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Romeo and Juliet
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Archive Plays > 2017 October Play : Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare

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message 1: by Lesle, Appalachain Bibliophile (new)

Lesle | 5770 comments Mod
Romeo and Juliet is a tragedy written by William Shakespeare early in his career about two young star-crossed lovers whose deaths ultimately reconcile their feuding families.

The play, set in Verona, Italy, begins with a street brawl between Montague and Capulet servants who, like their masters, are sworn enemies. Prince Escalus of Verona intervenes and declares that further breach of the peace will be punishable by death. Later, Count Paris talks to Capulet about marrying his daughter Juliet, but Capulet asks Paris to wait another two years and invites him to attend a planned Capulet ball. Lady Capulet and Juliet's nurse try to persuade Juliet to accept Paris's courtship.


message 2: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new) - added it

Rosemarie | 9729 comments Mod
I have read this play more than once. It has some of the most beautiful dialogue in any of Shakespeare's plays.


message 3: by Rafael, Brazilian Master of the Bookshelf! (new) - rated it 3 stars

Rafael da Silva (morfindel) | 564 comments Mod
It is a classic, and not a love story, as the name Romeo for a lover, seems to denote.

I hope that everyone who is reading it for the first time enjoys the book.


Tracey (traceyrb) | 1373 comments I read this many years ago at school but am hoping to start reading more Shakespeare and thought re-reading this would be a good start. Count me in. Can we read more Shakespeare? Maybe 2-3/year? BTW my cat is called Romeo but only because we got him from the humane society and that was already his name. We thought it was cute as he is very dramatic and vocal being a part Bengal cat so we kept the name. He responds if I call his name and talks to me so I wonder what he will do if I read the play out loud to him lol. I may find out he's a Shakespearean at heart.


message 5: by Lesle, Appalachain Bibliophile (new)

Lesle | 5770 comments Mod
Tracey, for sure!
This is our second Shakespeare. Last month was Hamlet.

We might do every other since there is a huge interest.


message 6: by Tracey (last edited Oct 02, 2017 09:38AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Tracey (traceyrb) | 1373 comments Lesle wrote: "Tracey, for sure!
This is our second Shakespeare. Last month was Hamlet.

We might do every other since there is a huge interest."


Great I would definitely be up for that. I have set myself to read all of his works over the next 5 years and I was a little daunted at the thought of doing it alone. I looked on Goodreads and there didn't seem to be other groups doing Shakespeare except one that met for real and ones that seemed no longer to be active.


message 7: by Rafael, Brazilian Master of the Bookshelf! (new) - rated it 3 stars

Rafael da Silva (morfindel) | 564 comments Mod
Next month we could be reading Macbeth. What do you think?


Tracey (traceyrb) | 1373 comments If everyone else is ready then I will be in on it. If others want to wait a month then I am good with that too. 8 a year works for my time plan. Here is my list

The complete Shakespeare and historical works relating to.
Romeo and Juliet
Thereafter:
The Early Comedies
The Comedy of Errors
The Taming of the Shrew
The Two Gentlemen of Verona

The First Histories
Henry VI, Part 1
Henry VI, Part 2
Henry VI, Part 3
King John
Richard III

The Apprentice Tragedies
Titus Andronicus
Julius Caesar

The High Comedies
Love's Labour's Lost
A Midsummer Night's Dream
The Merchant of Venice
Much Ado About Nothing
As You Like It
Twelfth Night

The Major Histories
Richard II
Henry IV, Part 1
Henry IV, Part 2
The Merry Wives of Windsor
Henry V

The 'Problem Plays'
Troilus and Cressida
All's Well That Ends Well
Measure for Measure

The Great Tragedies
Hamlet
Othello
King Lear
Macbeth
Antony and Cleopatra

Tragic Epilogue
Coriolanus
Timon of Athens

The Late Romances
Pericles
Cymbeline
The Winter's Tale
The Tempest
Henry VIII
The Two Noble Kinsmen


Tracey (traceyrb) | 1373 comments I have a question. Which edition of Shakespeare is recommended?


message 10: by Lesle, Appalachain Bibliophile (new)

Lesle | 5770 comments Mod
Tracey if you do not care I will transfer your list over to a separate thread under Plays?


message 11: by Lesle, Appalachain Bibliophile (new)

Lesle | 5770 comments Mod
Rosemarie can you answer Tracey question for msg 9?

Tracey I am sorry I am totally clueless :(


message 12: by Rafael, Brazilian Master of the Bookshelf! (new) - rated it 3 stars

Rafael da Silva (morfindel) | 564 comments Mod
I guess every one. If you read it in english there's no translator, so the text would be the same. It's your question?


message 13: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new) - added it

Rosemarie | 9729 comments Mod
Tracy, I usually get the Shakespeare plays from the library-and always try to get a British publisher- without overwhelming annotations. I prefer the notes at the back. I generally get paperbacks because they are easier to read.
Hope this helps, Tracey.
For me, the font and quality of the paper also help me decide which version to get out of the library.


Tracey (traceyrb) | 1373 comments Rosemarie wrote: "Tracy, I usually get the Shakespeare plays from the library-and always try to get a British publisher- without overwhelming annotations. I prefer the notes at the back. I generally get paperbacks b..."

I suppose what I am asking is which of them has information relevant to the play or additions that make them easier to understand in a historical context for those who might not have read them before. I am thinking long term as over time I would like to collect all the plays for my library. I am a great believer in individuals collecting great works because I know these things can get lost so easily. I was horrified to hear that the British Library was throwing out books they no longer considered worth keeping and now find the library system here seems to keep less and less of the books I am looking for and more of the latest bestseller.


Tracey (traceyrb) | 1373 comments Lesle wrote: "Tracey if you do not care I will transfer your list over to a separate thread under Plays?"

Yes that's fine. I posted it for others to use.


message 16: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new) - added it

Rosemarie | 9729 comments Mod
Tracey, if you are looking for a series to buy, the Arden Shakespeare series are lovely, informative paperback versions of his plays. They are available for purchase on-line.


message 17: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new) - added it

Rosemarie | 9729 comments Mod
As I said earlier, I have read Romeo and Juliet more than once. My favourite character has always been Mercutio.
There have also been movie versions of the play, other writers have been inspired by this play, operas and musicals as well, the most notable being West Side Story.


message 18: by Rafael, Brazilian Master of the Bookshelf! (new) - rated it 3 stars

Rafael da Silva (morfindel) | 564 comments Mod
I read the first Act.

The drama is not began yet.


message 19: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new) - added it

Rosemarie | 9729 comments Mod
Watch out for Act Three. One of my university professors said that in Act 3 of a five-act play, you can tell if it is going to be a comedy or a tragedy. In Act 3 we find out why.


message 20: by Rafael, Brazilian Master of the Bookshelf! (new) - rated it 3 stars

Rafael da Silva (morfindel) | 564 comments Mod
I don't know if this feature (that I will tell) belongs to the play or if it is a thing of my edition (I am not a reader of a lot of plays), but in the introduction of the play there's an "abstract" of the whole play. Even if someone not knew the play (and the end) they would know when read this introduction.


message 21: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new) - added it

Rosemarie | 9729 comments Mod
I usually read the introduction after I have read the book, or play, because some times it gives away the ending.


Tracey (traceyrb) | 1373 comments My thoughts as we read Shakespeare;
a. How does this play influence us today?
b. Does it teach us about the time period and morality of the time?
c. Are there quotes from it that are found frequently in modern day literature or speech?
d. What was Shakespeare's aim in writing this play and did he achieve it?
e. Do you see it as important that people continue to read Shakespeare? Why?


Linda (lindy-lou) | 5 comments Tracey wrote: "My thoughts as we read Shakespeare;
a. How does this play influence us today?
b. Does it teach us about the time period and morality of the time?
c. Are there quotes from it that are found freque..."

One of the most helpful approaches to this work was one I heard on the ChopBard podcast. Ehren Ziegler described it as the equivalent of our summer blockbuster films. The play is entertainment. It also features young emotionally (here's my term) overwrought teenagers. This viewpoint helps me to appreciate the play.


message 24: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new) - added it

Rosemarie | 9729 comments Mod
Which character said the following famous line?

A Plague on both your houses!


message 25: by Blueberry (new) - added it

Blueberry (blueberry1) | 840 comments Rosemarie wrote: "Which character said the following famous line?

A Plague on both your houses!"


Mercutio I think. Three times.


message 26: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new) - added it

Rosemarie | 9729 comments Mod
It certainly was. Mercutio was definitely in the wrong place at the wrong time.


message 27: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (last edited Oct 12, 2017 10:41AM) (new) - added it

Rosemarie | 9729 comments Mod
Goodnight Desdemona (Good Morning Juliet) is a comedy written by Ann-Marie MacDonald in which
Juliet and Desdemona don't die and portrays their lives. I saw the play a couple of years ago and thought it was very funny, but it also made you think.


message 28: by [deleted user] (new)

Mercutio was collateral damage.


message 29: by Rafael, Brazilian Master of the Bookshelf! (new) - rated it 3 stars

Rafael da Silva (morfindel) | 564 comments Mod
I finished. Poor lovers! Poor families! Surely love hurts.


message 30: by [deleted user] (new)

Well done Rafa! Yes, it surely can, but fortunately not always.


Tracey (traceyrb) | 1373 comments I have just finished act 2. I read this years ago but that time I seemed to miss the sexual puns and innuendos. Shakespeare seems to be the soap opera director of the day. Made me think of that US tv series Dallas which was first broadcast in the late 70's (I am showing my age now).


message 32: by [deleted user] (new)

All he missed was having a plane crash on them. Oh, hold on, planes hadnt been invented then. A hot air balloon then ...


Tracey (traceyrb) | 1373 comments Does anyone know the supposed age of Romeo? I know Juliet is 13 soon to be 14.


Tracey (traceyrb) | 1373 comments So I am just about to start act iv. In act III Daddy Capulet is not a happy man with fair Juliet. His tirade against her is quite mean. Is this response understandable?

The sword fighting made me think of a book I have just read Kristin Lavransdatter. In that one had to beware of 'axe-wielding' Norwegians. In this beware of sword poking Veronans. What is it with these guys and their need to argue with fatal results?


Tracey (traceyrb) | 1373 comments I would like to watch a production of the plays I am reading. Any suggestions for the best one for Romeo and Juliet?


message 36: by Rafael, Brazilian Master of the Bookshelf! (new) - rated it 3 stars

Rafael da Silva (morfindel) | 564 comments Mod
Tracey wrote: "Does anyone know the supposed age of Romeo? I know Juliet is 13 soon to be 14."

This webpage do not answers our doubt, but make a point http://www.shakespearegeek.com/2006/1...

These other webpages deal with the same question (each one try to state different ages, but not so different
https://www.quora.com/How-old-are-Rom...
https://www.enotes.com/homework-help/...
https://www.enotes.com/homework-help/...

Reading these links I have discovered that the surname of Romeo in english it's Montague, in portuguese it is Montecchio (as an italian name should be), I was surprised, I always thought that in the original it was as the italian name.


Tracey (traceyrb) | 1373 comments Rafael wrote: "Tracey wrote: "Does anyone know the supposed age of Romeo? I know Juliet is 13 soon to be 14."

This webpage do not answers our doubt, but make a point http://www.shakespearegeek.com/2006/1...-..."


Interesting point about the name. What Idiscovered in my reading is that Shakespeare may not have wrote exactly as we read some of his plays; for example, there may have been 3 versions and an amalgamation of these 3 may have been chosen by more recent editors.

Based on Romeo's behaviour I am guessing that he is young. Myabe not as young as Juliet but certainly late teens or early 20s at the oldest.


message 38: by [deleted user] (new)

I have seen 21 in a number of places.


message 39: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new) - added it

Rosemarie | 9729 comments Mod
Romeo is older than Juliet but only by a few years.(I think)


Tracey (traceyrb) | 1373 comments Rafael wrote: "I finished. Poor lovers! Poor families! Surely love hurts."

To love is to allow oneself to be open to great pain but also great joy.


message 41: by Rafael, Brazilian Master of the Bookshelf! (new) - rated it 3 stars

Rafael da Silva (morfindel) | 564 comments Mod
Such a poetic (and a romantic) statement! Indeed. You are right.


Tracey (traceyrb) | 1373 comments Rafael wrote: "Such a poetic (and a romantic) statement! Indeed. You are right."

Life makes poets of us all and this is why poetry speaks to our deepest part; it speaks of our common experience and humanity.

One of the things I love most about being in groups like this is the ability to connect with so many people from different countries and cultures and of different ages. We connect through our shared joy of the written word and in doing so find that we connect and are alike in so many other ways. It makes differences between us seem so small and the very idea of being opposed or at war with one another like a madness.


message 43: by Catherine (new)

Catherine Habbie Well said!


message 44: by Rosemarie, Northern Roaming Scholar (new) - added it

Rosemarie | 9729 comments Mod
So true, Tracey.


message 45: by Lesle, Appalachain Bibliophile (new)

Lesle | 5770 comments Mod
Enjoyed your prospective Tracey!


message 46: by Rafael, Brazilian Master of the Bookshelf! (new) - rated it 3 stars

Rafael da Silva (morfindel) | 564 comments Mod
I agree with Tracey about the GR.


Tracey (traceyrb) | 1373 comments Maybe we should only vote for politicians and leaders who have a good reputation on Goodreads :)
'And my first question Mr. President/Prime Minister, is how long have you been on Goodreads?'
(I am not offering myself for such 'duty' but maybe a person not seeking it would make a good advocate of the people instead of those that have their own agenda.)


message 48: by [deleted user] (new)

I think a good leader needs many qualities, but certainly being on Goodreads would be a good indicator.


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