Drood Drood discussion


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Emily In the beginning of Drood, Collins makes a reference to a follower of Dickens as having a "lean and hungry look" like Iago. Having taught Julius Caesar to sophomores in high school for several years, I know it was Cassius, not Iago in Othello, that had a lean and hungry look. Is Simmons totally wrong or is this an element of Wilkie Collins' character to misquote Shakespeare?


Zulfiya I know it comes too late as a suggestion, but the whole book is based on the idea that Wilkie Collins is such an unreliable first person narrator. It might be a deliberate mistake to show the foggy mind of the person who indulged himself too much with the opium. But it might be a Simmons' misquote as well. Because I tend to idolize intelligent and crafty writers like Simmons, I would say it was a deliberate mistake to show that you can not trust Collins in this novel, especially taking into the account the whole plot of the novel proves that Wilkie Collins is biased Salieri :-) I greatly enjoyed the book. I hope you feel likewise


Emily Thanks Zulfiya. The more I read the book, the more I realized that this was certainly part of the character. I loved Drood - found it to be fascinating! Wilkie Collins is indeed a Salieri in the novel.


Zulfiya Drood is truly a fascinating book. I love it for the original ideas, for the lush pseudo-Victorian language, interesting plot, unusual perspective on Dickens' novels, thorough research, and for some undefinable feeling also known as the vintage pleasure of reading.


Chris I eventually got so bored with this book, it took me months to finally slog to the end. I thought the premise was great. I think the analogy to Salieri is spot on. I understand Simmons was writing in the wordy style of the times - I still think the book would have been much better with about 300 pages cut out.


Meghann I agree. I really liked the premise of the book, but it also took me months to get through. There were many sections that I found interesting, but there were just as many that were long and drawn out. This is the only Simmons book I have read. For those of you that have read more of his work, is he worth another try????


Chris He writes a wide variety of stuff, including sci fi and fantasy, so I wouldn't judge him just by this. I lot of people really liked his book "The Terror" about the John Franklin expedition to the Arctic. I read his "The Crook Factory" a fictionalized account of Ernest Hemingway's time in Cuba and it was OK.


Genia Lukin I think that Simmons, considering his literati tendencies, could hardly have confused his Shakespeare.

His usual way of work is to take a slice of literature and create science fiction iterations of it. He has a four-book series based off of Keats' work, a two-book set with premises dealing with the Iliad and the Odyssey (both these series, by the way, are superb) and this novel, which, in my opinion, is probably his weakest effort, based on Dickens' and Collins' work.

I hope that answers some of the questions.


SandChigger This book and The Terror are the only two of his horror books I've read so far (enjoyed both a lot, btw), but his science fiction is excellent. (With one horrific exception.) His Ilium is the first thing of his I read and it's fantastic. (The sequel, Olympos, was one of those "WTF was he thinking?!" head-scratchers. For me at least.) The Hyperion/Endymion tetralogy falls off a bit as it proceeds, but is still worth the effort.


Allison White I was so excited to read this book. I am a huge fan of Wilkie Collins and Dickens and was just chomping at the bit to get started. I ended up stalling at around 100 pages. I don't know what it was but I just could not get into this book. I kept going hoping it would catch my interest but finally gave up. It's the first book I haven't finished since I was a child. I have kept the book with the hopes that it was my mood or some other reason that made it such a chore. I will try again at some point, your reviews give me hope!


Steve Chaput Good luck, Allison. I tried to get through DROOD twice and never made it much past the half-way point. I found I just didn't care enough to keep slogging through it. I was really disppointed, since I love Dickens and have read several other books that discuss his unfinished novel. Also, like some others here admit it was the first book by Simmons I had ever read and after this I doubt I'll try another.


message 12: by Paul (new) - rated it 3 stars

Paul I am sure the error is intentional.


message 13: by Nick (new) - rated it 5 stars

Nick It's a shame so many people seem to be failing to get through this one (i've heard much the same said about Quicksilver, by Neal Stephenson).

The real shame is that the ending is so excellent. It's beautifully ambiguous and completely in fitting with the sort of work the two authors in question did.


Chris Having read Simmons Carrion Comfort, The Terror, Hyperion & Fall of Hyperion I don't think Drood is anywhere near those books in terms of quality, it's still OK though. I have recommended all of his other books but I won't be recommending Drood.
In fact if Drood hadn't been written by an author I have previously enjoyed then I'm pretty sure I would have given up on it too.


message 15: by Nick (new) - rated it 5 stars

Nick I quite enjoyed the Terror, possibly more so than Drood, but never really warmed to Hyperion and the fact that it ends with pretty much nothing resolved didn't do much to improve that. I much preferred Drood.


Jonathan The Terror was the first book I read by Simmons, and I enjoyed it immensely. Drood didn't quite jump out at me as something I'd be interested in at first glance, but the more I thought on it, I was intrigued, mainly to see what level of immersion Simmons would provide -- given how intensely researched and thorough The Terror was. I'm glad I gave it a second chance.


Chris Nick wrote: "I quite enjoyed the Terror, possibly more so than Drood, but never really warmed to Hyperion and the fact that it ends with pretty much nothing resolved didn't do much to improve that. I much pref..."

You should definitely give Fall of Hyperion a go as it gives you the closure that you don't get from Hyperion, I'm sure they were actually intended as one book.
Endymion and Rise of Endymion are on my to read list for the near future but you could quite easily stop after Fall of Hyperion.


message 18: by Nick (new) - rated it 5 stars

Nick I've got it to read, just haven't wanted to yet. I think I was expecting more from Hyperion going in, given how much hype it has gotten over the years. It wasn't a bad book by any measure, and when I get over the initial disappointment i'm sure i'll give the next one a go ;)


Tomerobber Nick wrote: "I quite enjoyed the Terror, possibly more so than Drood, but never really warmed to Hyperion and the fact that it ends with pretty much nothing resolved didn't do much to improve that. I much pref..."
I just finished DROOD a few weeks ago . . . but I thought the ending was weak and didn't resolve the issues raised in the storyline. It DID peak my interest enough to want to take a second look at Dickens (with the celebration of his 200th birthday this year as well) . . and I'm now reading several biographies of him . . . and I've downloaded an audiobook of his as well. I've read other books by Simmons and have enjoyed them . . and I have had THE TERROR in my TBR pile for some time.


The Terror by Dan Simmons Drood by Dan Simmons by Dan Simmons Dan Simmons


message 20: by Robert (new)

Robert Palmer Nick wrote: "It's a shame so many people seem to be failing to get through this one (i've heard much the same said about Quicksilver, by Neal Stephenson).

Quicksilver is nothing like this book. It's huge, yes, but the plotting is much tighter, the tale much vaster (so the mass of the thing is actually justified), and the characters are incredible and interesting (not unlikeable and overinflated).


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Books mentioned in this topic

The Terror (other topics)
Drood (other topics)

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Dan Simmons (other topics)