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Sonnets > Sonnet #146, Week 37 (October 30)

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message 1: by Candy (new)

Candy | 2595 comments Mod
Poor soul, the centre of my sinful earth,
... ... ... these rebel powers that thee array
Why dost thou pine within and suffer dearth,
Painting thy outward walls so costly gay?
Why so large cost, having so short a lease,
Dost thou upon thy fading mansion spend?
Shall worms, inheritors of this excess,
Eat up thy charge? Is this thy body's end?
Then soul, live thou upon thy servant's loss,
And let that pine to aggravate thy store;
Buy terms divine in selling hours of dross;
Within be fed, without be rich no more:
So shall thou feed on Death, that feeds on men,
And Death once dead, there's no more dying then.


message 2: by Candy (new)

Candy | 2595 comments Mod
Didn't Shakespeare answer these questions in the Sonnet we read week 14...the first Sonnet?

https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...

I'm not at all sure that when I read the Sonnet #1 it even occurred to me that it was the first sonnet and how interesting that although the series of poems have been randomly generated....we had the first sonnet relatively early on in this experiment. And I don't think I thought about it being the introduction or first sonnet.

I'm pretty sure it was not written first and it was written later in the project in order to open the experience and direct the reader into the "plot" of the sonnets.

I feel here we see in Sonnet #146 the existential concerns and repeated motifs of desire, age, time and life challenging a self-aware person into wondering what's it all about.

This is such a VANITAS....

Were't we directed as youth to increase and wasn't the original youth portrayed as self-centered...aware of their youth vitality and beauty....so they should create more life to add to life?

I have begun to wonder if the soulful, romantic sensitive person I have projected onto Shakespeare might actually have been a very narscistic young man....who believed he had a right to early sex, desire and that he thought very highly of himself. I always thought that Shakespeare developed total cads of young men because he was so sensitive to women and their emotions that he observed conceited oblivious men to teach those same men about life.

It's recently occurred to me during the reading of these sonnets...that actually it's much more practical that Shakespeare has portrayed his own self in those young men....that he had to grow up to become a man that I might admire or believe or fantasize that I think Shakespeare was a mensch....but it's occurred to me he may not have been so as a young man.

This sonnet seems so wise as to the kind of emotions a person who is very beautiful and precious might feel once they begin to feel the burden of time and age.

It's as if the person....my imaginary Shakespeare was gifted with personality, charm, devilish good looks....and believed he could write....I sense he was almost like a con artist...he saw human emotion and knew how to produce stories that would blow an audiences mind....and found power. Bt later...as he ages...he realizes what an ass he has been....how life is decay for real....it starts to infuse his life.


message 3: by Janice (JG) (new)

Janice (JG) Candy wrote: "It's as if the person....my imaginary Shakespeare was gifted with personality, charm, devilish good looks....and believed he could write....I sense he was almost like a con artist...he saw human emotion and knew how to produce stories that would blow an audiences mind....and found power. Bt later...as he ages...he realizes what an ass he has been....how life is decay for real....it starts to infuse his life..."

"Buy terms divine in selling hours of dross;
Within be fed, without be rich no more:"

I like your description of the maturing S. But do not despair, because I think he became more and more enlightened with time and maybe even younger than we'd think of middle age... So much happened for him so quickly when he was very young, I'm sure it all went to his head for a while. But S is above all else capable of self-examination, and while fame had him peaking with hubris at some point, I don't think it took him too very long before he saw its corrupting ways. Remember middle age was in the 30s.


message 4: by Candy (new)

Candy | 2595 comments Mod
I wonder ow people during the Renaissance said "middle aged". Did they say it? It's very difficult to google that...because of course there are "The Middle Ages." Did people call medieval times, the 1200's The Middle Age...when did that become an adage or "historically correct" thought process? Ha!


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