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The Lounge: Chat. Relax. Unwind. > Friends with a convict?

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message 1: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 7779 comments If a friend were convicted and sentenced would you remain friends, if s/he didn't do anything wrong to you personally or that would be it? Would you go visit him/her in jail?


message 2: by Graeme (new)

Graeme Rodaughan | 3270 comments Entirely possible, especially if I could mine his prison experiences for an upcoming novel...


message 3: by Graeme (new)

Graeme Rodaughan | 3270 comments "So your cell mate, is he attractive? Now be honest..."


message 4: by Graeme (new)

Graeme Rodaughan | 3270 comments Mind you, one of my actual ancestors was both a convict and a famous smuggler in Tasmania in the 19th C....

So no laughing...


message 5: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 7779 comments Graeme wrote: "Mind you, one of my actual ancestors was both a convict and a famous smuggler in Tasmania in the 19th C....

So no laughing..."


But to be friends with him/her you need a seance -:)


message 6: by Graeme (new)

Graeme Rodaughan | 3270 comments I certainly hope I never get a visitation...


message 7: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 7779 comments Hope what you hope doesn't happen doesn't happen. On the other hand if they smuggle you out to Tasmania, it's not an extreme trip back home -:)


message 8: by Graeme (new)

Graeme Rodaughan | 3270 comments Tasmania is a lovely place to visit - especially in summer. Bit cold at the moment. Really lovely food, wine, etc, peaceful, laidback easy-going and relaxed.


message 9: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 7779 comments I'd love to go there, especially to see the devil


message 10: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 4094 comments A lot of Australians have ancestors like Graeme's. As for Nik wanting to see the devil, is he seeking some sort of Faustian deal to sell more books????


message 11: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 7779 comments Don't know whether these guys can help selling books: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tasma... , but I'd like 2 c 1 -:)


message 12: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 4094 comments Exactly how a guy with facial tumour disease could help sell books eludes me. In fairness, Nik, I was fully aware of that devil, but I could not resist brining Mephistopheles into play.


message 13: by Graeme (new)

Graeme Rodaughan | 3270 comments They are kinda cute and have an odd gait when they run.


message 14: by J.J. (new)

J.J. Mainor | 1209 comments I've always wondered if there's a bit of shame to having an ancestor among the former prisoners in Australia...if it's sort of seen like finding a slaveowner in your family tree here in the States...


message 15: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 7779 comments Ian wrote: "Exactly how a guy with facial tumour disease could help sell books eludes me. In fairness, Nik, I was fully aware of that devil, but I could not resist brining Mephistopheles into play."

Maybe some desperate authors would gladly do a deal with Lucifer Publishing LTD, if it guaranteed sales


message 16: by Ian (new)

Ian Miller | 4094 comments Or even Lucifer Publishing Unlimited :-)


message 17: by Graeme (new)

Graeme Rodaughan | 3270 comments J.J. wrote: "I've always wondered if there's a bit of shame to having an ancestor among the former prisoners in Australia...if it's sort of seen like finding a slaveowner in your family tree here in the States..."

Not that I'm aware of. Lot's of convicts were at worst petty criminals whose biggest crime was to be poor.

Convicts = White Slaves.


message 18: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 1695 comments Convicts aren't necessarily any worse than the rest of us. Every day, people drive home after too many drinks and get home safely, wake up the next day wondering how they made it home. Then there's the guy who had a few too many, had an accident, and killed someone. Same behavior; different consequences. One's home free; the other's a convict.


message 19: by Lizzie (last edited Jul 31, 2017 03:51PM) (new)

Lizzie | 130 comments I worked as a Paralegal for 30 years-and did not think about what I would do if someone I knew went to prison. Then my adult son at age 21 committed a crime for which he was sentenced to 8 years. I have since met many wives and mothers of inmates and have a whole different perception. 22 months to go.


message 20: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 7779 comments Lizzie wrote: "22 months to go..."

Hope they pass fast ...


message 21: by Holly (new)

Holly (Goldikova) | 185 comments I had a distant cousin who was incarcerated in Northern Ireland back in '91. I used to write to him, but have lost touch since he was released after the Good Friday accords......just hope he's doing okay.


message 22: by Scout (last edited Aug 01, 2017 11:52PM) (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 1695 comments Lizzie, my heart is with you. Sons will do what they choose to do, thinking they have a right to live their lives, not acknowledging that they're dragging their moms along with them through all the pain.


message 23: by Lizzie (new)

Lizzie | 130 comments Scout wrote: "Lizzie, my heart is with you. Sons will do what they choose to do, thinking they have a right to live their lives, not acknowledging that they're dragging their moms along with them through all the..."

When he got straight and stayed that way, he actually acknowledged what he had done and how good i was to him despite his stupidity and that it was not a failure on my part. Sadly, it took another inmate to provide him with that role model and to help him stop and stay straight. His dad, my ex, is an alcoholic who sees nothing wrong with booze but thinks drugs are awful.

My son has apologized, which is a start . I have talked with other parents whose children dont take responsibility and are still blaming everyone else. One of the problems is society treats addiction as a moral failure rather than a disease.


message 24: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 1695 comments Sounds like your son is on the right path. I do have to ask you how drug addiction is a disease. Is it because it's genetic? Honest question, because I always tell my son he has a choice to make, and it's up to him to make the right one.


message 25: by Lizzie (new)

Lizzie | 130 comments Scout wrote: "Sounds like your son is on the right path. I do have to ask you how drug addiction is a disease. Is it because it's genetic? Honest question, because I always tell my son he has a choice to make, a..."

Yes, genetics, but other reasons as well. I don't want to get on my soapbox in here. If you are interested, i can send you a message. As we know from the news, opiate addiction is transferring to heroin as a more attainable substitute an America is facing an epidemic.


message 26: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 1695 comments OK


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