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Archives 2017 > w/o October 13 to 19, 2017

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message 1: by ❀ Susan (new)

❀ Susan G (susanayearofbooksblogcom) | 3531 comments Mod
Good morning everyone! For those of us living in Canada it has been a short work week after celebrating Thanksgiving. Are you joining our group read this month, finishing up BINGO 2017 or reading books from the multiple award lists that we have been following - it certainly is an exciting time of year for book lovers!!

What are you reading? What is up next?


message 2: by Diane (last edited Oct 13, 2017 04:28AM) (new)

Diane (Tvor) | 357 comments Started to get overwhelmed by how many books I had on the go (it does happen!) so I really made a concerted effort and finishedMansfield Park by Jane Austen, The Watch that Ends the Night by Hugh MacLennan (finished my 2017 Bingo!) and I started and finished The Rules of Magic by Alice Hoffman because it was a Netgalley file and I realized it was going to expire soon. Really loved that book!

I think I may drop The Manticore by Robertson Davies down the priority list because while I don't want to give up, I'm just not that into it and since I'm about 60% done, I can't see the point in abandoning it now. But I think it will linger awhile. Am now turning the pages on The Girl Who Takes an Eye for an Eye by David Lagercrantz and Bellevue Square by Michael Redhill.


message 3: by Louise (new)

Louise | 1171 comments This week I finished reading Conversations with Friends which I loved. This is written by a young Irish writer and it's her first novel. I look forward to her future books as I really like her writing style.

Then, in audio, I slogged through Son of a Trickster which I really disliked. I know I'm in the minority here but I found it really unpleasant to read. There were some funny and quirky parts and I liked some of the repartee between the characters, but overall it was a vulgar book. I loved Monkey Beach and Traplines but Blood Sports and Son of a Trickster have turned me off this author now.

I'm almost done reading All That Man Is, which started off more interesting than it's finishing. I'm beginning to tire of the unlikeable characters. But it's a well written book with an interesting concept. 9 chapters or short stories, of different men, at different points in their lives. As soon as I'm done with this one (by tomorrow I'm sure) I will be starting Transit.

In audio, I just started Exit West.


message 4: by Shannon (new)

Shannon White | 198 comments @Louise - keep us posted on Exit West. I'm interested to know about that one.

This week I finished The Secret Wife...got a little better at the end but in general, not a great piece of work. Too superficial.

I also whipped through The Prisoner in His Palace: Saddam Hussein, His American Guards, and What History Leaves Unsaid. I enjoyed it alot....it wasn't a detailed account of the Gulf War. It was more of a look at the leadership qualities of a monster and how he affected those around him.

Now I am about 1/3 through The History of Bees... I like the structure as it flips between 2098, present-day ish...let's call it 2012 and 1852 or so. The gist of it is, what would happen to the world if there were no bees. Enjoying the 3 stories and interested to see how they ultimately tie together.


message 5: by Emmkay (new)

Emmkay | 251 comments This short week has felt very loooong here! Cannot wait for the weekend.

I had a funny week of reading, toggling between more challenging and easier reads, the latter reflecting my need for some comfort reading.

I had a rotten day on Saturday and picked up Esther the Wonder Pig out of my free library. Not all that well-written, but just the breezy quick read I needed that evening.

I also read Nutshell. I often enjoy McEwan. This one wasn't my favourite, but I did find it amusing. However, it felt a bit more like an interesting exercise than a fully involving novel.

I'm currently fighting a nasty cold, so it's back to the comfort reading - Joanna Trollope's City of Friends, which is what my kiddo calls a 'mom book.'

@Louise, I didn't much like Son of a Trickster either, though I gave it 3 stars because (a) I love Eden Robinson and (b) some of it was funny. But I had that samefeeling you seem to have had, and I was surprised since I loved Monkey Beach. Am curious to see what you think of Exit West: I enjoyed it.


message 6: by Susan (new)

Susan | 723 comments This week I finished The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl on audio - it was just okay. I also finished I Am a Truck, which I liked very much. It gave me a lot to think about, and I also really loved the way the author used "le rock and roll" in the novel. I probably never would have found this novel if it hadn't been for the Giller, and for me, this is the best thing about award reading.

I'm still making my way through We Are Never Meeting In Real Life. It may be a bit too long - the essays are starting to seem a little same-y.

In award reading, I've focused on the National Book Award this week. I have Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI on the go (very interesting), as well as Sing, Unburied, Sing. I am LOVING Jesmyn Ward's book.

I'm jealous of those who have finished bingo. I've stalled again with three squares to complete. I think I finished in October last year but I have a feeling I'll still be working on bingo in December. It's not a coincidence that two of squares I have left involve rereads - I'm not a big rereader. I tried to pick up one of those books the other day but then I thought, IT'S AWARD SEASON! And that was the end of that.


Allison ༻hikes the bookwoods༺ (allisonhikesthebookwoods) | 1633 comments @Louise @Shannon, I did not enjoy listening to Exit West at all. The narrator was terrible. If I recall correctly, I think it was the author. I'm also not a fan of magical realism, so this book just didn't turn my crank.


Allison ༻hikes the bookwoods༺ (allisonhikesthebookwoods) | 1633 comments All in all, I've had a pretty terrible week. I felt a little under the weather on Monday, but it was nothing like the maelstrom that was to come. Feeling somewhat decent on Tuesday, I plowed through the day - work then book club - only to wake up Wednesday EXTREMELY ill. It wasn't until last night that I was well enough to pick up a book again. Stupid stomach bug!

Over the weekend, I read my second Giller nominee, I Am a Truck. At less than 200 pages, it's arguably a novella. I quite liked it, but I'm generally a fan of short fiction. There's something to be said for brevity! Somewhat improved last night, I managed to finish Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them. Being a screenplay instead of a novel, it's a very quick read.

In audio, I finished Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body and now I'm listening to the latest from Mary Kubica, Every Last Lie.


message 9: by Shannon (new)

Shannon White | 198 comments Allison ༻hikes the bookwoods༺ wrote: "@Louise @Shannon, I did not enjoy listening to Exit West at all. The narrator was terrible. If I recall correctly, I think it was the author. I'm also not a fan of magical realism, so this book jus..."

I didn't realize that there was magical realism involved. Thanks for the heads up as I am really not a fan of that!!!! #dodgedabullet :)


message 10: by Heather(Gibby) (new)

Heather(Gibby) (heather-gibby) | 406 comments Wow this week flew by quickly, a lot of unexpected thing came up, which cut into my reading time, so the only book I got finished up was The Bingo Palace . I did not realize it was book three of a series until after I was finished reading it and was reading other reviews. It is fine as a stand alone book, but usually like to read series in sequence.

I have started listening to Lincoln in the Bardo, I heard from others that this was much better in audio than reading it, but the first hour was kind of annoying as there are a lot of referencing to other sources, so it is like having footnotes read to you. I am settling into it now.

@ Allison feel better!


Allison ༻hikes the bookwoods༺ (allisonhikesthebookwoods) | 1633 comments @Heather(Gibby), I very rarely give up on a book, but the audio version of Lincoln in the Bardo was impossible for me to follow.


Allison ༻hikes the bookwoods༺ (allisonhikesthebookwoods) | 1633 comments And thanks for the well wishes. I'm feeling much better today.


message 13: by Megan (new)

Megan | 461 comments Happy Friday everyone!

I am slowly emerging from my cold. This was a rough one!

I finished reading The Republic of Love for Bingo. I have 1 bingo square left, audio....I've been avoiding it all year. I better find a audio book soon.....

I'm currently reading Brother. I won it as a giveaway on Goodreads. I'm really enjoying it so far.


message 14: by Allison (new)

Allison | 1906 comments It was a weird week here too! Something in the air...?! I decided on Wed to chop all my hair off -- big decision! -- only to pay top dollar for a TERRIBLE cut, which had me in tears for the afternoon, and obviously useless at work! Later the same day I then paid for a second haircut at another salon and now I love it! But I'm getting used to short after 20+ years long.

Not the stomach flu, but mentally time consuming in a self-absorbed way!

Onto books, the real reason we're here... :)

Still continuing on Alison Pick's newest. Learning lots, but as I am not Jewish, some of the old history or language is forcing me to Google a lot to get the full experience. Good read though.

In audio, gave up on Little Fires Everywhere only because I knew I wouldn't finish it before Overdrive took it back. Moved onto the heavy We Were Eight Years in Power: An American Tragedy, which is as high quality as you'd expect from Ta-Nehisi Coates, but I have been a little dismayed at the long time spent on the black-rights theories of Bill Cosby with little to no mention of the fact that the man is a serial rapist. Call me closed-minded, but I believe that that should set his opinions waaaaaay back from the front of the stage -- I'm certain there are other influential African-Americans with views just as vibrant. Anyway, I admire Coates and will keep going on his newest book. It really is a fascinating view that I obviously can't gain just with my own experience.


message 15: by Louise (new)

Louise | 1171 comments Emmkay wrote: "I also read Nutshell. I often enjoy McEwan. This one wasn't my favourite, but I did find it amusing. However, it felt a bit more like an interesting exercise than a fully involving novel. ."

I think it would have fit nicely in the Hogarth Shakespeare series.

I have heard Exit West being compared to The Underground Railroad which I did not like so I'm not too hopeful but it's a short book and for a book club so I shall soldier on.


message 16: by Louise (new)

Louise | 1171 comments Allison ༻hikes the bookwoods༺ wrote: "@Louise @Shannon, I did not enjoy listening to Exit West at all. The narrator was terrible. If I recall correctly, I think it was the author. I'm also not a fan of magical realism, so this book jus..."

I suspect I shall feel the same way.


message 17: by Megan (new)

Megan | 461 comments Allison wrote: "It was a weird week here too! Something in the air...?! I decided on Wed to chop all my hair off -- big decision! -- only to pay top dollar for a TERRIBLE cut, which had me in tears for the afterno..."

Allison, there is not much worse than a terrible short hair cut, I feel your pain!! I'm glad you got it fixed and and adjusting. I cut all of mine off a month ago, I think I might be finally getting the hang of it. :)


message 18: by Allison (new)

Allison | 1906 comments @Megan -- so true! It's like a chipped front tooth, which I went through years and years ago. You just want to hide and have no one see you!!

Getting the hang of it -- 48 hours in and no regrets, thanks to the second stylist! :)


Allison ༻hikes the bookwoods༺ (allisonhikesthebookwoods) | 1633 comments @Allison @Megan, I did the exact same thing about a year ago. I have always had long hair and decided to go for a pixie cut last September. It was kind of nice in retrospect, but I still regretted it. In the meantime, I think it took three cuts to get what I wanted initially. It's grown out to a bob length now, so I can live with that. Enjoy your new styles ladies!!


message 20: by ✿✿✿May (new)

✿✿✿May  | 671 comments Both Allison's, I hope you feel better soon!!

I read Into the Darkest Corner for my travel last week. It was pretty suspenseful. This week I read My Life in France in audio. What a treat! It was honest and funny. Now I am reading Fall Down 7 Times Get Up 8: A Young Man's Voice from the Silence of Autism in paper and listening to Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI.
Have a great weekend everyone!


message 22: by Susan (new)

Susan | 723 comments May, I am sort of fascinated by Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI. The case itself is shocking and so shameful (not sure how it will turn out yet, but it certainly seems shameful), but there's also a lot of interesting information about how the Osage were treated and "managed" by the government and how law enforcement functioned then.


message 23: by Louise (new)

Louise | 1171 comments Susan wrote: "May, I am sort of fascinated by Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI. The case itself is shocking and so shameful (not sure how it will turn out ye..."

I enjoyed that book. Eye opening for sure and ridiculous that this, like many other things, even happened.


message 24: by ❀ Susan (new)

❀ Susan G (susanayearofbooksblogcom) | 3531 comments Mod
Hi all - I am glad that @Allison ༻hikes the bookwoods༺ and @Megan are feeling better. Tis' the season for bugs now that the kids are back in school!!

I have had a quiet reading week again... short weeks are so busy!!

On the weekend I finished 3 books and then have not read much! These were:
I Am a Truck which i really enjoyed... still pondering about it and feel like it might deserve a reread before I blog about it. The writing just pulls you into the story.
Calm: Calm the Mind. Change the World - I am doing a bit of research into self care for a Lean In group that I belong too and this book was easy tips to being more calm.
Smile - this was a giveaway that I won. I was thrown off by the sprinkling of the "c"word which always makes me cringe. I am not sure why it was added as it certainly did not enhance the story which was also a puzzler.

I am in the midst of Outline which I am enjoying so far and listening to The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane (a lot late to the buddy read party). I am enjoying the story but struggling with the treatment of the women in the story.

This is a swim meet weekend so i am not sure how much reading will be done but i am hoping to sneak in some pages!! Enjoy the weekend!!


message 25: by ✿✿✿May (new)

✿✿✿May  | 671 comments @Susan, & Louise, I'm about 3/4 done listening to the book and I"m awestruck yet not surprised the extent of the conspiracy, but also fascinated with the evolution of forensics over the year :)


message 26: by Petra (last edited Oct 14, 2017 03:11PM) (new)

Petra | 652 comments Happy weekend everyone!
Like Susan, I've had a busy week. Short weeks somehow always feel busier at work. Our hospital is moving into a new building in 2 weeks and things are ramping up big time now.

I finished two books this week:
Proust's The Fugitive, which I rather enjoyed but felt this volume dragged a bit. For the shortest volume in this work, it felt much longer. I couldn't say that about any of the other volumes.
One more volume to go!

For Dystopian lovers, I highly recommend Wool Omnibus. Fantastic! I enjoyed every page.

I dropped my ereader the other day.
The book I was reading at the time?? = All the Broken Things !!!!!
I now have a new ereader. I'm almost afraid to go back to that book. LOL!

After breaking the ereader, I had to start another book and chose Prayers for the Stolen from my rickety pile. It's so good. I don't want to put it down.


message 27: by Mj (last edited Oct 14, 2017 05:27PM) (new)

Mj Happy to hear that those who had bugs are now on the mend. Hopefully next week will be healthy for everyone. Flu shots will be available soon if you’re in the camp that think they make a difference.

@ Petra - Sorry to hear about your Ereader.

@ Dianne - Congrats again on your 2017 Bingo completion. (mentioned in the Bingo thread as well.) Was impressed by your eclectic selection of books. The Rules of Magic sounds like an interesting book. As fantasy, it's out of my usual genre so will wait and see.

@ Emmkay - enjoy McEwan as well. Need to read more. My sister and hubby just read Nutshell and discussed it in a couples’ book club with friends. She liked it much more than him but it apparently made for good discussion in the group.

@ Louise - Good for you - getting an interest in a repeat prison visit from Lawrence Hill.

Also @ Louise Beartown was my first read by Fredrik Backman. I understand why expectations based on previous books left you disappointed. I was expecting a feel good book myself and didn't get one. Still ended up enjoying the book. Based on Beartown, I think Backman is an excellent story teller. He kept my interest throughout and I liked the messages and themes in this book. I suspect based on your response that this book was a lot different from his others.

@ Magdelanye - love bargains! love hot pink! and love lounging around all weekend reading in bathrobes - especially those that go all the way to the floor. So great for curling up. Enjoy! And love all the books you're reading.

@ Susan - Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI sounds like something I should read.

@ Barbara - Saw your post regarding a Book Club Choice in General discussion. Had it out, my partner read it. Will send a pm about my thoughts.

Will post my own reading in a separate post.

Everyone stay healthy and read lots and/or relax lots or at least as much as possible and as much as you deserve which is plenty!!


message 28: by Mj (last edited Oct 14, 2017 07:37PM) (new)

Mj My Reading - this week and upcoming

Like many others, I’ve had a lot on my plate recently and haven’t read as much as usual.

I did finish Transit by Rachel Cusk. It was quite similar to Outline - same main character - a female who mentors or teaches adults about writing. I enjoyed it but didn’t love it. Like Outline it is observational but more substantive because it had more characters and a bit more activity than the previous novel. Cusk’s writing is good. Her intelligence and knowledge about human relations are excellent and it engaged me a bit more than the previous book - more happening and more interactions.

Transit is the 2nd short listed Scotiabank Giller that I’ve read. Read Son of a Trickster in March 2017. Can’t say that I am routing for either to win. Unfortunately right now, I don’t see that I will be reading any of the other contenders before the winner announcement unless I get lucky or buy some books. I’m the first or very early in all the other waiting lsits but most are still on order.

This circumstance is the one that really makes me want to buy books (even though I don't have any more space.) Right now, I've resigned myself to reading "after" the announcement. It shouldn't make any difference in how much I enjoy the book.

Am currently reading We'll All Be Burnt in Our Beds Some Night. It was on the 2017 Scotiabank Giller long list but didn’t make the short list. Howver it did make the 2017 Governor General’s fiction short list. I had it out for Scotiabank Giller so I thought I’d give it a go. So far - lots of swearing. The humour and redemptive value hasn’t kicked in yet. I’ve heard it improves but I guess we'll see.

Just received A Two-Spirit Journey: The Autobiography of a Lesbian Ojibwa-Cree Elder - our current monthly read. Yay!!! So far (not much into it) am enjoying it. My only complaint is the very small font. I’m ok with stretching my brain but not so much for straining my eyes. It makes bedtime reading (something I do a lot) very difficult.

Just received an audio of Option B: Facing Adversity, Building Resilience, and Finding Joy. Audio is really hard for me to process but it was the only waiting list that was short. A buddy in an in-person book club recommended it and mentioned she wished it was around years ago when her hubby suddenly died. Rainey recommended it as well. Have been lucky not to have a partner die….but like many have had some traumatic life setbacks and felt it was worth looking into based on recommendations from two people whose suggestions I respect.

Lincoln in the Bardo also arrived. Have read some other Man Booker contenders and hope to read it before the winner announcement.

I also really, really want to read something fun and uplifting. Might try a Dick Francis mystery or Saint Mazie which I've read good things about.

Happy Reading Everyone!!


Allison ༻hikes the bookwoods༺ (allisonhikesthebookwoods) | 1633 comments @Mj, after reading both, is it necessary to read Outline before attempting Transit?


message 30: by Mj (last edited Oct 14, 2017 07:38PM) (new)

Mj @ Allison ༻hikes the bookwoods༺

In short - it will likely make no difference.

In longer explanation - I am usually a staunch advocate of always reading a book series in order. I'm a bit anal retentive about this. Because I haven't read the 3rd book (not yet published,) it makes it more difficult to answer.

Based on Books 1 & 2 don't think it makes any difference whether you read book 1 before book 2 (the caveat being I didn't really connect with the first book.) I don't think the primary character or narrator displayed enough of her personality (except for being observational) to make much to carry-forward to a second book.

Others who loved the book may feel differently and want to wade in. Please feel free to disagree.


message 31: by ❀ Susan (new)

❀ Susan G (susanayearofbooksblogcom) | 3531 comments Mod
@MJ - I am in the midst of Outline and will move on to Transit next as I too like to read them in order. :)


message 32: by Louise (new)

Louise | 1171 comments Allison ༻hikes the bookwoods༺ wrote: "@Mj, after reading both, is it necessary to read Outline before attempting Transit?"

I haven't read Transit yet (about to start it) but I did read Outline, and even in Outline many of the chapters could stand alone, so I'm guessing you can read Transit without reading Outline. There is no real plot, just human observations.


message 33: by Alan (new)

Alan | 542 comments Finished an hour ago We'll All Be Burnt in Our Beds Some Night and it completely blew me away. Just stunning prose,best book I’ve read in months. Yes it is extremely rough and vulgar,there is one very funny scene which will freak some readers out, but I found the book to be so moving and funny and mind-boggling in the prose. Very sorry he didn’t make the Giller short list but good for him for making the gg list. Will definitely be one of my favourites of 2017. This was my second Giller read and I have a few more at home,but I’m going to take a bit of a break before I carry on.
Also spent the week reading a lot of children’s illustrated books including a few gorgeous nominees for the ggs. Really speaks to my inner child. My first Sesame Street book had me beaming on my bus ride. Such delightful characters drawn with so much humour and love.


message 34: by Louise (new)

Louise | 1171 comments Alan wrote: "Finished an hour ago We'll All Be Burnt in Our Beds Some Night and it completely blew me away. Just stunning prose,best book I’ve read in months. Yes it is extremely rough and vulga..."

Thanks for the endorsement. I just put it on hold at the library. I'm 3rd in line.


message 35: by Mj (last edited Oct 14, 2017 07:58PM) (new)

Mj @ Alan - thanks for your thoughts on We'll All Be Burnt in Our Beds Some Night. You've really encouraged me to keep going. Funny, I gave my partner the book to read first even though I'd put it on hold for me (just had too much on the go.) He kept commenting that is was dragging and I kept encouraging him to continue as I'd read so many good things about it. He ended up finishing it and liking it. It seems I too need a coach to "go for it". Thanks for your comments and for being the enthusiastic coach that I need right now!!!

Fyi, I too a big fan of Illustrated Children's Books and have 4 of the 5 nominated books waiting for me to pick up as I write. It was your post about picking up 2 books that reminded me to investigate nominated GG illustration books. When the Moon Comes is the only unavailable book because it's still on order by my library. I just love the on-point messages, the gorgeous art and everything else about picture books.

Am really looking forward to reading them!!


message 36: by Alan (last edited Oct 14, 2017 08:35PM) (new)

Alan | 542 comments When the Moon Comes wasn’t my favourite. It is very endearing in its sweetness and simplicity,sort of like a lovely short story,but the one about the boy who’s father is an undersea miner in cape Breton is a stunner. Very powerful.


message 37: by Mj (last edited Oct 14, 2017 08:58PM) (new)

Mj Looking forward to reading the 4 that are currently available to me. It's interesting that there are way more copies being ordered for When the Moon Comes than for any other book. Not sure of the rationale and having read none of them can't even hazard a guess unless he's the only established author.


message 38: by Alan (new)

Alan | 542 comments I think he is,he might be the one who has written a hundred(!) books and won the gg a few times already. The book opens with a wonderful quotation from Stephen Leacock.


message 39: by Alison (new)

Alison Thompson | 11 comments I've had a bit of a lull in my reading. I got sick the weekend before Thanksgiving and was "comfort reading" old favourites then took a break.

I finally got back to it this weekend by starting a collection of Alistair MacLeod short stories. After reading the first story, The Boat, I realized why he is such a highly regarded author. I tend to greedily inhale good books and stories but I really had to force myself to slow down and take the time to appreciate his craft. He is such an amazing, evocative writer.

I didn't finish the cross Canada reading challenge on time but am continuing anyway. This will count as Nova Scotia.

I am also struggling my way through 'The Four Agreements.' It was recommended by someone in the HR department at work. The book is maddening, and the writing style atrocious, but I refuse to be defeated by a 140 page book! As I can only handle two or three pages before I have the urge to throw it across the room I am making slow progress.

At Thanksgiving my sister and I exchanged books. She lives four hours away so we don't see each other too often. We do talk books a lot so I suggested we each bring some books we thought the other would like to my parents' at Thanksgiving. The result is I now have a pile to work through once I'm done with MacLeod.


message 40: by Louise (new)

Louise | 1171 comments Alison wrote: "I finally got back to it this weekend by starting a collection of Alistair MacLeod short stories. After reading the first story, The Boat, I realized why he is such a highly regarded author. I tend to greedily inhale good books and stories but I really had to force myself to slow down and take the time to appreciate his craft. He is such an amazing, evocative writer..."

You are in for an absolute treat. I think he is Canada`s best short story writer.


message 41: by ❀ Susan (new)

❀ Susan G (susanayearofbooksblogcom) | 3531 comments Mod
@Alison - sorry to hear that you have not been feeling well and glad to hear that you are enjoying the cross-Canada challenge.

What a great way to share books with your sister!!


message 42: by Alison (new)

Alison Thompson | 11 comments @Louise - I don't know how it took me this long to read his short stories!

@Susan - My sister is recovering from a serious injury and is off work. She's been reading quite a bit as she has lots of time - she's been finding interesting books I want to read and I've been trying to come up with recommendations. It seemed like a fun idea to swap books. I hope we keep it up.
I'm trying to get her to join this group as I think she'd really enjoy it. I'll keep working on her!


message 43: by Allison ༻hikes the bookwoods༺ (last edited Oct 16, 2017 10:40AM) (new)

Allison ༻hikes the bookwoods༺ (allisonhikesthebookwoods) | 1633 comments Are any of you planning some spooky reads for the latter part of the month? My library is promoting "Spooky Booktober" so I downloaded a couple of the recommended audiobooks to try: The Fate of Mercy Alban and Those Across the River. With all the recent hype about The Rules of Magic, I'm also going to read Practical Magic and then the new one.


message 44: by Shannon (new)

Shannon White | 198 comments Allison ༻hikes the bookwoods༺ wrote: "Are any of you planning some spooky reads for the latter part of the month? My library is promoting "Spooky Booktober" so I downloaded a couple of the recommended audiobooks to try: [book:The Fate ..."

I like that idea! Maybe we should come up with a Spooky Booktober Canadian list.... I'd read one in true Halloween spirit. :)


message 45: by Heather(Gibby) (new)

Heather(Gibby) (heather-gibby) | 406 comments I am about an hour into Wicked Weeds: A Zombie Novel Although this is a "zombie" book, it is very cleverly written with many layers. It offers two ways the reader can approach it, from cover to cover, or with a reading order suggested in the Table of contents. It is labelled as Horror: Science fiction


Allison ༻hikes the bookwoods༺ (allisonhikesthebookwoods) | 1633 comments Shannon wrote: "I like that idea! Maybe we should come up with a Spooky Booktober Canadian list.... I'd read one in true Halloween spirit. :)"


I can't think of much in this vein that's Canadian. Anyone?


message 47: by Louise (new)

Louise | 1171 comments Allison ༻hikes the bookwoods༺ wrote: "Shannon wrote: "I like that idea! Maybe we should come up with a Spooky Booktober Canadian list.... I'd read one in true Halloween spirit. :)"


I can't think of much in this vein that's Canadian. ..."


https://www.hingstonandolsen.com/stor...


message 48: by Mj (new)

Mj Thanks Louise. Saw the Hingston and Dolsen recommendation in the NYT. I thought 52 dollars (including shipping) was too steep, especially when it seems that most of the authors are not Canadian. It's the publisher that is.

Haven't had a chance to review the following link for Canadian authors but it popped up on Goodreads.

https://www.goodreads.com/blog/show/1...


message 49: by Shannon (new)

Shannon White | 198 comments This has some Cdn ones for our East Coast friends. (They seem to like their ghosts in Halifax. :) )

https://www.booknetcanada.ca/blog/201...


message 50: by Mj (new)

Mj from Quill and Quire - some Canadian horror titles.

Nick Cutter should be pretty accessible for people looking for a horror novel.

https://quillandquire.com/book-news/2...

from Booknet Canada

https://www.booknetcanada.ca/blog/201...


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