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Animals > Elephants

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message 1: by Clare (last edited Oct 18, 2017 02:06AM) (new)

Clare O'Beara | 6197 comments Mod
Sadly, elephants are more under threat now than ever, due to highly organised gangs killing them with high powered weapons for ivory. The poachers make tiny amounts of money but the tusks are smuggled and sold mainly to Asia.
Clearing elephants off land also opens up the land for development.

Now, DNA analysis coupled with carbon-14 dating is able to prove the date and location of a smuggled tusk's origin. This can prove it has not come from antique or legal sales.

In Fighting Illegal Ivory, EU Lags Behind (National Geographic)
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/20...

Elephants on the path to extinction - the facts (The Guardian)
https://www.theguardian.com/environme...

Elephant poachers are hard at work in Africa, and carbon dating proves it (LA Times)
http://www.latimes.com/science/scienc...

100,000 Elephants Killed by Poachers in Just Three Years, Landmark Analysis Finds (National Geographic)
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/ne...


message 2: by Jimmy (new)

Jimmy | 1582 comments Mod
I don't think any large animals are going to be able to survive in the wild along with humans. The time is fast approaching when we will only have elephants in captivity. What a tragedy.


message 3: by Clare (new)

Clare O'Beara | 6197 comments Mod
Agreed.


message 4: by James (new)

James Kraus | 161 comments Sad. JK


message 5: by Jimmy (new)

Jimmy | 1582 comments Mod
Saving a baby elephant:

https://video.nationalgeographic.com/...


message 6: by Clare (new)

Clare O'Beara | 6197 comments Mod
According to a lawsuit, Facebook has been profiting - by selling ads - from the illegal wildlife parts trade.
The article claims that closed groups on the site regularly sell elephant parts and other illegal items. Investigators went to the Asian countries to check out the sellers.
https://www.care2.com/causes/facebook...


message 7: by Clare (new)

Clare O'Beara | 6197 comments Mod
Jimmy wrote: "Saving a baby elephant:

https://video.nationalgeographic.com/......"


Ahhhhh Jimmy! made my day!


message 8: by Clare (new)

Clare O'Beara | 6197 comments Mod
We know this already but this article has a nice short film about how elephants that survived a civil war - killing for ivory went to pay for guns - tended to be the genetically tuskless females, and now they are producing tuskless daughters.
https://www.care2.com/causes/these-el...

The tuskless gene is how Ceylon still has elephants.


message 9: by Robert (new)

Robert Zwilling | 2034 comments You can not depend on facebook to police itself. They would have to hire a lot more employees which would impact their bottom line. These new employees would be clerks which are the kind of jobs highly computerized operations pride themselves on eliminating from the payrolls.

When you marvel at all the things Mother Nature is doing to restore balance there is absolutely no reason why it couldn't continue to tip the scales and slide us back into the dark ages. Ironic if massive polar ice caps affected the gravity field such that the big near misses we have start coming in a whole lot closer.


message 10: by Clare (new)

Clare O'Beara | 6197 comments Mod
Well, the weight is still on the planet Robert, as the water is still there, just redistributed. I don't see how that could affect the gravity field.
And your idea sounds a whole lot too depressing for me. Let's contend with the floods first.


message 11: by Clare (new)

Clare O'Beara | 6197 comments Mod
What to do with the last remaining elephant? Poor creature.

https://www.ecowatch.com/drax-carbon-...


message 12: by Susan (new)

Susan Budd (susanbudd) I don’t understand how anyone can want ivory when it comes at the expense of these beautiful intelligent creatures. I read something about dying their tusks pink so poachers will not want their ivory. I don’t know if it’s true, but I hope it is (assuming the dye is harmless to the animals).


message 13: by Clare (new)

Clare O'Beara | 6197 comments Mod
I'm not sure if it can be done with elephants, but I've seen this idea trialled with rhinos. The horn is injected with a cattle wormer which would make anyone eating it sick. The pink colour shows through and warns of the dose. Rhino horn is used either as so-called medicine or for carving so the pink devalues it. The structure of ivory is different and harder, so it might not go pink through the tusk. Got to try something.


message 14: by Jimmy (new)

Jimmy | 1582 comments Mod
Evolution is also involved:

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/an...


message 15: by Robert (new)

Robert Zwilling | 2034 comments Meet Mosha, the elephant with a prosthetic leg

https://www.aol.com/article/news/2019...


message 16: by Clare (new)


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