OWP's Wild Things Discussion discussion

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Possible Twitter Chat questions

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message 1: by Betsy (new)

Betsy | 13 comments Please add your thoughts for our Twitter chat on October 26. If you can, limit your question to about 130 characters. I will then use some of these questions to propel our online chat.


message 2: by Christene (new)

Christene Alfonsi | 9 comments Question for Handy: How did you choose the books/authors you focused on in the book?


message 3: by Lindsay (new)

Lindsay (lorelai1945) | 6 comments Also for Bruce Handy: What current/recent picture book titles do you think will stand the test of time and be considered future classics?


message 4: by Krista (new)

Krista Hill | 6 comments Can we ask Mr. Handy the point of view question? What was he thinking in terms of this while writing this book? Who was the audience he had in mind?


message 5: by Amanda (new)

Amanda Lawson (amandalawson) | 9 comments What sparked his admiration and love for Sendak?


message 6: by Catherine (new)

Catherine | 12 comments Graphic novels are very popular in my fifth grade classes. Handy mentions Cleary's characters leading the way for more recent characters such as Junie B. Jones, Judy Moody, and Greg Heffley. "Diary of a Wimpy Kid" has been one of these types of novels that my students enjoy. I believe any time I can get a student to read is a sign of success, even if it is a graphic novel, but I know some disagree. So, I would like to ask Handy what he thinks about the graphic novel genre, and whether he thinks the characters in these books will be remembered as fondly as characters such as Ramona and Beezus?


message 7: by Betsy (new)

Betsy | 13 comments Catherine wrote: "Graphic novels are very popular in my fifth grade classes. Handy mentions Cleary's characters leading the way for more recent characters such as Junie B. Jones, Judy Moody, and Greg Heffley. "Diary..."

Great question about graphic novels. Our sophomores read American Born Chinese, and it's one of the books they remember fondly from the course. I'm with you--if it gets someone to read. In a similar way, I was recently listening to a book (Killers of the Flower Moon) and I HATED the reader. I had to stop listening. A friend of mine then told me that she really enjoyed the hard copy of the book because of the photos. DUH! I did the same thing with Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children. On the flipside, I read an article recently about children's stories becoming the new thing in podcasting. Interesting thought . . .


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