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Group Read Discussions > October 2017 Group Read Winner - Iron Lake by William Kent Krueger

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message 1: by Bill (new)

Bill | 5458 comments This is the thread for the group read discussion for Iron Lake by William Kent Krueger. Sally will be the moderator. Enjoy your reading and discussions.


message 2: by Thomas (new)

Thomas (tom471) | 1499 comments I read this book two months ago. Here is my review, 3.5/5
https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 3: by Skye (new)

Skye | 2105 comments It's a great review, Thomas, and I loved the book.


message 4: by Thomas (new)

Thomas (tom471) | 1499 comments Thanks Skye


message 5: by Sally (new)

Sally (saldragski) | 31 comments Hi all! I'll be the moderator for this group and wanted to give you a few notes of interest. The author was born in 1950 and lives in the Twin Cities with his family. Iron Lake won the Anthony Award for best first novel in 1999; and was a nominee for the Dilys Award for best book, also in 1999. This is the first in a series which currently totals 16 novels. I'm about two-thirds of the way through the book and have to say that, IMHO, it does read, at times, like a first book, but is suspenseful and attention grabbing.

Items of interest above were from fantasticfiction.com.

Sally


message 6: by Jennifer (new)

Jennifer Carpenter | 19 comments Started last week. Halfway through so good so far!


message 7: by William (new)

William I will be starting this shortly. I am reading Ann Leckie now, and I have a James Thane next. So I should be caught up with the rest of you by next week.

😃


message 8: by Suzy (new)

Suzy (goodreadscomsuzy_hillard) | 659 comments Sally wrote: "Hi all! I'll be the moderator for this group and wanted to give you a few notes of interest. The author was born in 1950 and lives in the Twin Cities with his family. Iron Lake won the Anthony Awar..."

Thanks, Sally for including information about the author. It got me curious for more, so I went to his website where there's some additional info. I live on the Minneapolis side of the Twin Cities and he lives on the St. Paul side. I think his story is really interesting. http://www.williamkentkrueger.com/about/


message 9: by Suzy (last edited Oct 03, 2017 12:15PM) (new)

Suzy (goodreadscomsuzy_hillard) | 659 comments I finished this over the weekend and will wait until others chime in to share detailed thoughts. One thing I will mention now is that I saw many similarities between this and the Walt Longmire series by Craig Johnson. Located side-by-side with an Indian reservation, both tension and good relationships between whites and native Americans, a casino, great descriptions of the landscape, Native American lore as in this case, the Windigo. What's unique to the Longmire series is more humor. But I'm not complaining - I liked Iron Lake a lot and I like Longmire books/tv show a lot. Did anyone else make that connection?


message 10: by Linda (new)

Linda (beaulieulinda117gmailcom) | 1380 comments I'm reading Sleeping Beauties but I think Iron Lake will be my next read.


message 11: by William (new)

William Suzy wrote: " I think his story is really interesting. http://www.williamkentkrueger.com/about/ "

Thank you!


message 12: by Sally (last edited Oct 03, 2017 03:10PM) (new)

Sally (saldragski) | 31 comments Suzy wrote: "I finished this over the weekend and will wait until others chime in to share detailed thoughts. One thing I will mention now is that I saw many similarities between this and the Walt Longmire seri..."

That got me curious as to who was published first -the Walt Longmire or Cork O'Connor series? The O'Connor series was published first - 1998 vs 2004.


message 13: by Sally (new)

Sally (saldragski) | 31 comments Suzy wrote: "Sally wrote: "Hi all! I'll be the moderator for this group and wanted to give you a few notes of interest. The author was born in 1950 and lives in the Twin Cities with his family. Iron Lake won th..."

Yes that website and video is very interesting. He not only talked about Iron Lake in the video but also Ordinary Grace which I have also read and liked very much. Thank you!


message 14: by Lynette (new)

Lynette | 1 comments Sally wrote: "Hi all! I'll be the moderator for this group and wanted to give you a few notes of interest. The author was born in 1950 and lives in the Twin Cities with his family. Iron Lake won the Anthony Awar..."
I liked Krueger's Ordinary Grace so much that I wanted to read another title by him. I agree with Sally that Iron Lake does read like a first book. Will comment more later when the discussion begins.


message 15: by Ann (last edited Oct 04, 2017 12:33AM) (new)

Ann Girdharry (anngirdharry) | 127 comments Lynette and Sally said, '...Ordinary Grace...'

Yes! Ordinary Grace is one of my favourite reads this year.

That's why I hope to join in with Iron Lake once I've finished my current book...


message 16: by William (last edited Oct 04, 2017 05:49AM) (new)

William Could I ask if there are graphic scenes of violence towards women or any scenes of violence or abuse towards children in this book?


message 17: by Sally (new)

Sally (saldragski) | 31 comments William wrote: "Could I ask if there are graphic scenes of violence towards women or any scenes of violence or abuse towards children in this book?"

No violence to children although one boy is apparently abducted, and due to what he has seen, has to grow up emotionally very fast.


message 18: by William (new)

William Sally wrote: "No violence to children...

Thank you.

Graphic violence towards women, then?


message 19: by Sally (new)

Sally (saldragski) | 31 comments William wrote: "Sally wrote: "No violence to children...

Thank you.

Graphic violence towards women, then?"


No none that I recall.


message 20: by William (new)

William Thank you, Sally.


message 21: by Suzy (last edited Oct 04, 2017 07:10AM) (new)

Suzy (goodreadscomsuzy_hillard) | 659 comments William wrote: "Sally wrote: "No violence to children...

Thank you.

Graphic violence towards women, then?"


There is violence against women in this book, but I wouldn't call it graphic. It's not random and is in the context of the crimes described in the book.


message 22: by William (last edited Oct 04, 2017 07:14AM) (new)

William Thank you. For me, it's about the clever, hard-won solution to a clever mystery, not the amount of blood-spatter etc.

(In all the years of my favourite detective, Inspector Morse on tv, there is almost no blood at all.)


message 23: by Suzy (new)

Suzy (goodreadscomsuzy_hillard) | 659 comments William wrote: "Thank you. For me, it's about the clever, hard-won solution to a clever mystery, not the amount of blood-spatter etc.

(In all the years of my favourite detective, Inspector Morse on tv, there is a..."


Not to get off on a tangent about Morse, but I've gone back to the beginning of the tv show. No blood-letting, but however, my guy and I noticed that he is very sexist! In the first two episodes he got involved sexually with either suspects or witnesses. It felt very dated . . . was not expecting that since I've watched all of them over the years, but 1987 was a long time ago. :)

On another note, Iron Lake was really good IMO in the crime set-up and solve, though it is much darker than Morse.


message 24: by William (last edited Oct 04, 2017 07:25AM) (new)

William Yes, Morse is always portrayed as a tragic figure, clumsy with all relationships, especially with women. The new-ish tv series, "Endeavour", about Morse as a young man somewhat ham-fistedly portrays some of this. When I arrived in the UK in 1985 (still there), I was dismayed by the amount of misogyny still prevalent in the society. This has improved substantially, and the UK is socially far superior to the USA in many ways .... at least until recently. 😢

I blame 40 years of pumping mind-damaging lead into the atomosphere around the world for the sorry state we are in today.

40 years of pumping lead into the atmosphere (gasoline), especially damaging the brains of the young, and taking brain evolution back 100,000 years. Stupid and can't help it... Most of the world's troubles...
http://www.motherjones.com/environmen...



message 25: by Jessica (new)

Jessica H | 32 comments I hope to get the book asap and join in the discussion. It was on my tbr list so it had my vote :)


message 26: by Sally (new)

Sally (saldragski) | 31 comments Does anyone else feel that Jo's character is strictly plot driven?


message 27: by William (new)

William Wow. Wonderful prose so early in the book....

They fasted the rest of the day and breathed in the smoke of a cedar fire. At first light next morning, they blackened their faces with the cedar ash, a sign to the spirits of the deep woods that they had purified themselves. Sam tied back his long black-and-gray hair with a leather cord ornamented with a single eagle feather. They smoked tobacco and red willow leaves mixed with powdered aster root as a hunting charm, then covered themselves with tallow made of various animal fats to disguise their scent from the bear.


message 28: by William (last edited Oct 07, 2017 04:43AM) (new)

William Cork dreams of Coleridge's poem, but can't remember the name. For me, any excuse to present the poem fills me with joy:

full poem here, Kubla Khan

In Xanadu did Kubla Khan
A stately pleasure-dome decree:
Where Alph, the sacred river, ran
Through caverns measureless to man
Down to a sunless sea.

So twice five miles of fertile ground
With walls and towers were girdled round:
And there were gardens bright with sinuous rills,
Where blossomed many an incense-bearing tree;
And here were forests ancient as the hills,
Enfolding sunny spots of greenery.

.... and continues. Truly a masterpiece.


message 29: by William (last edited Oct 07, 2017 03:17PM) (new)

William Sally wrote: "Does anyone else feel that Jo's character is strictly plot driven?"

I'm keeping an eye out for this.

Keep in mind that this is the first in this series, and all great Heroes must be driven, must carry pain and some experience of injustice, usually deeply buried. Around that core comes The Mission.

I think Jo is here to increase the isolation of the Hero, so yes, I agree with you.


message 30: by William (new)

William 27% ... as long as the Supernatural stays in people's heads here, I'm okay. As soon as there's paranormal "as fact", I say f'ck you Krueger and I'm outahere


message 31: by William (new)

William 36% ...
... I'm feeling uneasy reading this and I stopped to think why... It's the implied danger for Cork's family here. I just like the mystery and tracking down the villain, not he bits where the Hero's family members are at risk.


message 32: by William (last edited Oct 08, 2017 03:43AM) (new)

William Finished tonight. Could not put it down. 5am here.

Wonderful prose and living characters. The ending is drawn out far too long with complex, confusing scenes, but the resolution was very good with one deep loss.

"He looked at his hands. Big hands. How useless a man’s hands were, he thought, when it came to fixing the important things."


message 33: by William (new)

William I'm moving on to the second book in the series, but I would love to discuss Iron Lake here or in private with anyone who wishes.


message 34: by Chris (new)

Chris | 241 comments Sally wrote: Does anyone else feel that Jo's character is strictly plot driven?

I agree that Jo's character is not fleshed out in this novel and she is used as a plot device. It will be interesting to see if Krueger provides more layers to her as the series progresses. I am just making an assumption that she will be part of the series, of course.

I loved the writing and the peek into a Native American culture. Although I haven't read any of the Longmire books, I saw a few seasons on TV which I enjoyed and definitely can see some similarities here, especially the tensions between the whites & Native Americans, as mentioned in some previous posts.


message 35: by Britney (new)

Britney (tarheels) | 125 comments I read this last year and really enjoyed it. I have a friend who is Native American so the book intrigued me. I thought it was a good start to a series.


message 36: by Thomas (last edited Oct 08, 2017 10:18AM) (new)

Thomas (tom471) | 1499 comments Both my wife and I like the Longmire tv series and the books. Here is my review of The Cold Dish book 1 https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 37: by William (new)

William Thomas wrote: "Both my wife and I like the Longmire tv series and the books. Here is my review of The Cold Dish book 1 https://www.goodreads.com/review/show......"

Thank you for the review! Iron Lake is about as far from L.A. noir as you can get, except for Longmire!


message 38: by Thomas (new)

Thomas (tom471) | 1499 comments You're Welcome


message 39: by Jessica (new)

Jessica | 5 comments I found these books originally through my grandma, but they had been the later books, so I eventually bit the bullet and got this one through the library, and I have to say I really enjoy it.
I have seen the Windigo before, as I really enjoy Supernatural (the TV show with Sam and Dean Winchester)/

I'm not really sure how I feel about the main character, though I do think that there's a lot of development that could potentially happen. I look forward to seeing how his relationship with his children and girlfriend/wife go.

Specifically towards the plot in this book, I'm about halfway through, and I have to say that I'm not sure what I think. I don't really like the fact that the entire book started on the fact that a kid had gone missing, and then he just never shows back up. I'm not sure if that's wrapped up later, or if there was just some brief little thing that wrapped it up.

I look forward to finishing this and seeing what happens!


message 40: by Sally (new)

Sally (saldragski) | 31 comments William wrote: "I'm moving on to the second book in the series, but I would love to discuss Iron Lake here or in private with anyone who wishes."

Discuss away, that's what this thread is for. Please warn of any spoiler alerts if there is one.


message 41: by Sally (new)

Sally (saldragski) | 31 comments Jessica wrote: "I found these books originally through my grandma, but they had been the later books, so I eventually bit the bullet and got this one through the library, and I have to say I really enjoy it.
I hav..."


I felt the same way about the missing kid. Read on though for further developments.


message 42: by Linda (new)

Linda (beaulieulinda117gmailcom) | 1380 comments I just started this and excited. I've always wanted to read this series.


message 43: by Skye (new)

Skye | 2105 comments I am coming in late! I didn't know the discussion had begun; however, this is one of the best books I've read this for so many reasons.


message 44: by William (new)

William Skye wrote: "I am coming in late! I didn't know the discussion had begun; however, this is one of the best books I've read this for so many reasons."

Welcome aboard!


message 45: by Skye (new)

Skye | 2105 comments Thanks so much, William.


message 46: by Skye (new)

Skye | 2105 comments William wrote: "Finished tonight. Could not put it down. 5am here.

Wonderful prose and living characters. The ending is drawn out far too long with complex, confusing scenes, but the resolution was very good wit..."


Wonderful. How is the second book>I want to continue this series.


message 47: by Linda (new)

Linda (beaulieulinda117gmailcom) | 1380 comments Im on page 70 so far it's really good


message 48: by Skye (new)

Skye | 2105 comments Yes, it is a wonderful story.


message 49: by William (new)

William Skye wrote: "William wrote: "Finished tonight. Could not put it down. 5am here.

Wonderful prose and living characters. The ending is drawn out far too long with complex, confusing scenes, but the resolution w..."


The second book starts out a bit pedestrian, but picks up very nicely at about 15%

😊


message 50: by Skye (new)

Skye | 2105 comments I may order it, William. I am trying to read the first book of many series.


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