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Day Moon (Tomorrow's Edge #1)
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Author Q&A: Beau Armstrong - Day Moon

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B.W. Morris (sixpackwriter) | 27 comments This week's Clean Reads author Q&A is with Beau (Brett) Armstrong, the author of Day Moon. Here is the blurb about his novel.

A.D. 2039: A prodigious seventeen year old, Elliott, is assigned to work on a global software initiative his deceased grandfather helped found. Project Alexandria is intended to provide the entire world secure and equal access to all accumulated human knowledge. All forms of print are destroyed in good faith, to ensure everyone has equal footing, and Elliott knows he must soon part with his final treasure: a book of Shakespeare's complete works gifted him by his grandfather.

Before it is destroyed, Elliott notices something is amiss with the book, or rather Project Alexandria. The two do not match, including an extra sonnet titled "Day Moon". When Elliott investigates, he uncovers far more than he bargained for. There are sinister forces backing Project Alexandria who have no intention of using it for its public purpose. Elliott soon finds himself on the run from federal authorities and facing betrayals and deceit from those closest to him. Following clues left by his grandfather, with agents close at hand, Elliott desperately hopes to find a way to stop Project Alexandria. All of history past and yet to be depend on it.


I will now turn it over to Beau to share information and trivia about the book and for everyone to ask questions.


message 2: by Brett (new)

Brett Armstrong | 13 comments Thank you for the chance to talk about Day Moon. When I wrote the book I tried to include a lot of little clues and details about where the story was going. Authenticity in the futuristic technology and little details was really important to me too. So I have one fact for each endeavor.

Early on, Elliott recalls a conversation he had with his grandfather before the car accident that took Grandpa McIntyre. During the conversation, Grandpa McIntyre told Elliott that thanks to the automated driving systems in place the odds of a car accident were 1 in 570,080,025. I researched it and that is the approximate projected US population for the 2039, the year in which the novel is set. Grandpa McIntyre was hinting to Elliott, and the reader, there are no true accidents.

My attempt to keep close eye to details also includes the "Day Moon" sonnet itself. I researched the forms Shakespeare used for his real sonnets and since the overwhelming majority are in iambic pentameter with rhyme scheme abab cdcd efef gg, I wrote the "Day Moon" sonnet in that form. The whole thing gave me a whole new level of respect for Shakespeare's plays, which use iambic pentameter.


message 3: by Jennifer (new)

Jennifer (jenniferfroelich) | 25 comments I love details like that! How did you decide what your future would look like? As in, how much tech, how much decay, how social constructs or values change, what kind of slang is used, etc?


message 4: by Brett (new)

Brett Armstrong | 13 comments Jennifer wrote: "I love details like that! How did you decide what your future would look like? As in, how much tech, how much decay, how social constructs or values change, what kind of slang is used, etc?"

It was kind of a combination of my love for history and the vantage point my day job gives me. I knew the progression of technology for the past couple decades and the trends that had already played out and some of how people expected things to go in the past (as well as what did and didn't pan out). I tried to extrapolate that progression onto the trends I get exposed to working in computer science. So the technology ended out being an attempt to realistically guess what things would be like in twenty-five years (that was how far out it was when I started). Though I did take a bit of liberty with how automated cars are implemented to strengthen the theme of not being able to diverge from the path given you.

The social aspects of the story were born in a similar way. I looked at past and present cultural trends and imagined what things might look like if left unaltered. Though I didn't giver nearly as much attention to slang except the term "mobiles" over "cell" or "phone" and "shuttle" over "bus." That's something I'll have to pay more attention to in the sequel.

When I started Day Moon I wanted to write a dystopian novel I felt could really play out. I really enjoy The Hunger Games, but apart from some of its social commentary about our culture, its not a very viable future. I find 1984 and Brave New World far more terrifying, precisely because they each have, to varying degrees, become reality. I wanted Day Moon to go a step further and put readers in a world where there was no great social or military revolution. No natural disaster. Only the consequences of day-to-day choices made over the decades without taking stock of those consequences along the way.


message 5: by Eve (new)

Eve Culley | 14 comments I am utterly amazed by all the genres of authors Clean Reads includes. I get so wrapped up in other authors books and think WOW! what a cool book. I also like this concept here as it gives me opportunities to pick other author's brains and get the scoop on the hows and whys of their writing. Your book, Day Moon, is certainly on the opposite end of the spectrum from what I write but it is definitely going on my must-read list. Good job!


message 6: by Brett (new)

Brett Armstrong | 13 comments Eve wrote: "I am utterly amazed by all the genres of authors Clean Reads includes. I get so wrapped up in other authors books and think WOW! what a cool book. I also like this concept here as it gives me oppor..."

Thank you, Eve! I have to agree, it really is incredible to see the breadth of stories that can be told.


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