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World & Current Events > Are cemeteries necessary?

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message 1: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13426 comments It's not a secret that many places on the globe are running out of burial space: http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-31837964 . Damn, some parts of the world lack space even for living members of the community..
Many believe that a soul has some further destiny, but none connect it with the graveyard.
The corpses disintegrate anyway.
Very few visit graves of relatives beyond 2-3 generation back.
In the light of the above, are graveyards necessary or maybe we'll have e-graves eventually to commemorate for those who care about a deceased?
What do you think?


message 2: by Michel (new)

Michel Poulin I think that a better, more ecological way to remember our loved ones would be to keep their ashes in engraved urns, either at home or in some family property. That would save a tremendous amount of precious land that would then be free for other purposes.

Some remains would still need to be accessible to the public, like those of national heroes or of soldiers that fell in wars. In those cases, instead of covering many square kilometers with headstones, why not incinerate the bodies and then put the ashes in engraved urns that would be exposed in publicly accessible galeries? That way, we all could honor those heroes at will while saving more precious lands.


message 3: by Justin (new)

Justin (justinbienvenue) Cemeteries and golf courses take up so much land and yet we still have homeless people..


message 4: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9464 comments One thing that has happened here occasionally is that after sufficient time, the headstones have been removed and the area converted to a park. In my opinion, this is not a bad idea because as cities grow, we tend to run out of recreational area for the young and not so young.


message 5: by J.J. (last edited Oct 23, 2017 04:10AM) (new)

J.J. Mainor | 2144 comments Nik wrote: "Very few visit graves of relatives beyond 2-3 generation back...."
It may not be the kind of visit you imagine, but a lot of people find old graveyards strangely interesting. There's something about walking among the graves and looking at headstones of people who lived a hundred, two hundred, maybe even three hundred years ago. It's sort of a more personal way to connect with the past...thinking about people who lived history rather than the cold events themselves.

When I lived in Rhode Island, there were a lot of old, forgotten, or historical cemeteries. There was one I remember, a small lot, largely forgotten and overgrown, and probably no one cared to see it, but when I was in the Boy Scouts, we would clean it up every couple years just to keep it from being forgotten. Also in the Scouts, there was a property just across the border in Connecticut where we would go camping, and there was another such old cemetery within walking distance. It was a lot cleaner and better maintained, but still older and somberly interesting.

We had another, active cemetery just a couple miles from where I grew up where my immediate family was buried, including a large family plot going back to a set of 2nd great grandparents with the most recent being a pair of uncles who both died at 3 years old. To me, these people are just names, but there's something weird about thinking I'm related, and I have to admit one year planting flowers in the little urns on the sides of the headstones just because.

https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg...

And yes, Annie Arnold is related to "that" Arnold...Benedict is my 2nd cousin 9 times removed. And not just through one grandparent, but both maternal grandparents. They were something like 5th cousins linked through the Arnold family. :D


message 6: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5332 comments People have their own ideas about cemeteries, and that's fine with me. My mom believes that, according to the Bible, people will rise from their graves when Jesus returns. Have you ever noticed that, in Christian countries, graves in cemeteries face to the east? It's because the Bible says that in the end times, Christ will come from the east. I would never tell her that I want to be cremated and have my ashes scattered on the ocean. Cemeteries are necessary for some people, not for others.


message 7: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9464 comments I think also if someone wants some ending and has died, you cannot under any circumstances try to persuade those left behind too change it. There is far too much grief, and a person should have their last wishes honoured.


message 8: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13426 comments Until the immortality is fully clinically tested and approved by the FDA, FAA and other relevant authorities, the alleged overpopulation has some far-reaching side effects. Do you think the traditional burial will survive, allowing for some people buying their slots in advance, or do you think ex-humans will be treated differently in the future?


message 9: by Holly (new)

Holly (goldikova) I'm one of those people who love cemeteries. They are more peaceful and relaxing than any park, and we frequently see wildlife; whitetail deer, wild turkeys and foxes when we visit. In our town there is an old section with some wonderful elaborate Victorian era monuments. Because I live in a farm community, the land set aside for a cemetery is very hilly and on a bicycle you can get a real roller coaster simulation that's a lot of fun.

I don't want to be buried in a cemetery, but I do find them beautiful and peaceful.

Also, there are some cemeteries, such as Highgate in London, which would be considered historic sites and preserved for that reason.

There is no shortage of land around here.


message 10: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9464 comments The prediction is that many cemeteries around here will end up under water if sea level rises occur. Others, where nobody visits any longer, have had their headstones removed and the area turned into a park, with a small memorial site in a corner. If you watch archaeology programs you will see a lot of ancient graves have been forgotten, and now dug up again for artefacts. Don't get buried with "things" :-)


message 11: by Rita (new)

Rita Chapman | 152 comments People who place flowers and crosses along the roadside where loved ones have died should remember what a cemetery is for!


message 12: by Justin (new)

Justin (justinbienvenue) Maybe they'll make graveyards on asteroids or small planets like in that one Twilight Zone where everyone is frozen.


message 13: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13426 comments Rita wrote: "People who place flowers and crosses along the roadside where loved ones have died should remember what a cemetery is for!"

The discussion here is in no way intended to undermine memorials or personal feelings of loss and grief.


message 14: by Rita (new)

Rita Chapman | 152 comments Of course not - but there is a place for everything.


message 15: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9464 comments I saw a TV program on the mideast, and as something of an aside it showed the cemetery at Karbala, which is apparently the largest in the world. It has been the only cemetery there for over a thousand years and it covers many hectares. I suppose in some ways, since it seemed to be the desert, land was not a problem there.


message 16: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5332 comments Not necessary, but desired by many, although I don't really get that.


message 17: by Graeme (new)

Graeme Rodaughan | 7210 comments In a Soylent Green scenario, cemeteries become a type of delicatessen...


message 18: by Graeme (new)

Graeme Rodaughan | 7210 comments Justin wrote: "Maybe they'll make graveyards on asteroids or small planets like in that one Twilight Zone where everyone is frozen."

Sounds expensive.

Perhaps in the future, bodies will be thrown into a giant hopper, ground through multiple threshing wheels, and turned in to a fine powder that is used to feed hydroponic farms.

All done under the auspices of a 'waste not, want not,' program.


message 19: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5332 comments I may be mistaken, but I don't think cemeteries came into it.


message 20: by Regina (new)

Regina Tula (wwwgoodreadscomuser_providence) | 14 comments Graeme wrote: "In a Soylent Green scenario, cemeteries become a type of delicatessen..."
Haha Yes, they are a delicatessen of stories of undone secrets.


message 21: by Regina (new)

Regina Tula (wwwgoodreadscomuser_providence) | 14 comments J.J. wrote: "Nik wrote: "Very few visit graves of relatives beyond 2-3 generation back...."
It may not be the kind of visit you imagine, but a lot of people find old graveyards strangely interesting. There's so..."


Love find a grave. Amazing when you are looking for ancestors or even celebrities for those who care about such things.


message 22: by J.J. (new)

J.J. Mainor | 2144 comments Regina wrote: "J.J. wrote: "Nik wrote: "Very few visit graves of relatives beyond 2-3 generation back...."
It may not be the kind of visit you imagine, but a lot of people find old graveyards strangely interestin..."


I know. I love being able to see the graves of ancestors who lived and died in other parts of the country. Kind of makes you feel closer even if you're not there.


message 23: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5332 comments I'd rather be cremated and have my ashes scattered, or even be buried in a pine box without being embalmed than to molder away, embalmed, in a sealed casket, which seems creepy and unnatural.


message 24: by J.J. (new)

J.J. Mainor | 2144 comments Scout wrote: "I'd rather be cremated and have my ashes scattered, or even be buried in a pine box without being embalmed than to molder away, embalmed, in a sealed casket, which seems creepy and unnatural."
The second is becoming a new trend called "green" burial. Honestly, like you, I like the idea.


message 25: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13426 comments In our small and very crammed country they started building low-rise buildings for burial purposes. When there is low-rise, high-rise is just behind the corner. Won't be surprised to see sky-scrapers full of graves at some point


message 26: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5332 comments Oh, grisly structures.


message 27: by Marie (new)

Marie | 562 comments Where I live in Florida the Veterans National Cemetery has buildings called "Columbarium" for cremated remains of your loved one. They are very well maintained throughout the year. My father is in one of those buildings. The cemetery is surrounded by a forest and property, so for now they have not run out of room for graves.

The last time I was there which was few months ago they had taken in a little more territory for more graves. As far as the Columbarium buildings, they have about five or six of them in the cemetery, but they are not all together. They have them situated in certain parts of the cemetery.

I am not sure that all veteran cemeteries have the Columbarium buildings, but since they are national, I would assume that they all have them.


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