OWP's Wild Things Discussion discussion

6 views
Best illustrations

Comments Showing 1-11 of 11 (11 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Betsy (new)

Betsy | 13 comments Let's use this space to list some titles that we recommend based on the illustrations.


message 2: by Christene (new)

Christene Alfonsi | 9 comments "Billy Twitters and His Blue Whale Problem" is a delightful story with AMAZING illustrations (Story by Mac Barnett, illustrations by Adam Rex).

Will Hillenbrand's illustrations are beautiful--any book he's done is worth checking out.


message 3: by Amanda (new)

Amanda Lawson (amandalawson) | 9 comments Brian Selznick- The Invention of Hugo Cabret. I love how it reads like a movie. Selznick slowly (over the course of pages) zooms in on specific details through pure illustration. Following pages of illustration, he will continue the storyline. I love how he flips between illustrations and words, each adding to the plot. I have not read his other books, but from what I have seen, they are composed in a similar fashion.


message 4: by Christene (new)

Christene Alfonsi | 9 comments Amanda wrote: "Brian Selznick- The Invention of Hugo Cabret. I love how it reads like a movie. Selznick slowly (over the course of pages) zooms in on specific details through pure illustration. Following pages of..."

Ooooooh, yes! Selznick's illustrations are fantastic. Have you read "Wonderstruck?"


message 5: by Amanda (new)

Amanda Lawson (amandalawson) | 9 comments Christene wrote: "Amanda wrote: "Brian Selznick- The Invention of Hugo Cabret. I love how it reads like a movie. Selznick slowly (over the course of pages) zooms in on specific details through pure illustration. Fol..."
It is on my never ending list of books to read. I haven't heard much about it, but the layout looks similar. Have you read it? How does it compare to The Invention of Hugo Cabret?


message 6: by Catherine (new)

Catherine | 12 comments Christene wrote: ""Billy Twitters and His Blue Whale Problem" is a delightful story with AMAZING illustrations (Story by Mac Barnett, illustrations by Adam Rex).

Will Hillenbrand's illustrations are beautiful--any ..."

I love all books by Will Hillenbrand. My daughter especially loves his "Bear and Bunny" series. The pictures are just beautiful. Also, my dad taught Will history in high school! We love talking to him at "Books by the Banks" each year, too.


message 7: by Catherine (new)

Catherine | 12 comments Amanda wrote: "Christene wrote: "Amanda wrote: "Brian Selznick- The Invention of Hugo Cabret. I love how it reads like a movie. Selznick slowly (over the course of pages) zooms in on specific details through pure..."

"Wonderstruck" is fantastic! There are two storylines- a female and a male character. The female's story is wordless, and the male's has words. They are from different time periods, but eventually they overlap. It is really amazing what he can do using pictures to tell the story. I think there is a movie coming out at some point, too.


message 8: by Catherine (new)

Catherine | 12 comments There are so many great books out there with fantastic illustrations!

I love the illustrations in Chris Van Allsburg's books. They are fantastic for making inferences and for teaching point of view. My students always get a kick out of reading "Two Bad Ants." I usually use it to teach point of view since the illustrations really emphasize what the world looks like through the ant's point of view. Then, we switch the point of view and write from the human's pov. The pictures create a lot of really great discussion on this! I love all of his books, but "The Stranger" is another favorite of mine, and it is great for making predictions. Of course, I could never forget "The Polar Express," either! It is amazing how realistic his images are.

Another book I like is "The Invisible Boy" by Trudy Ludwig. It has very simple illustrations, but the pictures are helpful to understanding the story. It is about a boy who is not treated well and feels invisible, but what is neat with the illustrations is that as he is noticed, the pictures of him become more noticeable as he turns from black and white to color. It is fun when the students notice this as we read.

"A Bad Case of Stripes" by David Shanon is another fun one that the kids love to read when we are studying the fantasy genre. They get a kick out of the illustrations as the girl's body in the story changes in different ways- red white and blue, fungus, polka dots, etc.

"Owl Moon" by Jane Yolen has really beautiful, realistic illustrations, too. This one is great to teach with setting. Also, "Come on Rain" by Karen Hesse fits well when discussing sensory details and mood.

I could go on and on! I am looking forward to reading other ideas and adding to my collection!


message 9: by Catherine (new)

Catherine | 12 comments On the topic of books with illustrations, many of my students are really into the graphic novel genre this year. They just fly off the shelves! What are your thoughts on graphic novels in the classroom? What are your favorite graphic novels, or what are ones that your students have enjoyed? I know my students have devoured "Sisters," "Drama," "Rollergirl," and "El Deafo."


message 10: by Christene (new)

Christene Alfonsi | 9 comments Christene wrote: "Amanda wrote: "Brian Selznick- The Invention of Hugo Cabret. I love how it reads like a movie. Selznick slowly (over the course of pages) zooms in on specific details through pure illustration. Fol..."
It's similar to Hugo in that the story is told through both words and illustrations. Other than that, it's completely unique. It tells two stories from two different time periods that are connected. I really love it. Totally worth checking out.


message 11: by Lindsay (new)

Lindsay (lorelai1945) | 6 comments This is a really hard question for me to answer since there are so many amazing picture books, new and old, that have gorgeous illustrations. I personally think that picture books and children's literature in general is just so high-quality and well done right now! Growing up in the 80's, I don't remember as many books with art-level quality illustrations as I see every time I walk into a bookstore these days.
One illustrator in particular, Christian Robinson, always catches my eye. Some of the recent books he's illustrated are Gaston, Antoinette, and The Last Stop on Market Street. He also did a book about Josephine Baker that is striking.
Another book that I love is What Do You Do With an Idea? illustrated by Mae Besom. I love the premise of the book and its dreamy, Japanese-style illustrations equally.
Books from my childhood that came to mind are Miss Rumphius by Barbara Cooney, with its beautiful seascapes and lavender color scheme, and all of the Brambly Hedge books by Jill Barklem, which I used to spend hours pouring over, looking at all of the tiny details on every single page. As an adult, I purchased a box set of these both for nostalgic reasons and also because I still find them fascinating.


back to top