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Wilkie Collins Collection > The Woman in White: Spoilers – 4th Qtr 2017 Read-along

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message 1: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9267 comments Mod
The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins is our 2017 4th Quarter Long Read Selection.

Previous Group Reads:
Revisit the Shelf Reread, November 2014
Old School Classic Group Read, April 2013


message 2: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9267 comments Mod
You can read this book for free:
Project Gutenberg: http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/583
Google Books: https://books.google.com/books?id=UoJ...
Full Books: http://www.fullbooks.com/The-Woman-in...
Public Bookshelf: http://www.publicbookshelf.com/romant...

Kindle Store and several other places too.

You can listen for free on LibriVox: https://archive.org/details/woman_whi...
And watch on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TAMJU...

Also there is an IOS game: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/victo...


message 3: by Katy, New School Classics (last edited Sep 30, 2017 10:09PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9267 comments Mod
We will also be using the previous book threads:

The Woman in White - NO Spoilers
The Woman in White - Spoilers -- Entire Book


message 4: by Katy, New School Classics (last edited Sep 30, 2017 08:04PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9267 comments Mod
The Woman in White was originally serialized in All the Year Round starting in 1859. (All page numbers are from this edition: The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins )

Installments and dates: From Appendix C in the Penguin Classic Edition
1: Nov 26, 1859 – Concludes with (p. 31) end of Part IV
2: Dec 3, 1859 – Concludes with (p. 48) end of Part VII
3: Dec 10, 1859 – Concludes with (p. 63) end of Part VIII
4: Dec 17, 1859 – Concludes with (p. 77) end of Part X
5: Dec 24, 1859 – Concludes with (p. 93) end of Part XII
6: Dec 31, 1859 – Concludes with (p. 107) end of Part XIII
7: Jan 7, 1860 – Concludes with (p. 126) end of Part XV
8: Jan 14, 1860 – Concludes with (p. 146) end of Part II
9: Jan 21, 1860 – Concludes with (p. 161) end of Part IV
10: Jan 28, 1860 – Concludes with (p. 179) end of Part I
11: Feb 4, 1860 – Concludes with (p. 195) end of Part II
12: Feb 11, 1860 – Concludes with (p. 210) end of Part I
13: Feb 18, 1860 – Concludes with (p. 225) end of Part II
14: Feb 25, 1860 – Concludes with (p. 241) end of Part III
15: Mar 3, 1860 – Concludes with (p. 256) end of Part IV
16: Mar 10, 1860 – Concludes with (p. 266) end of Part III
17: Mar 17, 1860 – Concludes with (p. 275) after ‘Anne Catherick’
18: Mar 24, 1860 – Concludes with (p. 288) end of Part VI
19: Mar 31, 1860 – Concludes with (p. 302) end of Part VII
20: Apr 7, 1860 – Concludes with (p. 316) after The rain was only threatening; it had not come yet.
21: Apr 14, 1860 – Concludes with (p. 344) end of Part IX
22: Apr 21, 1860 – Concludes with (p. 347) after my tiresome sister’s foreign husband. Count Fosco.
23: Apr 28, 1860 – Concludes with (p. 61) after Had he found her?
24: May 5, 1860 – Concludes with (p. 375) end of Part I
25: May 12, 1860 – Concludes with (p. 390) after ‘Miss Halcombe, ma’am, has not left Blackwater Park, either’
26: May 19, 1860 – Concludes with (p. 411) end of 5. The Narrative of Walter Hartright
27: May 26, 1860 – Concludes with (p. 424) after the next day at Limmeridge House
28: June 2, 1860 – Concludes with (p. 439) end of Part III
29: June 9, 1860 – Concludes with (p. 451) end of Part IV
30: June 16, 1860 – Concludes with (p. 464) end of Part VI
31: June 23, 1860 – Concludes with (p. 477) end of Part VII
32: June 30, 1860 – Concludes with (p. 491) end of Part VIII
33: July 7, 1860 – Concludes with (p. 504) end of Part IX
34: July 14, 1860 – Concludes with (p. 521) end of Part X
35: July 21, 1860 – Concludes with (p. 534) after give you the answer immediately
36: July 28, 1860 – Concludes with (p. 543) end of Part I
37: Aug 4, 1860 – Concludes with (p. 555) end of Part II
38: Aug 11, 1860 – Concludes with (p. 578) end of Part III
39: Aug 18, 1860 – Concludes with (p. 598) end of Part VII
40: Aug 25, 1860 – Concludes with (p. 627) end of Part III


message 5: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9267 comments Mod
The book is divided into Three Epochs with narratives from several different points of view. Thus, you will notice that the above installment schedule has repeating Part numbers.

First Epoch
Walter Hartright: I – XV (1-15)
Vincent Gilmore: I – IV (1-4)
Marian Halcombe: I & II (1 & 2)

Second Epoch
Marian Halcombe: I – X (1-10)
Eliza Michelson: I & II (1 & 2)
Several Narratives:
1. Hester Pinhorn
2. The Doctor
3. Jane Gould
4. The Tombstone
5. Walter Hartright

Third Epoch
Walter Hartright: I – XI (1 -11)
Mrs. Catherick
Walter Hartright: I – VII (1 – 7)
The Count
The Story Concluded by Walter Hartright: I – III (1 – 3)

Appendix A: Theatrical Adaption of The Woman in White
Appendix B: Wilkie Collins on the Composition of The Woman in White


message 6: by Katy, New School Classics (last edited Oct 01, 2017 11:42AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9267 comments Mod
For those who would like to read with me over the three months (October – December 2017), I’ve included the schedule that I plan to use below. I’ve tried to divide the book up using the installations in the previous post so that I can get a feel for the original publication and reading experience.

However, I think many of you will finish this book quickly. Please feel free to continue the conversation over on the thread for The Woman in White - Spoilers -- Entire Book

October 1: First Epoch – Walter Hartright, I – VIII (1 – 8)
October 8: First Epoch – Walter Hartright, IX – XV (9 – 15)
October 15: First Epoch – Vincent Gilmore, I – IV (1 – 4)
October 22: First Epoch – Marian Halcombe, I & II (1 & 2)
October 29: Second Epoch – Marian Halcombe, I – IV ( 1 – 4)

November 5: Second Epoch – Marian Halcombe, V – VII (5 – 7)
November 12: Second Epoch – Marian Halcombe, VIII – X (8 – 10) & Frederick Fairlie
November 19: Second Epoch – Eliza Michelson, I & II ( 1 & 2) and Several Narratives, 1. Hestor Pinhorn – 5. Walter Hartright
November 26: Third Epoch – Walter Hartright, I – VII (1 – 7)

December 3: Third Epoch – Walter Hartright, VIII – XI (8 – 11) and The Story Continued by Mrs. Catherick
December 10: Third Epoch – The Story Continued by Walter Hartright, I – VII (1 – 7)
December 17: The Count’s Narrative & The Story Concluded by Walter Hartright, I – III (1 -3)
December 24: Entire book and Appendices A & B


message 7: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9267 comments Mod
My copy of the book has two Prefaces, (1860 & 1861) – I also have an introduction. If you have any of these in your edition have you read them? Or do you prefer to read introductions after you finish a book?


Rosemarie | 1548 comments I generally read the introduction after I finish the book for two reasons. The first is that it is more meaningful if I know who the characters are, and the second is to avoid spoilers.


Kathleen | 3662 comments Thank you for the schedule and info, Katy. I'm excited about this, as I've never read Collins before. Problem is I'm way overloaded with books I'm currently reading and challenges I should be trying to finish. BUT, that never stopped me before! :-)

I'll take a look today. My copy The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins ) has an intro, notes, chronology and preface. I usually read until it starts to sound spoilery and then stop and do what Rosemarie said.


Kimberly Wendt | 130 comments Katy,

Looks like you skipped the week of October 22? Could you edit the reading schedule to include that week? Thanks!


message 11: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9267 comments Mod
Kathleen wrote: "Thank you for the schedule and info, Katy. I'm excited about this, as I've never read Collins before. Problem is I'm way overloaded with books I'm currently reading and challenges I should be tryin..."

There is no need for you to follow my schedule if it doesn't fit yours. Join in and discuss with us whenever you can.


message 12: by Katy, New School Classics (last edited Oct 01, 2017 11:41AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9267 comments Mod
Kimberly wrote: "Katy,

Looks like you skipped the week of October 22? Could you edit the reading schedule to include that week? Thanks!"


So glad you found that. Don't know what happened, but I'll get it fixed! Thank you. I'm hoping that you can catch any other errors too.


message 13: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9267 comments Mod
Rosemarie wrote: "I generally read the introduction after I finish the book for two reasons. The first is that it is more meaningful if I know who the characters are, and the second is to avoid spoilers."

It does seem that many introductions do contain spoilers for the book. That doesn't usually bother me too much, except of course for mysteries. As this is a reread, I do plan to read the intro -- but will post those thoughts on the Entire Book Spoiler thread, so as to not give anything away to first time readers.


message 14: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9267 comments Mod
Walter Hartright is the first narrator of our story. Do you feel that he is a reliable narrator so far? What do you think of him?


message 15: by Kayla (new)

Kayla (kaylavano) I just finished chapter VIII. So far I find him pretty reliable, although it did take him a while to recognize the resemblance between Laura and the woman in white. So maybe that calls into question his recall on other aspects of the story?

I really love his descriptions of the other characters- they are downright t hilarious, especially Pesca and Mrs. Vesey. This is a favorite:

Starting from this point of view, it will always remain my private persuasion that Nature was absorbed in making cabbages when Mrs. Vesey was born, and that the good lady suffered the consequences of a vegetable preoccupation in the mind of the Mother of us all.

I will say, as well as he describes other people, I find Hartright himself kind of boring. Maybe I will get a better sense of him through other people's narration.


message 16: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9267 comments Mod
That was a wonderful description, I agree.


message 17: by Matt (new) - rated it 5 stars

Matt (mmullerm) | 751 comments I hope everyone enjoys The Woman in White! I read it a few years ago and thoroughly enjoyed it. I would have joined the group and done a re-read but I have so many books I still want to get to this year, so I have to put off a re-read for now.

The way the story is told through the different voices/perspectives made this book so interesting and engaging for me. This book also has an ethereal almost ghost like quality to it, so it is a good book to read in the fall. Good luck to the group and enjoy!

Matt


Kathleen | 3662 comments I actually like the schedule, Katy--thank you for putting it together. I'm going to try to use it, as a goal anyway!

I know this is a spoiler thread, but I appreciate Kayla starting her comment with where she is in the book--an easy way to know which comments I should wait to read when I get there. :-)

Matt, I think I'll like the different voices too, and really looking forward to the ghostliness!


message 19: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9267 comments Mod
Kathleen wrote: "I actually like the schedule, Katy--thank you for putting it together. I'm going to try to use it, as a goal anyway!

I know this is a spoiler thread, but I appreciate Kayla starting her comment with where she is in the book..."


Hope the schedule works for you Kathleen.

And yes, I think if we all indicate where we are in the book when we post it will be a great help.


Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin | 124 comments I'm actually about to finish chaper two and I must say that I'm really loving this book so far. I know I'm not too far in but I just love it. I hope I love the whole thing!


Kathleen | 3662 comments I finished Chapter 8, and pretty much agree with everything Kayla said. Sort of unbelievable that he didn't see the resemblance, especially when she was dressed in white and all.

My favorite funny line about Mrs. Vesey: “A mild, a compliant, an unutterably tranquil and harmless old lady, who never by any chance suggested the idea that she had been actually alive since the hour of her birth.”


Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin | 124 comments I'm really going through have to pay attention to all the comments here because I'm know something is going to go over my head!


message 23: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9267 comments Mod
Walter Hartright
In each chapter, one or two strange things happen. Say what these strange things are. Is there an explanation for these events? If so, what is the explanation or what might it be?


message 24: by Katy, New School Classics (last edited Oct 08, 2017 01:12PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9267 comments Mod
Walter Hartright
What is your opinion of the Woman in White so far? Do you think she is mad?


Carlo | 206 comments Walter Hartright
I don't think she's mad. There's obviously some significance that she looks very similar to Miss Fairlie. At first I thought that these people might have switched places but the only way this could be possible was if the step sister was in on it.
The note warning against the wedding is very mysterious.


message 26: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9267 comments Mod
I love that the mysteries start right off with this book.


message 27: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9267 comments Mod
As you finish up Walter Hartright's first narrative piece, what do you think of him now? Do you trust him as a narrator?


Carlo | 206 comments So far I trust him. At least there hasn't been anything in the story to suggest otherwise, unless I've missed something. He appears quite honest in his feelings for Laura and is distrustful of the baronet whom she is to marry, which is understandable under the circumstances.

I'm actually a bit suspicious of Miss. Halcombe. She seems to be shielding her sister from Walter and making decisions for her. I'm not sure if she is being protective or overbearing.


message 29: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9267 comments Mod
Thanks for the thoughts, Carlo.


message 30: by Kayla (new)

Kayla (kaylavano) Katy wrote: "Walter Hartright
What is your opinion of the Woman in White so far? Do you think she is mad?"


I just finished with Chapter 15. The Woman in White seems mad to me thus far. Obsessing over Mrs. Fairlie's grave, having a fit at the sound of Sir Percival Glyde's name (instead of just explaining her beef with him).


Piyangie | 408 comments Katy wrote: "As you finish up Walter Hartright's first narrative piece, what do you think of him now? Do you trust him as a narrator?"

I do trust Walter as a narrator. There is nothing to my understanding to suggest otherwise. He is honest in his feelings for Laura and dutiful towards Laura and Marian as a friend. He is suspicous of the Baronet not only because of his own feelings but also because of his genuine belief in the story of the woman in white.
The woman in white is indeed queer and honestly you could think she is insane. Although I have not read enough to know whether she is actually mad and whether her warnings were the conduct of her illusory mind, at this point I do believe she is not mad.


message 32: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9267 comments Mod
I like Walter also. Do you think he is the "hero figure" for the story?


message 33: by Jane (new) - rated it 5 stars

Jane | 15 comments Just finished because I could not put this down !
A brilliantly constructed plot and I agree that Walter is almost the hero -wink


message 34: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9267 comments Mod
Jane wrote: "Just finished because I could not put this down !
A brilliantly constructed plot and I agree that Walter is almost the hero -wink"


I knew that would happen to several people. Join us over in the entire book spoiler thread and discuss all that you like. It is a really good read IMO.


George P. | 532 comments I'm listening to an audiobook on cds of Woman in White, and I know I'm about 30% through, on a Marian Halcombe part, but don't know which part, maybe still her 1st.
I like Collins' writing style, very nice and lucid. I can't say I'm enjoying the story a lot at this point, though I liked it at first. I find the long dwelling on Laura Fairlie's love for Hartright (which neither of them ever expressed to one another because of her engagement) and her reluctance to marry the older Sir Percival to be getting rather tiresome at this point. Although she is apparently about 18 years old, she just KNOWS she will NEVER get over her feelings for him and be able to love anyone else. I can understand someone that age believing that but I know better, so I wonder if we're expected to accept that as truth.
I'm glad to hear that the plot is a good one overall and look forward to developments, and hope it's not too Jane Austen-y as it progresses (she was clever and funny at times but I just don't like her stories much).
Anne Cathrick, The W in W, seems a little crazy to me, but that's not unusual ;)


message 36: by Sabrina (new) - added it

Sabrina Michel George wrote: "I'm listening to an audiobook on cds of Woman in White, and I know I'm about 30% through, on a Marian Halcombe part, but don't know which part, maybe still her 1st.
I like Collins' writing style, ..."

George, as much as I love all the Victorians (including Wilkie Collins) you have to keep in mind that the reading public in the middle to late 19th century had LOTS of time on their hands, therefore novelists tended to be long winded at times. Moreover, sometimes the novels were published in literary magazines and in this case the authors were payed by the line. In other words, the more text they wrote, the more they got payed. They didn't much believe in keeping what was essential to the plot and discarding the rest (as authors or at least their editors would do today). Don't worry about the story starting to resemble a Jane Austen novel, though. The Victorians wrote in a completely different style, so there's no chance of that. I hope you enjoy "The Woman In White"; if you like W.Collins, you might read "The Moonstone" next, which is generally regarded (by specialists) as the very first detective novel. In any case,first ever detective novel or not, It's a wonderful read.


Piyangie | 408 comments One more days read and I will finish the book. This is my first Wilkie Collins and I'm so enjoying it. It will definitely be a favourite. I love the character of Walter Hartright - to me, he is certainly the hero!


message 38: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9267 comments Mod
This week we have Vincent Gilmore as our narrator of the story. How reliable do you feel his part of the story is related?


message 39: by Sabrina (new) - added it

Sabrina Michel Piyangie wrote: "One more days read and I will finish the book. This is my first Wilkie Collins and I'm so enjoying it. It will definitely be a favourite. I love the character of Walter Hartright - to me, he is cer..."
Katy, if you enjoyed "The Woman In White" and want to read something else by Wilkie Collins, try "The Moonstone". According to literary specialists , it was the first ever detective novel, forerunner to Sherlock Holmes, Agatha Christie and company.
In any case - first ever detective novel or not - it's a great read. A mystery which kept the 19th century reading public glued to their seats. I love the Victorians and that whole period, so it did the same for me. I would recommend it to anyone who likes well written literature, mysteries and especially fans of the Late Victorian novelists.


message 40: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9267 comments Mod
Yes, I've also read The Moonstone. It was a good read, but I was more impressed with The Woman in White.


message 41: by Sabrina (new) - added it

Sabrina Michel Yes, so was I. "The Moonstone" is something I was suggesting to a person who liked "The Woman In White" and was looking for another Wilkie Collins novel to read. Some of his fiction isn't likely to appeal to most people today, in my opinion, but I think "The Moonstone" is one which has stood the test of time, even though it is a different type of novel.


message 42: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9267 comments Mod
I hope I didn't sound too abrupt. Sorry about that. Thank you for thinking of me and recommending a book that I might like. Because I did enjoy both books. And for someone who has enjoyed Collins, definitely check out The Moonstone also.


message 43: by Sabrina (new) - added it

Sabrina Michel No, no problem, you didn't sound abrupt at all. I really didn't take that it that way. I just explained why I'd recommend "The Moonstone" rather than all of Collins's other novels, which have been forgotten and are only read today by specialists in the Late Victorian period.


message 44: by Sue (new) - rated it 5 stars

Sue K H (sky_bluez) | 3094 comments I decided to start this one last night. I'm still in The First Epoch - Walter Hartright so I'm going to avoid reading comments until I catch up. Then, I'm going to try my hardest to go slow with Katy's schedule. I am loving it so far so it may be hard to wait but I know there is value in it so it's worth trying!


message 45: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9267 comments Mod
Nice that you have joined us Sue. We don't have many comments past Walter Hartright at the moment. And if you get ahead of the schedule, now worries as we have another spoiler thread for those who have finished or are ahead of schedule. Hope you enjoy the book.


message 46: by Katy, New School Classics (last edited Oct 18, 2017 11:02AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9267 comments Mod
October 15: First Epoch – Vincent Gilmore, I – IV (1 – 4)

Do you think the pace and tone of the story has changed with our new narrator?


Piyumi Sabrina wrote: "George wrote: "I'm listening to an audiobook on cds of Woman in White, and I know I'm about 30% through, on a Marian Halcombe part, but don't know which part, maybe still her 1st.
I like Collins' ..."


Wow Sabrina, that detail about the different reading circles in Victorian societies and the payment for authors back then really really put a new spin on the novel. I found it long winded too but now it makes so much sense with what you said.

And I second Moonstone too :)...anyone interested in reading more Collins work should check that one out too


message 48: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9267 comments Mod
October 22: First Epoch – Marian Halcombe, I & II (1 & 2)

This week we have the first of Marian's narratives. Also her narrative ends the First Epoch of the book. As you read this week, you might make note of what characters have we met and what we know about each of them.

Also this is a mystery, so what facts do we have and what questions do you have so far in the story?


message 49: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9267 comments Mod
Any spoilers past The First Epoch please move over to the entire book spoiler thread. Don't spoil the mystery for those who are first-time readers.


message 50: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9267 comments Mod
Does your perception of Marian change now that you are reading her narrative as opposed to reading about her in Hartright's and Gilmore's narratives?


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