Mystery/Thriller Reading Friends discussion

Bannerless (The Bannerless Saga, #1)
This topic is about Bannerless
23 views
Group Read - Bannerless > Group Read - Bannerless chap 1-5 Spoilers welcome

Comments Showing 1-21 of 21 (21 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Ann (new) - rated it 5 stars

Ann (annrumsey) | 14410 comments The first five chapters go up to page 85.
If the first to post, please briefly summarize to guide the discussion. Spoilers welcome on this topic.


message 2: by Geri (last edited Oct 06, 2017 09:46PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Geri Enid, Sam, Olive and Berol live in Serenity Household’s Cottage in Serenity, on the outskirts of Haven. Olive has recently miscarried. Banners are necessary to conceive a child. Tomas shows up and tells Enid there may have been a murder. Enid will investigate.

Because of a storm, Enid, 12 at the time, and others huddle in a cellar in the town of Plenty. Men appear and alert them a tornado touched down and a farm down the road needs help. Tomas and Enid leave to help. They find destruction, injured and dead.

Enid and Tomas arrive at Pasadan. There is disagreement about whether it was murder or an accident. No witness to Sero’s death, who was in his workshop at the time. He was the only one with an auger and put up many of the town’s fences. Enid examines the body. Ariana discloses the reason she thinks it may not be an accident, Sero was a loner and Philos and others refuse to talk about it. 2 by 4 on wall identified as what Sero’s head hit. The physics don’t work out. Sero would have had to take 2 steps back. Bloody hand print and tracks found behind shed.

5 years after worst storm. Enid feeling left behind in relationships. Then, a story about how Enid met Dak at market. Dak is a musician and his music speaks to her. A relationship develops. Enid remembers getting her first implant. Dak leaves and comes back a month later. Tomas returns with people who have a Bannerless pregnancy that may be an implant failure. Tomas confronts Dak. Dak asks Enid to travel with him. Enid accepts.

Enid announces she has suspicions about Sero’s death. They talk to people who found Sero and who saw Sero last. Enid interviews Arbor. He reveals Sero was bannerless. Sero is cremated. Enid sees a man and woman observing, Miran and Kirk. No real answers after interviewing people of the town and searching Sero’s house. Except that Enid found Sero’s banner. Tomas finds out Miran went to Sero’s house twice in the days before he died. Enid is surprised when she realizes Dak is in Pasadan.


Geri So far I am liking the book. I like how we are getting backstory in between the murder mystery. Not sure of all the things that led to The Fall. But a lack of resources had something to do with it, since they are now overly conscious of this. And everyone needs to prove they can provide for a child before having one. The concept of banners is interesting.

The mystery is reading like a standard mystery investigation. Dak and his relationship to Enid will somehow have something to do with this, I think. I am interested to know why Dak and Enid split up and Enid is now with Sam.

The names and speech almost have an Amish feel to them. With the audiobook, it really comes through. I suppose this is to give the book a going back in time feeling.


message 4: by Ann (new) - rated it 5 stars

Ann (annrumsey) | 14410 comments Great summary Geri, Thanks very much for providing that for us!
I am also enjoying the book and I did go for the audio too which is well done and my usual preferred method.
I agree there is an Amish feel to the people and the household systems that are an intriguing mix of rural self sufficiency colored by technical knowledge and some remaining knowledge or items from a time that is mysteriously vague "before the fall".
I like Enid. I didn't mind (as I sometimes do) the alternative time chapters and like how tidbits are revealed in subtle but effective ways to start to fill in the blanks. Her eagerness to explore and be different, to not seek a banner makes her a compelling character.


message 5: by Ann (new) - rated it 5 stars

Ann (annrumsey) | 14410 comments Geri Yes the concept of banners is interesting.
In the scenes between the younger Enid and her Mother it seemed perfectly acceptable to be Bannerless by choice. Now with the death of the assumed bannerless Sero, shunned by his neighbors; the idea of being bannerless seems more ominous and perhaps dangerous due to isolation. I am eager to read more tomorrow. ;)


Geri Ann, I am glad you are enjoying it. I know you weren’t sure about the book. It’s always interesting to me how we as humans figure out a way to shun and/or discriminate against others. Sero not having a banner. That felt realistic to me.


message 7: by Ann (new) - rated it 5 stars

Ann (annrumsey) | 14410 comments Geri: yes, there was an eerily realistic feeling to how Sero was treated and it seemed mainly for being different. The pack or group instincts of humans are indeed interesting to observe!


Angela Bennett | 15 comments Just finished Ch. 5 . . . I have to say, I'm enjoying this book more than I anticipated. The world building, the description of the land and towns make each setting feel almost a character in and of itself. I can sit back an actually see it vividly, getting a sense of what it was like to live after "The Fall."

I immediately cared for Enid. I enjoy the change between present and past, getting to know Enid back when she was 12. Such a strong, intelligent girl (mature for her age).

Acquiring a banner in the household . . . what it meant to have one and how its seen upon those that don't achieve such privilege . . . good in one respect and sad in another . . . sad that ones status is deemed unworthy, a loner by not having a banner. As in Sero's case. But he had a banner but kept it a secret. The big WHY for me and I'm excited to find out. Though he was seen as an outcast, kept to himself, the little I know about him, I like him. I feel for him and his death. The reasons why he chose to be quiet about having a banner makes me think his reasons were good, served a purpose. I'll have to wait and see . . .


message 9: by Ann (new) - rated it 5 stars

Ann (annrumsey) | 14410 comments Angela: I agree, the setting is vivid in my mind's eye and the need to know more about this world was an immediate response.
I think I must like dystopian novels more than I think I do. Lol.

Angela wrote: "Just finished Ch. 5 . . . I have to say, I'm enjoying this book more than I anticipated. The world building, the description of the land and towns make each setting feel almost a character in and of itself..."


Angela Bennett | 15 comments Ann, I think I have to agree with you. Lol ;-)


message 11: by Geri (new) - rated it 4 stars

Geri Angela and Ann, I like post apocalyptic. That may seem strange. But I really do think they highlight a lot of what is good about humanity and our resilience to survive. Of course, it also highlights some of our worst qualities as well! When it’s done well, I enjoy it.


Angela Bennett | 15 comments Geri, not strange at all. I'm pleased that my first taste of post apocalyptic is an enjoyable piece thus far, and may have me inclined to experience more in the future.


Sandi (sandin954) | 1199 comments Thanks for the summaries Geri. I too am listening to the audio and enjoying it so far.

I agree that Dak and Enid's past will have some bearing on the plot and thought the details of the communities were well done.

I used to enjoy reading a post apocalyptic story now and then but got out of the habit.


message 14: by Geri (new) - rated it 4 stars

Geri So glad you are enjoying it, Sandi! That seems to be the consensus.


Sandi wrote: "Thanks for the summaries Geri. I too am listening to the audio and enjoying it so far.

I agree that Dak and Enid's past will have some bearing on the plot and thought the details of the communiti..."



Ceelee | 205 comments Thanks for the great summary Geri! I just stated Bannerless Wednesday and I liked it from the first page! I love that it reads like a traditional murder mystery in the futuristic world. I like Enid a lot! Her relationship to Dak is really interesting! Maybe because my hunny is a musician! I want to see what their relationship is like and where it is going in the story. I agree that he has some bigger part to play in the story too. I am intrigued by the Banners too and how The Fall came about. As someone said there was something mentioned about a shortage of resources but how? And why? I think I remember that Banners were awarded to households who had to prove they could take care of the baby and the woman could go to another household if the one where she lives has too many mouths to feed so it sounds kind of like a plan of population control. I haven't really clicked with Olive yet because I haven't seen too much of her character so I am wondering what part she will play later on. I am glad I am not the only one who finds a rather Amish feel to the story with people being so closed and silent during the investigation and that they practice shunning to those who have a Bannerless child. This story is really fascinating! I think Ms Vaughn does a good job weaving the past with the present which I don't always like in a novel because a lot of authors don't do that very well.


message 16: by Ann (new) - rated it 5 stars

Ann (annrumsey) | 14410 comments Ceelee: You've touched on one of the things I liked about Bannerless too; the changes of time and pov were very well done. I look forward to reading more of your comments on the other segments. This is a world that I don't seem to be able to set aside and keep thinking about it.

Ceelee wrote: "Thanks for the great summary Geri! I just stated Bannerless Wednesday and I liked it from the first page! I love that it reads like a traditional murder mystery in the futuristic world. ......
This story is really fascinating! I think Ms Vaughn does a good job weaving the past with the present which I don't always like in a novel because a lot of authors don't do that very well.
."



OMalleycat | 1448 comments Geri wrote: "The mystery is reading like a standard mystery investigation. Dak and his relationship to Enid will somehow have something to do with this, I think."

Geri, I like that this reads about equally as a murder mystery and post-apocalyptic novel. I like my reading to be pretty solidly set in the real world, so I was suspicious of apocalyptian aspect. So far I think Vaughn is doing well at handling it.

I'm with you in thinking there's something going on with Dak. It's just a little too convenient to find the secretive boyfriend in a secretive town that's had a murder of a secretive loner. All those secrets gotta be related!


message 18: by Ann (new) - rated it 5 stars

Ann (annrumsey) | 14410 comments Jan O’Cat: No, Dak doesn’t come across as the right person for Enid. The secrets pile up quickly.
I was also a bit leery initially of the post- apocalyptic theme of this book; I found the investigation fascinating and the “new” world interesting and thought provoking. (And yes, the idea of it coming true rather alarming)
Enjoy!


message 19: by OMalleycat (last edited Jul 21, 2018 11:05PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

OMalleycat | 1448 comments Ann wrote: ". . . Like how tidbits are revealed in subtle but effective ways to start to fill in the blanks."

I like how the author is doling out information about The Fall and its causes. So often authors in this genre want to slam readers in the face with what the society has lost, but by setting the book well after The Fall, Vaughn gives us characters who have always lived in this world and for whom Before the Fall is only scarce artifacts and elders' stories. It has the effect of presenting a true mystery in an exotic setting, like Scandinavian books or historical mysteries. The setting is part of the interest and intrigue; it's not the whole story.

I particularly expected to be apocalyptically slammed in the face when Enid was examining Sero's body. I was pleasantly surprised when it didn't become a treatise on everything she COULDN'T do. I think I started at that point to trust that the book wasn't going to go to Mad Max territory.


OMalleycat | 1448 comments Angela wrote: "I have to say, I'm enjoying this book more than I anticipated. The world building, the description of the land and towns make each setting feel almost a character in and of itself. I can sit back an actually see it vividly, getting a sense of what it was like to live after "The Fall"

Angela, I agree. The differences among the communities are interesting and each is well described. I also think the individual characters are well defined, even those like Olive and Fisher who have played minor roles so far.


message 21: by Ann (new) - rated it 5 stars

Ann (annrumsey) | 14410 comments Jan: Yes, I was pleasantly surprised and pleased too. This makes the experience more immersive which I enjoy in most books. The author allows the reader to feel that the reality of 'after the fall' is simply the way things are. (Which also gives us pause)

OMalleycat wrote: "I particularly expected to be apocalyptically slammed in the face when Enid was examining Sero's body. I was pleasantly surprised when it didn't become a treatise on everything she COULDN'T do. I think I started at that point to trust that the book wasn't going to go to Mad Max territory.
"



back to top