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Discussion > Non-English Literary Horror

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message 1: by Neutrino (new)

Neutrino Increasing | 62 comments What prompted me to open this thread is the recent discussion of Lovecraft's Supernatural Horror in Literature. That reminded me of one observation about it, ie little attention Lovecraft gave to tradition of supernatural horror in non-English corners of the world, outside of briefly covering some German and French Romantic authors.
So, what are some of your favorites that deserve more attention among English-speaking horror readers? Some names are generally familiar to genre enthusiasts, like Stefan Grabiński, Rampo Edogawa, Jean Ray, Villiers de L'Isle-Adam... And of course, we have well known detours into supernatural horror by authors like Guy de Maupassant and many others.
But, who are the lost gems ("lost" at least outside of their native countries), at least some of whose works are available in English?
I guess that anthologies like these might be of some use...
The Dedalus Book of French Horror: The 19th Century
The Dedalus Book of Polish Fantasy
Kaiki: Uncanny Tales From Japan, Vol. 1 Tales Of Old Edo
Country Delights - Kaiki: Uncanny Tales from Japan, Vol. 2


message 2: by Nancy (new)

Nancy Oakes (quinnsmom) | 124 comments The Dedalus collections are perfect for picking up new authors to read. I recently read The Dedalus Book of French Horror: The 19th Century -- it was great and I expanded my tbr pile.

Here are few more books/authors that I can think of off the top of my head (I'm too lazy to go upstairs and look at the moment):


Gustav Meyrink
Claude Seignolle
Hanns Heinz Ewers

The Devil In Love, by Jacques Cazotte
One Thousand and One Ghosts, by Alexandre Dumas
Tales of Moonlight and Rain, by Ueda Akinari
Kwaidan: Ghost Stories and Strange Tales of Old Japan, Lafcadio Hearn (ed.)


message 3: by Paul (new)

Paul | 75 comments Karl Hans Strobl is worth checking out, if you like Ewers at his more explicit.
Kyōka Izumi is one of a kind. You can read one of his best stories online http://www.intangible.org/Acrobat/Fea...
it displays his mastery at balancing the idyllic with nightmarish.
Realm Of The Dead by Hyakken Uchida is a striking collection of short prose nightmares, tho it won't be to everyone's taste.

I've been meaning to check out Paul Busson's novels as they have been highly praised by Karl Edward Wagner and E. F. Bleiler, and recently I've ordered a collection of Thomas Owen's short stories.


message 4: by Samuel (new)

Samuel Moss (perfidiousscript) | 70 comments This thread is great, I'm specifically interested in contemporary or traditional Russian/Soviet horror if anyone is familiar with it.


message 5: by Bill (new)

Bill Hsu (billhsu) | 1328 comments You guys probably know Roland Topor already, but just in case...


message 6: by Dan (new)

Dan | 346 comments Contemporary Russian horror writers are not being translated into Enlish yet, but here are the big three:

Alexei Sholokhov
Alexander Vargo
Tony Vilgotsky

Here is a book that might interest you too: Stories That Scared Even Stalin: The Great Russian Tales of Horror, Suspense and Fantasy


message 7: by Samuel (new)

Samuel Moss (perfidiousscript) | 70 comments Dan wrote: "Contemporary Russian horror writers are not being translated into Enlish yet, but here are the big three:

Alexei Sholokhov
Alexander Vargo
Tony Vilgotsky

Here i..."


Excellent Dan! Thanks you.


message 8: by Caleb.Lives (last edited Oct 11, 2017 01:59AM) (new)

Caleb.Lives | 45 comments "The Dedalus Book of Polish Fantasy"
Sweet, this actually contains two Grabinski stories from the currently criminally expensive In Sarah's House.
Anyhow, Black Coat Press & Brian Stableford are eminently relevant to this thread, as they have been diligently translating French horror fiction produced during the last two centuries:
https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_no...

I am surprised that there isn't more contemporary Japanese horror literature in translation, given the extreme popularity of their horror mangas and movies in the West.


message 9: by Paul (new)

Paul | 75 comments Speaking of Eastern European horror, it'd sure be nice to have Dejan Ognjanović's fiction translated to English, I'd think it at least somewhat more likely to happen given how he's been publishing critical articles for a number of English-language genre fiction publications. His novel Zavodnik sounds interesting, folk horror based on slavic folk beliefs.


message 10: by Randolph, Randy (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 161 comments What a great thread.


message 11: by Ronald (new)

Ronald (rpdwyer) | 557 comments Randolph wrote: "What a great thread."

Yes indeed. This is the sort of thing which makes this group my favorite internet group.

I've read:
stories by Grabinski
Topor's novel _The Tenant_.
two short stories by Jean Ray and his novel _Malpertius_
a couple of short stories and essays by Ewers, and his novel _Alraune_. Based on what I read, though, Ewers is much better at the novel form.
_The Other Side of the Mountain_ by Bernanos
_Weird Tales of a Bagalorean_ by Jayaprakash Satyamurthy
_The Twenty Days of Turn_ by Giorgio De Maria


message 12: by Randolph, Randy (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 161 comments I’m glad the members are owning the group. I’m only here to cut the grass.


message 13: by Caleb.Lives (new)

Caleb.Lives | 45 comments I should've mentioned Georg Heym's slim fictional output, which is quite uniquely disturbing.


message 14: by Paul (new)

Paul | 75 comments Ronald wrote: "Based on what I read, though, Ewers is much better at the novel form."
I do love some of his short stories (much like with Meyrink, only a portion of his short fiction would qualify as horror or dark fantasy) but yeah, "Alraune" and "The Sorcerer's Apprentice" are quite something. Remarkably different from one another, too, in spite of being written within a short span and belonging to this same loose "trilogy".

I've thought of a couple of contemporary authors.
Eddie M. Angerhuber and Eddy C. Bertin.
I've heard of both trough Mark Samuels' praise, tho I don't own translated collections by either. Angerhuber's story was also featured in that Ligotti tribute anthology from some years back, and a handful of her stories can be read online:
https://web.archive.org/web/200311110...
http://shadow-writer.co.uk/heart1.html
Accomplished Ligottian writer but, unfortunately, sole English collection of hers is all but completely unobtainable nowadays and she apparently fell off the the face of the earth in the meantime.
Bertin's collection is in print, I've read nothing of his tho. But again, Samuels likes him so that counts for something.


message 15: by Caleb.Lives (new)

Caleb.Lives | 45 comments ^I think that Joe R. Lansdale was looking into contacting Angerhuber about potential reprint of her collection, ages ago. Nothing ever came of it.

By the way, I see that some of this board's other regulars liked Anne-Sylvie Salzman's fiction.


message 16: by Marie-Therese (new)

Marie-Therese (mariethrse) | 550 comments What an excellent thread! I hope to be able to contribute more later when I am a little less pressed for time and am able to go back over my library in greater depth. I try to read lots of non-English fiction in every genre and form, so this question is of great interest to me.

Paul wrote: "Kyōka Izumi is one of a kind."

Kyōka Izumi is one of my desert island writers. Just truly remarkable and a writer everyone should read, in my opinion. I highly recommend Japanese Gothic Tales and In Light of Shadows: More Gothic Tales by Izumi Kyoka .

Caleb.Lives wrote: "By the way, I see that some of this board's other regulars liked Anne-Sylvie Salzman's fiction."

Yes! I know that both Bill and I like her work and think she's well worth checking out.

LitHub recently posted a very interesting article featuring contemporary feminist literary horror: The New Scream Queens While some of the writers mentioned work in English (although based in Canada and Nigeria, so not from the US), Mariana Enríquez is Argentinian and writes in Spanish. Her book Things We Lost in the Fire sounds fascinating and I hope to read it soon.


message 17: by Neutrino (new)

Neutrino Increasing | 62 comments There is one more Kyōka Izumi story in Kaiki Vol. 2, one of anthologies that I have posted in the OP. Story in question wasn't available in English before that.
BTW, Miyuki Miyabe's collection of ghost stories, one of which was featured in the same volume of Kaiki, was translated to English in the meantime: Apparitions: Ghosts of Old Edo.
I cannot vouch for the whole of that collection, but her story from Kaiki was pretty solid and it looks like the reviews on GR are relatively favorable.


message 18: by Dan (new)

Dan | 346 comments This interesting article on where to start with Japanese horror just popped up in my email box. I thought I would share the link: http://www.unboundworlds.com/2017/10/...


message 19: by Scott (new)

Scott No mention of Ring? Parasite Eve and The Crimson Labyrinth were pretty good. Still have to read Another but I liked the anime.


message 20: by Dan (new)

Dan | 346 comments This list is fun to look at for all, but of particular interest for those looking for modern, translated Russian horror might be #4: https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/th...


message 21: by Samuel (new)

Samuel Moss (perfidiousscript) | 70 comments Dan wrote: "This list is fun to look at for all, but of particular interest for those looking for modern, translated Russian horror might be #4: https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/th..."

Sweet!


message 22: by Bill (new)

Bill Hsu (billhsu) | 1328 comments Dan wrote: "This list is fun to look at for all, but of particular interest for those looking for modern, translated Russian horror might be #4: https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/th..."
I actually had significant reservations about the Petrushevskaya collection. But then I'm picky.


message 23: by Bill (new)

Bill Hsu (billhsu) | 1328 comments Marie-Therese wrote: " Mariana Enríquez is Argentinian and writes in Spanish. Her book Things We Lost in the Fire sounds fascinating and I hope to read it soon. ."

Update: We are both in the middle of Things We Lost in the Fire. I'm really enjoying it, and I believe Marie-Therese is as well.


message 24: by Marie-Therese (new)

Marie-Therese (mariethrse) | 550 comments Bill wrote: "Update: We are both in the middle of Things We Lost in the Fire. I'm really enjoying it, and I believe Marie-Therese is as well. "

Yes, I am! This is one of the best short story collections I've read this year. I can't recommend it highly enough.


message 25: by Bill (new)

Bill Hsu (billhsu) | 1328 comments Marie-Therese wrote: "This is one of the best short story collections I've read this year. "
Hopefully it will get on the Shirley Jackson shortlist. They need to atone for Jeffrey Ford winning last year for single-author collection.


message 26: by Paul (new)

Paul | 75 comments I've been going thru short stories of Erckmann-Chatrian. So far so good, I'd describe them as popcorn romanticism.


message 27: by Bill (last edited Nov 20, 2017 09:47AM) (new)

Bill Hsu (billhsu) | 1328 comments Marie-Therese wrote: "This is one of the best short story collections I've read this year. "
Have you finished "The Neighbor's Courtyard"? What a way to start the morning.

Like Del Toro's best films, in Enriquez's stories, there are powerful resonances between the horror of real background historical events, and the specifics of the narratives.


message 28: by Neutrino (new)

Neutrino Increasing | 62 comments Horthólary: Tales from Montagascony by Michael Reynier recently received glowing review in Black Static (https://www.facebook.com/tartarus.pre...). Stories were originally written in English, but the author is French and all of them share historic French setting. Sounds interesting enough.


message 29: by Marie-Therese (new)

Marie-Therese (mariethrse) | 550 comments Bill wrote: "Marie-Therese wrote: "This is one of the best short story collections I've read this year. "
Have you finished "The Neighbor's Courtyard"? What a way to start the morning."


Not there yet (about two stories ahead of it, starting "End of Term"). I've been reading this collection little by little because it is just so good that I hate the thought of it ending.


message 30: by Paul (new)

Paul | 75 comments Neutrino wrote: "Horthólary: Tales from Montagascony by Michael Reynier recently received glowing review in Black Static (https://www.facebook.com/tartarus.pre......"

I've posted a review of Horthólary some time ago. I thought it pretty great, really classy and erudite, but I suspect that those stories will be all too old fashioned and slow-paced for most folks.


message 31: by Ronald (new)

Ronald (rpdwyer) | 557 comments _Let the Right One In_ is a 2004 vampire fiction novel by Swedish writer John Ajvide Lindqvist.

I haven't read the novel, but I saw the movie adaptation, which I rate a solid 3 out of 4 stars.


message 32: by Marie-Therese (last edited Dec 03, 2017 11:58PM) (new)

Marie-Therese (mariethrse) | 550 comments Ronald wrote: "_Let the Right One In_ is a 2004 vampire fiction novel by Swedish writer John Ajvide Lindqvist.

I haven't read the novel, but I saw the movie adaptation, which I rate a solid 3 out of 4 stars."


The Swedish film is very good (the child actors are amazing) but the book is even better (deeper, more detailed). I highly recommend it to anyone who liked the film.


message 33: by Paul (new)

Paul | 75 comments This might be of some interest:
http://www.diseasedgardens.com/MyNewB...
Professional English translations of hitherto untranslated short stories (some of them meaty novellas) from a number of francophone horror writers. Ray, Seignolle, Owen... Latest update was a lengthy novella of Ray's whose availability was extremely limited even in its original French.
Oh, and there is a couple of authors in there who never had any prior appearances in English.


message 34: by Randolph, Randy (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 161 comments Paul wrote: "This might be of some interest:
http://www.diseasedgardens.com/MyNewB...
Professional English translations of hitherto untranslated short stories (some of them meaty novellas) from a nu..."


This is highly recommended.


message 35: by Randolph, Randy (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 161 comments If you stroll through the New York Review of Books catalog there are a fair number of non-English horror, decadent, and weird fiction offerings.


message 36: by Neutrino (new)

Neutrino Increasing | 62 comments Paul wrote: "This might be of some interest:
http://www.diseasedgardens.com/MyNewB...
Professional English translations of hitherto untranslated short stories (some of them meaty novellas) from a nu..."

Sweet, I had no idea about this! I'll put it to good use.


message 37: by Ronald (new)

Ronald (rpdwyer) | 557 comments Horacio Quiroga, Latin American writer of short stories. The only story I've read by him so far is "The Feathered Pillow" which appears in this book:

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1...


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