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message 1: by Tiff (new)

Tiff Wasley | 4 comments Mod
We all have that book that we LOVE and want everyone to have the chance to read it! This is the place where you can tell us all about it.

Let us know a bit about the book as well as the title and author. That way everyone can have a look in here for their next read and find something they know will be good!

This gives us all a place to find some books to read outside of the book club. Because lets face it, we all have more than one book on the go at any one time!


message 2: by nil (new)

nil (nilnil) One of my all-time favs is The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle by Haruki Murakami. I find it really difficult to describe because there is so much that is surreal in this book, but if you do enjoy magical realism and postmodern literature, this is definitely up your alley. I think it is time for a re-read, if anyone wants to be book "penpals". :)


message 3: by Ashley (new)

Ashley | 43 comments The Circle by Dave Eggers.

Mae Holland, feels stuck in her small town home with her cubical job that is stuck in an era long past. All that changes when her best friend lands her an interview at The Circle - the leading technology company in the world. The Circle is everything Mae's been dreaming of and more. With amazing benefits that allow her to get her MS father the treatment he needs, her best friend holding one of the highest positions short of being a founder, and an amazing social community. To top it all off, she is the best newbie the company has ever seen. Life at The Circle is a dream. Except for the mysterious lover meeting her in secret. He claims to work at The Circle as well and present at all the parties, but she can't find him in The Circle's databases anywhere. As her life gets more involved with The Circle and its belief that no knowledge - of any kind - should ever be withheld from anyone, her family and the people she knew back home start distancing themselves, not wanting to be caught up in the bubble of total lack of privacy Mae has immersed herself into.

I'm not the best at writing synopsis, so I hope that works.

I have been obsessed with this book since I read it in August. It's an amazing story looking at society's obsession with social media and how that obsession leads to our willingly giving up our privacy. It also looks at how easy it is to get lost behind an idea, a leader, a leader's idea, and become blinded to everything else.

Most of you have probably heard about the movie, and most of the time I'm not a fan of the movie adaptations when they stray from the book's events, but I actually do like and really appreciate the movie's take on the book. However, I do believe this is a story you would benefit from both reading the book and watching the movie (if you so chose to watch the movie) because it gives you a better insight into what is going on. The movie tends to skim over some details that aren't needed for the movie's flow, but are needed for a deeper understanding of the story itself.

Hope other people enjoy the story as much as I did!


message 4: by nil (new)

nil (nilnil) Ashley wrote: "The Circle by Dave Eggers.

Mae Holland, feels stuck in her small town home with her cubical job that is stuck in an era long past. All that changes when her best friend lands her an interview at T..."


I added it to my list, though my luck with Dave Eggers is sort of a tossup. :) Thanks for your suggestion!


message 5: by Maggie (new)

Maggie Holt (maggie_holt) I've never been able to pick a favorite in my life, so writing about that ONE BOOK is near impossible. Instead, I'll mention two!

If you are willing to tackle a tome of a book, I'm sure everyone has at least HEARD of Brandon Sanderson. His third book in the Stormlight Archives comes out this month, and I could not be more excited for it. It's one of the best series I've read in my life.

But if you don't have the time for a 50 hour audio book (or three) or 1000+ page novels, then my OTHER recommendation is The Memoirs of Lady Trent (also a series, but a much smaller one). It's about a woman in a Victorian-esque era who is obsessed with studying dragons during a time when women did not do things like study dragons. It is an absolute delight and I can't say enough good things about it.


message 6: by S (new)

S Michaels (maddadamm) | 3 comments The Castaway King Chronicles: Afer The Dark

Great book! ^

Also has anyone else read The Book of Flying?


message 7: by RJ (new)

RJ  (gioiabookninja) | 3 comments Malobee wrote: "One of my all-time favs is The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle by Haruki Murakami. I find it really difficult to describe because there is so much that is surreal in this book, but if you do enjoy magical r..."

I love Haruki Murakami! I have yet to read The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle. Still reading 1Q84. (:


message 8: by nil (last edited Nov 30, 2017 07:50AM) (new)

nil (nilnil) RJ wrote: "Malobee wrote: "One of my all-time favs is The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle by Haruki Murakami. I find it really difficult to describe because there is so much that is surreal in this book, but if you do..."

I enjoyed 1Q84, but I didn't know I was going to until the end. I love a lot of Murakami's work, but I did find that reading through most of his works there are a lot of common themes that can get a little bit repetitive. I loved and would highly recommend WUBC, Kafka on the Shore, Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World, A Wild Sheep Chase (this is a part of a trilogy, but when I read it the first two were not available in English, and weren't until 2015!) , and Norwegian Wood (in that order). In contrast I absolutely LOATHED Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki.

With all of them (including 1Q84 is that it took an exceptionally long time for the floaty, dreamy detail to all coalesce into a whole picture. 1Q84 just took much, much longer due to sheer length. hehe


message 9: by Casi (new)

Casi Hamilton | 2 comments Wizard of the Grove by Tanya Huff

I first read this book when I was maybe 15 or 16. I am 35 now and in all that time no other book has knocked it out of the number one spot on my best books list. It's two books in one with some really great world building and utterly enjoyable characters. There is a version of Death in this book that is my favorite of any incarnation I've ever seen of the character, yes, even better than Gaiman's. I can't speak high enough about this book. Please go read it.


message 10: by Ester (new)

Ester Litago Rabasco (estercristinanoelia) | 85 comments "The Perfume" Patrick Süskind


message 11: by Kristina (new)

Kristina | 48 comments Fairies and co, I am in need of help. ASAP.

I just read the saddest book ever. (Eleanor and Park, if you’re interested.) My heart is hurting and I’d love a quick, easy, upbeat book to return my faith in life and love and basically everything happy and good.

Thanks, troops. You may be dismissed.


message 12: by Ninitha (Niko) (new)

Ninitha (Niko) | 40 comments Mod
A happy book.. let's see..hmmm..omg why can I coming up blank.. not necessarily a happy book but try 'Ready Player One', it's not about love and happiness but it will be a fast paced distraction. That I can guarantee.


message 13: by Ashley (new)

Ashley | 43 comments Ninitha: I'm actually reading Ready Player One right now, so funny you should bring that one up.

Kristine: Artemis is pretty upbeat if you haven't read it yet. from the view point of a sassy teenager. it's pretty entertaining. The Wish List is younger reading level, but a good story.


message 14: by Kristina (new)

Kristina | 48 comments Thanks, loves.

I went with a familiar and comfortable voice with Nick Hornby. I haven’t read Funny Girl yet so now seemed like a pretty good time to check it off the list.


message 15: by Cordelia (new)

Cordelia (cordeliareads) | 324 comments Mod
I just finished 84 CHARING CROSS ROAD and really. Anyone who loves books and/or London and has a sense of humour SHOULD READ THIS BOOK!!!


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