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Picture of the Day > October 2017

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message 1: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl

The Artist's Family, 1927
Otto Dix (German 1891-1969)
Oil on wood
80 × 50 cm
Städel Museum, Frankfurt

(view spoiler)


message 2: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (stewartry) | 0 comments Holy crap.


message 3: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl

Study of a Woman in Red, early 1890s
Jean-Jacques Henner (French 1829-1905)
Oil on canvas
55 x 38 cm
Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia


message 4: by Lobstergirl (last edited Oct 03, 2017 11:26PM) (new)

Lobstergirl

Red Coat, 1983
Alex Katz (American b. 1927)
Screenprint
58 x 29" (147.3 x 73.7 cm)
MOMA, NYC


message 5: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey Aronson (geaaronson) | 930 comments Red comes to the forefront. Striking piece, somewhat straddling illustration and painting.


message 6: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1890 comments Typical Alex Katz.


message 7: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl

Untitled (self-portrait), 1967
Robert Mapplethorpe (American 1946-1989)
Gelatin silver print, graphite, transparent red plastic, tape
9 5/16 x 7 11/16 in. (23.7 x 19.5 cm)
LACMA


message 8: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1890 comments Ooh, I like that. And very different from Mapplethorpe's usual cool formalism in black and white.


message 9: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8273 comments Lobstergirl wrote: "The Artist's Family, 1927
Otto Dix (German 1891-1969)
Oil on wood
80 × 50 cm
Städel Museum, Frankfurt

Otto Dix was one of the protagonists of “New Objectivity”, a style already thus referred to in..."


Tracey wrote: "Holy crap."

Ditto! That's almost evil!


message 10: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8273 comments Lobstergirl wrote: "Study of a Woman in Red, early 1890s
Jean-Jacques Henner (French 1829-1905)
Oil on canvas
55 x 38 cm
Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia"


Wow, I guess I've seen this in other paintings but not paid as much attention to them. But the whole essence of the painting is...'soft'. Her hair looks smooth and silky, her robe or dress looks very cuddly and comfortable, the placement of her hand looks very soft and feminine, and even her skin looks well moisturized. It is a 'cozy' piece. IMO

Ooh! I'm still staring at it, and what is that look? What is she looking at? With her hand being placed looking like she's almost drawing attention to her breasts, her eyes seem to have a 'come on' look to an unseen person in front of her.

Does anyone else see that?


message 11: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8273 comments Geoffrey wrote: "Red comes to the forefront. Striking piece, somewhat straddling illustration and painting."

Yes, very red


message 12: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8273 comments Lobstergirl wrote: "

Untitled (self-portrait), 1967
Robert Mapplethorpe (American 1946-1989)
Gelatin silver print, graphite, transparent red plastic, tape
9 5/16 x 7 11/16 in. (23.7 x 19.5 cm)
LACMA"


I'm with Ruth, I really like this! But I also think it would be a great book cover for a psychopathic novel. It's his eyes, I think.


message 13: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey Aronson (geaaronson) | 930 comments Never cared for Mapplethorpe´s work. I have no objection to the subject matter, I just don´t find his technique particularly original or creative. Cindy Sherman agrees with me. Most recently she was asked to partake of a documentary on his life and she refused, attesting that she didn´t think him a very good artist. Thank you Cindy.


message 14: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl The Dix portrait is heavily influenced by Cranach. The baby and father in particular.


message 15: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl

Execution by Firing Squad (Red Jacket), 1919
Heinrich Ehmsen (German 1886-1963)
Oil on canvas
109,5 x 135 cm
Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia


message 16: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (stewartry) | 0 comments Geoffrey wrote: "Red comes to the forefront. Striking piece, somewhat straddling illustration and painting."

Surprisingly, a good number of illustrators actually paint.


message 17: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl

Tempo in Red Major, 1942
Carlos Merida (Guatemalan 1891-1985)
Crayon on colored paper
17 7/8 x 24" (45.4 x 61.0 cm)
MOMA, NYC


message 18: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (stewartry) | 0 comments It's surprising how three-dimensional the figures look with just the red swatches; it's all about the placement, I guess.

It makes me want to wave back; they seem friendly - maybe because they're pink?


message 19: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl They do seem friendly, although maybe they are shaking their fists like the two gents in #17.


message 20: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey Aronson (geaaronson) | 930 comments Luís wrote: "Heather wrote: "Lobstergirl wrote: "

Untitled (self-portrait), 1967
Robert Mapplethorpe (American 1946-1989)
Gelatin silver print, graphite, transparent red plastic, tape
9 5/16 x 7 11/16 in. (23...."

If so, I always suspected him to be schizophrenic.


message 21: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl

Deep Breath in White Bathroom with Orange Lighting and Red Falling Jean Pants, 2003
Christian Holstad (American b. 1972)
Cut-and-pasted printed paper on paper
11 5/8 x 11 1/2" (29.5 x 29.2 cm)
MOMA, NYC


message 22: by Geoffrey (last edited Oct 08, 2017 12:11AM) (new)

Geoffrey Aronson (geaaronson) | 930 comments What can we say aboug this one? Pretty graphic. Much better than Mappie´s work artistically but wouldn´t want to hang it on my walls. I suspect you´re testing me for hypocrisy.


message 23: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey Aronson (geaaronson) | 930 comments Thanks for posting this LG. The tecnique is somewhat similar to my own and opens up some possibilities for my portfolio.


message 24: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl

Victime, 1943-46
Stanley William Hayter (British 1901-1988)
Oil on canvas
36 x 60 in. (91.5 x 152.4 cm.)
Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C.

(view spoiler)


message 25: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey Aronson (geaaronson) | 930 comments It´s good to see a Brit doing some exciting work. What I have seen of the British art scene hasn´t impressed me.


message 26: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl

Dress, Spring/Summer 2015
Rei Kawakubo, Comme des Garçons (Japanese b. 1942)
(a) wool, nylon, polyester, cotton (b) polyurethane, polyester, cotton (c) polyester, cotton, (d, e) cotton, synthetic, and (e, f) synthetic
Met Museum, NYC


message 27: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1890 comments This image makes me shiver. I’ve been watching The Handmaid’s Tale.


message 28: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (stewartry) | 0 comments I was trying to figure out if those were panniers, and if (how) it was wearable - and it is (briefly, at least:



Yup, panniers. The wig sells it as a modernistic Marie Antoinette.

It's part of quite the collection:
http://styleblazer.com/328612/pfw-run...

I like the take on Red Riding Hood.


message 29: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl

Continuous on Red, 1960
Alexander Liberman (American 1912-1999)
Oil on canvas
6' 8" (203 cm) in diameter
MOMA, NYC


message 30: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey Aronson (geaaronson) | 930 comments A great design for a DVD


message 31: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl

Red Span, 1964
Thomas Downing (American 1928-1985)
Acrylic
28 1/8 x 28 1/8 in. (71.5 x 71.4 cm)
Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C.


message 32: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1890 comments Wow!


message 33: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (stewartry) | 0 comments It's an extreme close up of a parrot's eye!


message 34: by Geoffrey (last edited Oct 13, 2017 01:37PM) (new)

Geoffrey Aronson (geaaronson) | 930 comments No, Tracey, it´s two curves looking for a straight line. That´s so obvious.


message 35: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl

Woman's shoes, Qing dynasty (1644-1911), 19th century
China
Blue and red sateen, gilt trim
a. 8.3 x 14 x 5 cm (3 1/4 x 5 1/2 x 2 in.)
b. 13.3 x 14.6 x 7.4 cm (5 1/4 x 5 3/4 x 2 7/8 in.)
Art Institute of Chicago


message 36: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1890 comments No, Luis. The shoes of cruelty, malformity, and subjugation.


message 37: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl

Self-Portrait, 1902
Gwen John (British 1876–1939)
Oil on canvas
44.8 x 34.9 cm
Tate Gallery, London


message 38: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey Aronson (geaaronson) | 930 comments She´s a bit emotionally repressed?


message 39: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (stewartry) | 0 comments Not wearing that shade of red, I think.


message 40: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1890 comments Wasn’t she part of the Bloomsbury group? I’ve always found them fascinating.


message 41: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl Geoffrey wrote: "She´s a bit emotionally repressed?"

Because she's a woman looking pensive? Sounds pretty knee-jerk sexist. It also sounds like a phrase from the 50s. No one talks this way anymore.


message 42: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl

Frontal Passage, 1994
James Turrell (American b. 1943)
Light
12' 10" x 22' 6" x 34' (391.2 x 685.8 x 1036.3 cm)
MOMA, NYC

(view spoiler)


message 43: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey Aronson (geaaronson) | 930 comments Lobstergirl wrote: "Geoffrey wrote: "She´s a bit emotionally repressed?"

Because she's a woman looking pensive? Sounds pretty knee-jerk sexist. It also sounds like a phrase from the 50s. No one talks this way anymore."


You don´t travel in psychology circles, it´s apparent. I would appreciate it if there wasn´t any name calling.


message 44: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl And I would appreciate it if you wouldn't call Gwen John emotionally repressed based on no evidence at all.


message 45: by Lobstergirl (last edited Oct 16, 2017 08:16PM) (new)

Lobstergirl

Red X, 1966
John Mason (American b. 1927)
Stoneware
58 1/2 x 59 1/2 x 17 in. (148.59 x 151.13 x 43.18 cm)
LACMA, Los Angeles


message 46: by Heather, Moderator (last edited Oct 17, 2017 03:37AM) (new)

Heather | 8273 comments Not necessarily pointing fingers, but in general let's all try to be less offended by another person's comments, but primarily, it would be great if there were no posts which would cause offense. I understand there can be miscommunication in some cases, but we should think of other view points before commenting on our own perceptions which could cause offense to others. (And I will admit I am not infallible to this request either)

When one is offended and feels it needs to be addressed, tact is always useful in dissolving further dispute, right? (name calling should be avoided in all circumstances)

But I will conclude with saying overall, I am still proud and impressed with our group of adult intellectuals where little offense needs commentary. You are all great!

We'll end it here. Friends?!?!


message 47: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8273 comments Lobstergirl wrote: "Frontal Passage, 1994
James Turrell (American b. 1943)
Light
12' 10" x 22' 6" x 34' (391.2 x 685.8 x 1036.3 cm)
MOMA, NYC

Throughout history, the artist has been a shaper of matter, whether the pi..."



I have never seen anything like this, and especially after I read the spoiler! It is wonderful!


message 48: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8273 comments Lobstergirl wrote: "Red X, 1966
John Mason (American b. 1927)
Stoneware
58 1/2 x 59 1/2 x 17 in. (148.59 x 151.13 x 43.18 cm)
LACMA, Los Angeles"


I'm sure some or many people in this group could answer this, but this "Red X" being done as recently as 1966, are those cracks in it intentional? If so, what is their purpose?


message 49: by Geoffrey (new)

Geoffrey Aronson (geaaronson) | 930 comments I put a question mark at the end of that sentence. I raised the question but you took it as a declaration. Please don´t jump to erroneous conclusions.
Again, I object to your personal attack. That is hardly worthy of you.


message 50: by Lobstergirl (new)

Lobstergirl Heather wrote: "this "Red X" being done as recently as 1966, are those cracks in it intentional? If so, what is their purpose? "

I don't know. Presumably all the dark striations are intentional, the cracks, hard to say. This is "stoneware" which is surprising since it has the appearance of painted wood.


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