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2017 > The Woman in White: Week Two

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message 1: by Marie (last edited Oct 03, 2017 11:47PM) (new)

Marie Williams | 713 comments Mod
Upon realizing he and Laura's feelings, Marian advises Walter to leave Limmeridge. Laura receives an anonymous letter warning her against marrying Glyde. Walter deduces that Anne has sent the letter and encounters her again in Cumberland. He becomes convinced that Glyde originally placed Anne in the asylum. Despite the misgivings of the family lawyer over the financial terms of the marriage settlement, which will give the entirety of Laura's fortune to Glyde if she dies without leaving an heir, and Laura's confession that she loves another man, Laura and Glyde marry in December 1849 and travel to Italy for six months. Unable to accept his feelings over Laura's marriage, Walter leaves for Honduras.


message 2: by Piyangie (new)

Piyangie I was really surprised that Laura and Marian agreed with the marriage settlement on which Percival Glyde insisted. Surely that would account for his greed and showed the motivation for his marriage of her.


message 3: by Marie (new)

Marie Williams | 713 comments Mod
Piyangie wrote: "I was really surprised that Laura and Marian agreed with the marriage settlement on which Percival Glyde insisted. Surely that would account for his greed and showed the motivation for his marriage..."

One would think. Common sense would say when even the lawyer is shocked, it might be a good idea to reconsider, but apparently not.


message 4: by Piyumi (new)

Piyumi | 57 comments These particular plot developments was where I had issues with to begin with.
But recall how their male guardian just brushes of the ladies' concerns and begs them to not trouble him with these petty issues because of cause Glyde is a man and Laura should be glad and appropriate that a man wants to take care of her on any terms. If I remember right, he even goes on to scold Marian as to questioning a man's, a superior in every way to a woman (Ha! fat chance), suggestions.
And given the time the story is set and how females were treated and how they had no say in anything, let alone the course of their own life trajectory, how can anyone be surprised that the ladies went ahead with the marriage settlement. They had NO choice, and that's the underlining message by Collins.
Collins is a man writing about women's rights or lack of it and you will mostly get a male point of view. But the good thing about Collins is that he created an annoying plot line where two sensible women agreed to a mad marriage settlement to put light on the plight of women back then, and sadly its still very much relevant with the on-slaughter of the Harvey Weinstein horror story.
I love Collins and male authors who were ahead of their times for show casing women's plight.
Even the way he boldly described Marian's looks and basically said she is ugly is so ahead of his time. Even there he is putting out the message of discrimination, because see what a strong and sensible and even loving devoted women SHE is painted to be. Says so much about Collins. To me she was the heroine and I think Collins secretly wanted the same, since he gave her so much of the best story points. Well I like to think so :)


message 5: by Piyangie (new)

Piyangie Well I agree with Piyumi that with Mr. Fairlie as guradian of Laura, she and Marian had no chance to stand against Glyde's wishes. Even the lawyer was legally bound to follow the wishes of the guardian as Laura was not of age. But my issue was why she did not wait few months till she comes of age and decides for herself. Glyde (though slyly) allowed a little room for Laura to decide on the date of their marraige. Marian should have definitely encouraged Laura to wait till she is of age.
Although you cannot judge Laura's and Marian's conduct from a contemporary view point given the social conventions that governed the Victorian society, I still think they did not act prudently.
But on the other hand, if that has happened the whole plot will become pointless as Collins agenda was to weave a story refelcting the women's position in the society both socially and legally. He was critical of the insufficient legal provisions in English legal system to protect women and their inheritance against greedy husbands, relatives etc. and wanted to point out the dangers such women face because of such insufficient protection.


Linda Abhors the New GR Design | 531 comments Piyangie wrote: "Well I agree with Piyumi that with Mr. Fairlie as guradian of Laura, she and Marian had no chance to stand against Glyde's wishes. Even the lawyer was legally bound to follow the wishes of the guar..."

I'm only halfway through this part, so have just finished Hartwright's part. Was debating on whether or not to pipe in on the thread until I'd finished the section, but now know that Laura goes through with the marriage.
But isn't all of this championing of women odd, considering that Collins had umpteen mistresses?!


Linda Abhors the New GR Design | 531 comments I'm also struck by the imagery in the novel; in the scene where Hartwright last looks down upon her walking in the garden, with a brown shawl and a black dress and straw hat, the little greyhound wearing a scarlet sweater, I thought, "I could see this as a painting, with autumn leaves in the background." And I don't paint! I almost think that the imagery is on the level of Woolf's "To the Lighthouse", but we no longer have the light, breezy, airy Impressionist painting.


message 8: by Piyumi (new)

Piyumi | 57 comments Linda Abhors the New GR Design wrote: "I'm also struck by the imagery in the novel; in the scene where Hartwright last looks down upon her walking in the garden, with a brown shawl and a black dress and straw hat, the little greyhound w..."

Oh nice point there Linda and I like you link up with the imagery of To the LIghthouse as that was one of the many things I liked about To the Lighthouse and Woman in White, now come to think of it :)
yes it can be a painting!


Linda Abhors the New GR Design | 531 comments Piyumi wrote: "Linda Abhors the New GR Design wrote: "I'm also struck by the imagery in the novel; in the scene where Hartwright last looks down upon her walking in the garden, with a brown shawl and a black dres..."

There have been several moments where I was left with a very clear image in my mind....:)


message 10: by Piyumi (new)

Piyumi | 57 comments Linda Abhors the New GR Design wrote: "Piyumi wrote: "Linda Abhors the New GR Design wrote: "I'm also struck by the imagery in the novel; in the scene where Hartwright last looks down upon her walking in the garden, with a brown shawl a..."

:D


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