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Wealth & Economics > Bezos silent starters or do we think enough?

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message 1: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13537 comments I found this one kinda amusing: https://www.inc.com/justin-bariso/ama... that Bezos often starts meetings of his top executives from dudes reading and thinking over memos, before actually talking and discussing.
I know we have threads here about walking and other stuff. But what about thinking?
And I'm not talking of thinking what to wear tonight or why the bread is appreciating, but something more complex about goals, values, achievements, system, environment, etc?
Many act on autopilot in day-to-day life. Not saying anything's wrong with it, especially if a person is happy and content, but still.. Do we think enough?


message 2: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9543 comments I think it should be mandatory for Board members to understand what they are deciding. Asking people to think before deciding is a good step forward, in my opinion.


message 3: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5382 comments I'm assuming that cell phones were turned off during the meetings, which would be a big plus as far as executives being able to concentrate.

Use of cell phones distracts workers. According to this Forbes article, "There is actually a name for this cell phone addiction and it’s called nomophobia. If we are addicted to the alerts and messages our phone provide, it would make sense that it could be impacting our work.

According to Pew Research Center, cell owners between the ages of 18 and 24 exchange an average of 109.5 messages on a normal day—that works out to more than 3,200 texts per month.

If we assume a millennial spends one third of their day at work, they are receiving somewhere between 30-40 messages during a workday.

What is shocking about this number is that the Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance found that the rate of errors made after hearing or feeling an alert on one’s phone was about the same as if they had actually answered the call or message.

How bad are these errors? A 2013 study at FSU found that probability of making an error increased by 28% after getting a phone call and 23% after getting a text.

A recent CareerBuilder study confirmed the distraction generator that is our mobile device. When asked to name the biggest productivity killer at work, employees responded that their cell phone and texting topped the list."


message 4: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9543 comments For what it is worth, it has been estimated here that quite a large fraction of lour road toll is due to cell phones.


message 5: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13537 comments Should "thinking" be on a requirement list for any employee, or mostly - for philosophers ?


message 6: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9543 comments Thinking should be requirement for any employer, anyway :-)


message 7: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 13537 comments I guess, some think (?) exactly that - that thinking is employer's privilege :)


message 8: by G.R. (new)

G.R. Paskoff (grpaskoff) | 249 comments I have worked with many different types of employees. The ones that think critically about the tasks and projects they work on have been the best. Often, just like using beta readers on a novel, those that think critically will discover details and issues that I missed when planning out a project. With the ones that don't think critically, they just do exactly what they are told and many times, because no two projects are exactly alike, there are problems that require extra time, work and money. The only problem with those critically-thinking employees is that they are harder to retain as they often have more ambition and career goals than the non-thinking variety.

In my experience, I have found that more of the thinking is being done by fewer within the population, and technology and AI is making it even worse. We are quickly evolving toward machines doing all our thinking for us - just as depicted and predicted in many sci-fi movies. ;)


message 9: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 9543 comments Nik wrote: "I guess, some think (?) exactly that - that thinking is employer's privilege :)"

No! Obligation. Only too many fail. And I agree with G.R. There is no reason why employees shouldn't think, and I believe good employers should encourage that. Retaining the good thinking employee requires good rewards, though.


message 10: by Philip (new)

Philip (phenweb) Ian wrote: "Nik wrote: "I guess, some think (?) exactly that - that thinking is employer's privilege :)"

No! Obligation. Only too many fail. And I agree with G.R. There is no reason why employees shouldn't th..."


If only employers wanted thinking staff....


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