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message 1: by Abby (new)

Abby | 84 comments We love to hear what everyone has been reading! It's such a great way to find new books to read and discuss the ones you've already read. Please share in the comments your most recent reads!

I just finished reading The Longest Winter by Alex Kershaw. It's the story of WWII's most decorated platoon. They came under heavy fire at the start of the Battle of the Bulge and managed to keep the Germans from advancing for over 12 hours. They finally surrendered after running out of ammunition and became POWs. It was an interesting book and one that I had been meaning to read for awhile now.

The Longest Winter The Battle of the Bulge and the Epic Story of World War II's Most Decorated Platoon by Alex Kershaw


message 2: by Kelly (last edited Oct 06, 2017 08:45AM) (new)

Kelly | 45 comments I just finished reading Restoring Grace by Katie Fforde. I picked it up because it had been compared to Jane Austen and reviewers said Fforde's writing had an old-fashioned feel to it. I would describe the book as a light romance.

The story is focused on the friendship between two women--Grace, a divorcee living in a huge mansion by herself who can't seem to get over her ex-husband and Ellie, a young artist who is pregnant and needs a place to stay after realizing she no longer loves the man she's with. Together, they help each other move on and find some romance along the way. Grace reminded me a lot of Joanne Fluke's Hannah Swensen character, so if you want a cozy romance, this book would be perfect.
Restoring Grace by Katie Fforde


message 3: by [deleted user] (new)

City tossed and broken


message 4: by Scott (new)

Scott Potter | 46 comments Mod
Just finished Ice Ghosts. I seem to like to read about Polar exploration especially if a group of explorers get stuck or lost. Maybe I need a new genre for my next book. it was a very interesting read.


message 5: by Scott (new)

Scott Potter | 46 comments Mod
I just started The second book in the Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. It is called the Girl Who Played with Fire. So far it is excellent. I am liking it more than the first one in the series but we shall see if that feeling continues.


message 6: by Karen (new)

Karen | 18 comments Abby wrote: "We love to hear what everyone has been reading! It's such a great way to find new books to read and discuss the ones you've already read. Please share in the comments your most recent reads!

I jus..."


I just finished a book you might like if you are interested in WWII nonfiction. Sons and Soldiers: The Untold Story of Jews Who Escaped the Nazis and Returned with the U.S. Army to Fight Hitler. The title pretty much explains the book. The author is Bruce Henderson.


message 7: by Marcia (new)

Marcia | 36 comments I bought that book for my son in law and he loved it. There are two books I highly recommend that are historical fiction: We Were the Lucky Ones and Beneath a Scarlet Sky. Both are about real people and their experiences during the Holocaust, one in Poland and the other takes place in Italy. The author of the first is a granddaughter who writes about her family which she did an ancestry search after learning about her grandfather. The other is the life of a young boy who worked for the underground in Italy.


message 8: by Kelly (last edited Oct 10, 2017 09:47AM) (new)

Kelly | 45 comments There's a book on my to-read list that reminds me of the World War II books you described. It's called My Grandfather Would Have Shot Me. A young woman who is half African and half-European discovers her grandfather was Amon Goeth, the evil Nazi commander depicted in Schindler's List. This causes her to question her family history and wonder how her mother could have hidden it and how her grandmother could have loved him.

My Grandfather Would Have Shot Me A Black Woman Discovers Her Family's Nazi Past by Jennifer Teege


message 9: by Hari (new)

Hari I, too, enjoyed We Were the Lucky Ones!

I most recently read The Saboteur by Andrew Gross. In his latest novel, Gross constructs an edge-of-your-seat story based on a real mission undertaken by the Allies’ Grouse and Gunnerside teams in Norway during World War II. As the Nazis raced ahead with making the heavy water necessary to create an atomic bomb, the Allies plotted and trained elite teams, one comprised of Norwegians and an American, to destroy the factory. To get into Norway where the factory operated, these men parachuted into some of the most treacherous terrain in Europe and endured fierce mountain storms and overwhelming odds to accomplish the impossible.

This riveting tale of resourcefulness and courage brings history to life and makes it hard to put the book down. The author’s notes at the end provide some historical information about the mission and team members.
The Saboteur by Andrew Gross

I'm currently about 2/3 through Stephen and Owen King's Sleeping Beauties and am thoroughly enjoying it!
Sleeping Beauties by Stephen King


message 10: by Abby (last edited Oct 11, 2017 04:22PM) (new)

Abby | 84 comments Scott wrote: "Just finished Ice Ghosts. I seem to like to read about Polar exploration especially if a group of explorers get stuck or lost. Maybe I need a new genre for my next book. it was a very interesting r..."

I haven't read this one yet but I'm sure I'll be picking it up soon!

Ice Ghosts The Epic Hunt for the Lost Franklin Expedition by Paul Watson


message 11: by Abby (last edited Oct 11, 2017 04:23PM) (new)

Abby | 84 comments Karen wrote: " I just finished a book you might like if you are interested in WWII nonfiction. Sons and Soldiers: The Untold Story of Jews Who Escaped the Nazis and Returned with the U.S. Army to Fight Hitler. The title pretty much explains the book. The author is Bruce Henderson. "

Oh that does sound interesting! I put it on request so hopefully I'll get my hands on a copy in the next few days

Sons and Soldiers The Untold Story of the Jews Who Escaped the Nazis and Returned with the U.S. Army to Fight Hitler by Bruce Henderson


message 12: by Scott (new)

Scott Potter | 46 comments Mod
After reading several non fiction in a row, I opted for a Stephen King book of short stories. Recommended by a friend. Bazaar of Bad Dreams. It is good stuff, so far.


message 13: by Kelly (new)

Kelly | 45 comments I just finished Rules of Prey by John Sandford, which is the first book in the Lucas Davenport series. At first, I wasn't sure I wasn't going to like it. The main character's a bit of a womanizer, but the writing is good, and I did find myself enjoying the action and detective part of the story.

Rules of Prey (Lucas Davenport, #1) by John Sandford


message 14: by Hari (new)

Hari There's a lot to like about the Prey series and the main character, Lucas Davenport, and his cohorts, especially Virgil Flowers, who now has his own series. The books only get better. I look forward to each new installment.


message 15: by Kelly (new)

Kelly | 45 comments Hari wrote: "There's a lot to like about the Prey series and the main character, Lucas Davenport, and his cohorts, especially Virgil Flowers, who now has his own series. The books only get better. I look forwar..."

That's good to know. I probably won't start reading the rest of the series right now, but I think I wouldn't mind finishing it some day.


message 16: by Marcia (new)

Marcia | 36 comments I just finished Killers of the Flower Moon the Osage Murders and the birth of the FBI by David Grann. It is a shame that our government has this blight on this nation. The information is so mesmerizing you can't stop. Reads like a non-fiction mystery.


message 17: by Hari (new)

Hari I'd heard only good things about this book. It's on my TBR list (near the top). I know it's going to hurt my heart, though...


message 18: by Scott (new)

Scott Potter | 46 comments Mod
On largely Abby's recommendation I jumped into Lost City of the Monkey God. Almost finished with it and I am enjoying it very much. I think it is mush better than Preston's other book I read entitled Monster of Florence.


message 19: by [deleted user] (new)

I recently started reading Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone, which has been on my TBR list for quite some time. I love the films and am really enjoying the book so far!


message 20: by Marcia (new)

Marcia | 36 comments I just finished Finding Jake. A relevant fictional story about the nightmare a parent goes through when his son is s suspect in a school mass shooting. A very good book and it is a real lesson on how this tragedy affects everyone


message 21: by Vita (new)

Vita | 40 comments Mod
I am a fan of the Shetland Jimmy Perez mysteries by Ann Cleeves. Started the Peter May Lewis Man trilogy recently; enjoying the mystery series. I also like Cleeves Vera Stanhope series too.


message 22: by Kelly (new)

Kelly | 45 comments Nichole wrote: "I recently started reading Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone, which has been on my TBR list for quite some time. I love the films and am really enjoying the book so far!"

That's great! Because I was reading them as they were coming out, I feel I probably missed a lot in between readings. Someday I'd like to go back and reread them all at once.


message 23: by Kelly (new)

Kelly | 45 comments Marcia wrote: "I just finished Finding Jake. A relevant fictional story about the nightmare a parent goes through when his son is s suspect in a school mass shooting. A very good book and it is a real lesson on h..."

Sounds like a timely yet tragic story. I don't know if you've read it, but a mother of one of the Columbine shooters wrote a book last year called A Mother's Reckoning. One of my old co-workers went to high school with her. It could be a good follow up read to your book.
A Mother's Reckoning Living in the Aftermath of Tragedy by Sue Klebold


message 24: by Marcia (new)

Marcia | 36 comments Just finished The Switch by Joseph Finder. A great thriller that will keep you on the edge of your seat. It starts when a senator gets her laptop switched and the innocent person who gets caught in the middle. Top secret plans by NSA are on it and many people are interested in getting them.


message 25: by Kelly (new)

Kelly | 45 comments I'm currently reading A Talent for Murder by Andrew Wilson. It's based on the true 10 day disappearance of Agatha Christie in 1926, the mystery of which is still unsolved today! It's been an enjoyable read so far and is very reminiscent of a classic mystery.
A Talent for Murder by Andrew Wilson


message 26: by Hari (new)

Hari Marcia wrote: "Just finished The Switch by Joseph Finder. A great thriller that will keep you on the edge of your seat. It starts when a senator gets her laptop switched and the innocent person who gets caught in..." I've requested this book; it sounds great!


message 27: by Scott (new)

Scott Potter | 46 comments Mod
While I am not a fan of Short Stories, I loved Stephen Kings collection of short Stories entitled The Bazaar of Bad Dreams. One of my favorite stories - that ranks among one of best in my opinion - is in this book. The short story called "Blockade Billy" was outstanding. I listened to some of the stories on audio-book, the readers really added to the story!


message 28: by [deleted user] (new)

Kelly wrote: "I'm currently reading A Talent for Murder by Andrew Wilson. It's based on the true 10 day disappearance of Agatha Christie in 1926, the mystery of which is still unsolved today! It's been an enjoya..."

This sounds so interesting, Kelly! I am definitely adding it to my TBR shelf.


message 29: by Marcia (new)

Marcia | 36 comments I also want to add it to my tar shelf


message 30: by Grace (last edited Nov 28, 2017 03:28PM) (new)

Grace (grace_millerpark_uapl) | 2 comments I just finished The Art of Rivalry: Four Friendships, Betrayals, and Breakthroughs in Modern Art by Sebastian Smee via audiobook, and it was incredible! Was like listening to one of the most interesting art history lectures you can imagine, with the highlights, juicy stuff, and relationships among the big names of each time period the focus. But still super educational and entertainingly written. Great reminder that our favorite artists weren't working in a vacuum, and they motivated one another through both friendships, and rivalry. Really great!

The Art of Rivalry Four Friendships, Betrayals, and Breakthroughs in Modern Art by Sebastian Smee


message 31: by Marcia (new)

Marcia | 36 comments Just finished Alone by Lisa Harper. This is one of her first mystery books and it is very current on what is happening in the world. There are many twists and turns and a surprise ending. It was very thought provoking and I am still thinking about it. If you like Baldacci I would say she is the female version. I have read 5 of her books and loved all of them


message 32: by Hari (new)

Hari That sounds fascinating! One more "book" to add to my TBLt list.


message 33: by Jen (new)

Jen (librarianjen) | 11 comments Mod
I'm late to the game, but am reading A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman for a book discussion I'm leading later this month. I'm about halfway through and really enjoying it thus far.


message 34: by Marcia (new)

Marcia | 36 comments You need to see the Swedish movie. I saw it after I read the book at the senior center. Tom Hanks is making the American version.


message 35: by Susan (new)

Susan | 12 comments Just finished “X” by Sue Grafton. It looks like “Y” is partially continued from “X” so I will be reading “Y” next. Then finishing books I started this year but never got around to finishing.


message 36: by Hari (new)

Hari I'm almost finished with Artemis by Andy Weir (of The Martian fame). The main character shares some of Mark Watney's traits, including smart and irreverent. But unlike Mark, is a female! She can be grating where Mark was endearing but it's nice to have a capable (if occasionally foolish) female lead. Even though I've enjoyed Artemis, The Martian is still my favorite.


message 37: by Abby (new)

Abby | 84 comments Hari wrote: "I'm almost finished with Artemis by Andy Weir (of The Martian fame). The main character shares some of Mark Watney's traits, including smart and irreverent. But unlike Mark, is a female! She can be..."
I'm on the list for this book but haven't gotten it yet. I am really looking forward to it!!


message 38: by Marcia (new)

Marcia | 36 comments Just finished the Handmaid's Tale. I had never read it before. It is chilling and is just as relevant today if not more than when it was written. It is a read you must get if you have never read it before.


message 39: by Grace (new)

Grace (grace_millerpark_uapl) | 2 comments Marcia wrote: "Just finished the Handmaid's Tale. I had never read it before. It is chilling and is just as relevant today if not more than when it was written. It is a read you must get if you have never read it..."

Consider Alias Grace next - another M Atwood work and while very different in content, it definitely has her style and is a great read so far. I'm about 1/4 way through and can't read it fast enough. It's another that's been/being turned into a TV series as well I believe. Though I haven't watched any of the Handmaid's episodes, only read the book.


message 40: by Abby (new)

Abby | 84 comments I read the Handmaid's Tale years ago and found it to be incredible thought provoking. With the television series out now I've been thinking about rereading it but haven't yet found the time. I've never read any other works by Atwood but I'm glad to hear that Alias Grace is a page turner!

The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood Alias Grace by Margaret Atwood


message 41: by Hari (new)

Hari The Handmaid's Tale slipped past me when it first came out. I will remedy that and add it (and Alias Grace) to my ever-growing TBR list.


message 42: by Vita (new)

Vita | 40 comments Mod
Finishing Peter May's Lewis Trilogy, reading Chessmen, almost done! I like Ann Cleeves Shetland series and found the Lewis Trilogy a similar mystery.


message 43: by Vita (new)

Vita | 40 comments Mod
I have read Richard Nottingham Mysteries by Chris Nickson, set in Leeds around the early 1700's and recently found a similar style, "The Masque of a Murderer" by Susanna Calkins. Her books are set in London around 1666, after the Great Fire in London.


message 44: by [deleted user] (new)

Hari wrote: "I'm almost finished with Artemis by Andy Weir (of The Martian fame). The main character shares some of Mark Watney's traits, including smart and irreverent. But unlike Mark, is a female! She can be..."

I just took home the audiobook version of Artemis, which is how I also enjoyed The Martian. If you haven't listened to The Martian, I highly recommend you doing so because it takes the experience to a different level. I definitely have my hopes up for Artemis, but I'm not sure it could ever beat the journey of Mark Watney.


message 45: by Scott (last edited Dec 05, 2017 09:52AM) (new)

Scott Potter | 46 comments Mod
Abby wrote: "We love to hear what everyone has been reading! It's such a great way to find new books to read and discuss the ones you've already read. Please share in the comments your most recent reads!

I jus..."


Abby wrote: "We love to hear what everyone has been reading! It's such a great way to find new books to read and discuss the ones you've already read. Please share in the comments your most recent reads!

I jus..."


I was just browsing the history section and came across this book that you mentioned "The Longest Winter"..... I like Kershaw's writing and will probably enjoy this one. But I have not started it - like a lot of us - I have too many in line!


message 46: by Abby (new)

Abby | 84 comments Nichole wrote: "Hari wrote: "I'm almost finished with Artemis by Andy Weir (of The Martian fame). The main character shares some of Mark Watney's traits, including smart and irreverent. But unlike Mark, is a femal..."

I have been impatiently waiting for my copy to come in and you guys that already have your copies are making me so jealous!


message 47: by [deleted user] (new)

I am currently reading Axeman of New Orleans: The True Story by Miriam C. Davis. I was first introduced to the Axeman through the popular tv show American Horror Story: Coven, where there is a character loosely portrayed on the true killer. So far it's an interesting read!

The Axeman of New Orleans: The True Story


message 48: by [deleted user] (new)

I am reading the Racketeer for the first and only time.


message 49: by Scott (last edited Jul 03, 2018 06:48AM) (new)

Scott Potter | 46 comments Mod
I just finished Ursula K. Le Guin's book on Writing. A fascinating look into an award-winning author's mind. I found her insights very interesting


message 50: by Nolan (new)

Nolan I am thoroughly immersed in Lisa Scottoline‘s accused: A Rosato and Associates Novel. A young black man has been accused of the murder of a 16-year-old girl while serving as a caterer at her birthday party. The murdered girls genius sister, several years younger, believes he is innocent. So does Mary DiNunzio, A newly minted partner in the law firm. But the murdered girl’s parents are keenly interested in keeping the case closed and in keeping the young black man in prison. Scottoline’s writing style is wonderfully compelling. This is not the first book I have read from her, but it is definitely a solid contender for one of the best. If you are looking for something to read between the bursting of fireworks, this really could be your book!


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