try s to stop him from "stupid" ideas, like going alone to alska. (in a active way) What do you think?


message 18: by Brandon (new)

Brandon Nankivell | 31 comments Mod
Gian wrote: "ok I m not all the way through yet, but like the other people here i feel a bit connected to him as well. But there is one thing, that is bothering in my mind. In the book they told us, that he isn..."

Mostly agree, although I feel like he didn't stop contact with his parents to make the trip 'the fullest', but rather the significance of family and their way in society dropped beneath him and so going his own way alone felt like his only choice. So that's what he did.


message 19: by Bill (new)

Bill | 1 comments I identify with Chris more than I'd like to admit. I was once callow and reckless, and in a lot of ways, I still am. I'm sad that I didn't do more crazy things when the whole world seemed so new and exciting to me.

I want to point out a documentary you guys might not know about that adds a dimension to the story.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pVHQV...

It's a documentary based on Chris' sister's book. The father and mother are interviewed. The father seems a lot more psychopathy than one would have thought. It's eye opening.


message 20: by Gian (new)

Gian Treinen (gianlucat) | 4 comments I had a hard time to understand how a bookclub really works. So i thought about this book again and two things come into my mind i want to talk about.
1. We talked about, what we learned through this book. After finished reading i started to listened to other people and tried to don't judge their opinion, like Chris did. i think this is a big thing we could learn from him and is underestimated.
2. A pretty big part of the book is about how he is different from other people, who want to do extreme experience to find themself. Why is this so important? I mean everyone is the main character in his life and every story is kind of unique. cool --- have a nice day <3


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