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What Matters October Topics > Did your frame about your role in transitions shift (p.75)? How?

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message 1: by Cristy (new)

Cristy James | 26 comments Mod
Did your frame about your role in transitions shift (p.75)? How?


message 2: by Dana (new)

Dana | 2 comments Hello everyone! I noticed in the transitions chapter and throughout the book the strong focus on needing to have feelings heard, processed, validated..this shifted my understanding of my role in transition planning, but also in working with families in general. That I need to not only discuss results and recommendations, but to also allow space for parents and family members to process and share their emotions.


message 3: by Cyndi (last edited Oct 16, 2017 09:45AM) (new)

Cyndi Johnson | 15 comments I admit that I am finding this piece hitting way too close to home, despite the fact that my daughter is only 10 and has a number of years to go before transition to adulthood. I will say that I am finding the book as a whole very difficult to read for this same reason--all of it resonating a little too much to the point that I am literally in tears and have to take an emotional break after each new topic. Still, the transition piece is very difficult me, because while I want my daughter to be as independent as possible, it is highly doubtful that she will ever live on her own. I have found fall Facebook posts from friends and family bemoaning "empty nest syndrome" to be heart-wrenching. I know way too much about a lot of syndromes and conditions, but that is one syndrome I am unlikely to ever experience. Bittersweet... Silver lining is that I may always be able to say "Good morning" to my sweet girl in person. Be still my heart...


message 4: by Diane (last edited Oct 19, 2017 05:18PM) (new)

Diane | 3 comments With a 19 year-old daughter with spina bifida who has recently transitioned to living on campus at a university an hour from home, I was distressed to read how difficult the transition was to receive inclusive housing and services for Micah, even while we were fighting the same battles ourselves. The effort can be exhausting and emotional. I applaud Micah and his family for sustaining their advocacy efforts, even in face of temporary set backs.


message 5: by Ashley (new)

Ashley Renner | 16 comments I am new to the field of neurodevelopmental disabilities and did not have much knowledge about transition prior to reading this chapter. I think one of the most import pieces to this chapter, and to my future career as a social worker, is to recognize the feelings and emotions of the family. Transition can be a trying time and working with the family to accomplish goals is important, but it's also important to validate their feelings and give them some time to process things.


message 6: by Kristina (new)

Kristina | 7 comments Dana wrote: "Hello everyone! I noticed in the transitions chapter and throughout the book the strong focus on needing to have feelings heard, processed, validated..this shifted my understanding of my role in tr..."

Hi Dana,

I was about to post something similar to your comment but decided to reply to your comment instead! I agree with the approach you saw this in. Being a former special education teacher, I think that school personnel (and I speak based on my experience) don't focus on actually 'hearing' students' or parents' feelings. I think this is an area that needs more attention. I think parents are the expert on their child and hearing their voice is crucial in this transition process.


message 7: by Lauren (new)

Lauren | 2 comments Cyndi wrote: "I admit that I am finding this piece hitting way too close to home, despite the fact that my daughter is only 10 and has a number of years to go before transition to adulthood. I will say that I am..."

I feel the same way - with this book in general hitting too close to home! I can't apply this specifically to transition, but when I read this post I felt the same way with being in tears and needing emotional breaks!


message 8: by Stephanie (new)

Stephanie Tellus | 10 comments I think this section of the book made a good point that transition is a time of difficult emotions that often is overlooked, as professionals may be distracted by other goals. While as a physical therapist I do not have as large of a role as other professionals in planning the details of transition, this chapter made me aware that this is a time that I need to be empathetic and offer a listening ear to parents and young people preparing for or going through transition. By being aware of this, I can give the individuals I work with the time and space to share their feelings and recognize and validate those feelings, in order to help them feel more supported during this time.


message 9: by Deanna (new)

Deanna Proimos | 12 comments This section of the book reinforced being a compassionate professional because the families are facing a lot of different and challenging emotions throughout their kiddo's life. I realized how much we need to listen and process what the parents are saying as well as paying attention to their nonverbal cues. As professionals, we need to be aware of this and validate their feelings and offer them support. It is a scary and difficult time for our families as they process all that the transitions process entails. This section reminded me to always reinforce to my patients that I am here for them at any time. I want to make sure that they understand they can ask me questions at any time because I am aware that I have given them a lot of information and they are trying to digest it all. Therefore, they may not have any questions at the moment but I'm sure they will think of something to ask later.


message 10: by Jessica (new)

Jessica B | 10 comments Deanna wrote: "This section of the book reinforced being a compassionate professional because the families are facing a lot of different and challenging emotions throughout their kiddo's life. I realized how much..."

What great insight. Any family with kids faces a lot of emotions and challenges as the kid transitions from childhood to adulthood, but most families can relate with their friends that have kids going through the same things. Many families with children with disabilities are facing those same emotions, and often a few more, and they often feel isolated because others can't relate. They can listen, but it's still not the same.


message 11: by Cristy (new)

Cristy James | 26 comments Mod
Cyndi wrote: "I admit that I am finding this piece hitting way too close to home, despite the fact that my daughter is only 10 and has a number of years to go before transition to adulthood. I will say that I am..."

I agree that it's hard to read. As a parent, it's really hard to hear stories of individuals with disabilities and not compare your child with them. And often that means that the strengths of the person in the story make you see your own child's deficits in a painful way. It's also often easy to see your child potentially falling into some of the same problem areas and then have another level of worry!


message 12: by Brandon (new)

Brandon Tross | 4 comments While during meetings I often can sense a parent's anxiety around their child transitioning out of their high school program, this chapter made me realize that I need to do a better job working with families to work up to transitioning. It is difficult enough transitioning to different building and programs through out the K-12 grade process. As a school psychologist, this chapter made to realize the importance of not only setting realistic and achievable goals for students, but also attending to the concerns of parents and making sure that with every IEP, we are building on the skills needed for th transitions goals parents, student, and family have worked together to decide on.


message 13: by Becky (new)

Becky Barron | 7 comments Stephanie wrote: "I think this section of the book made a good point that transition is a time of difficult emotions that often is overlooked, as professionals may be distracted by other goals. While as a physical t..."

I agree that these are often difficult times that are overlooked. I often notice that this entire period of young adults transitioning into more independence are lacking both resources and support within the field of Autism and Disability supports. This section was definitely important to help me become more aware of some of these challenges that I was not fully aware of before.


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