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Eco-Fiction > The Guardian highlights climate fiction. Is this a thing?

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message 1: by J.G. (last edited Oct 18, 2017 07:20PM) (new)

J.G. Follansbee (joe_follansbee) | 21 comments Readers of The Guardian may have seen this article describing the emerging genre of climate fiction . Do you think this is a thing? Or a reworking of older genres?


message 2: by Robert (new)

Robert Zwilling | 1976 comments I would say it is a reworking of a theme that has been around since the 60s. The difference might be that some of the stories of today are about prevention while back in the 60's the stories took the line that the damage and changes had already happened.


message 3: by J.G. (new)

J.G. Follansbee (joe_follansbee) | 21 comments Robert wrote: "I would say it is a reworking of a theme that has been around since the 60s. The difference might be that some of the stories of today are about prevention while back in the 60's the stories took t..."

Interesting. Do you have an example or two of a story about prevention?


message 4: by Robert (new)

Robert Zwilling | 1976 comments I would say stories without a whole lot of destruction that reshapes our way of thinking about daily happenings would be under the heading of prevention.

Birdbrain by Virginia Arthur,
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2...

Summer Wings by April Tremblay
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2...

Green Valley, by Anne Ipsen
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/3...

Mercedes Wore Black, by Andrea Brunais
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2...

The Erenwine Agenda, by Maia Kumari Gilman
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/3...


message 5: by Brian (new)

Brian Burt | 426 comments Mod
Personally, I believe there is momentum building around "climate fiction" that crosses traditional genre boundaries, but that labels are less important than content and theme. In fact, we've had some other Green Group discussions around this in years past, in case anyone's interested:

Green Group -- Climate Change -- Cli-Fi Article


message 6: by Tanja (new)

Tanja (tanjarohinibisgaard) | 3 comments Brian wrote: "Personally, I believe there is momentum building around "climate fiction" that crosses traditional genre boundaries, but that labels are less important than content and theme. In fact, we've had so..."

Thanks for posting this - very interesting! I agree that the label in itself is not important. In my opinion, what's important is what the story is about. And I think it is important that there are good stories that readers want to read, that also are about important topics such as climate change - and how are we going to handle that - how will our future look like - and what are the live of future generation going to look like!


message 7: by Clare (last edited Jun 24, 2018 05:15AM) (new)

Clare O'Beara | 5926 comments Mod
Science fiction has long taken this theme - often set on other worlds, which gave the author a free hand. Like Dune, a tale of clashing personalities set on an arid world with highly adapted wildlife and people.

Dune
Dune (Dune Chronicles, #1) by Frank Herbert
In other cases the natural environment is destroyed by alien invaders, or sometimes by expanding human population.

The Caves of Steel
The Caves of Steel (Robot #1) by Isaac Asimov

Kim Stanley Robinson shows that Earth becomes so overpopulated that we have no choice but to terraform Mars enough to live on, in his famous Mars trilogy.

Blue Mars (Mars Trilogy, #3) by Kim Stanley Robinson
Green Mars (Mars Trilogy, #2) by Kim Stanley Robinson


message 8: by Clare (new)

Clare O'Beara | 5926 comments Mod
I have just spotted a climate fiction thriller called Tipping Point among a list of books offered free on Instafreebie.

https://claims.instafreebie.com/gg/Rk...


message 9: by Clare (new)

Clare O'Beara | 5926 comments Mod
I'm currently reading KSR's Sixty Days and Counting
Sixty Days and Counting (Science in the Capital, #3) by Kim Stanley Robinson
Having some strange dreams.


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