Navigating Indieworld Discussing All Things Indie discussion

12 views

Comments (showing 1-7 of 7) (7 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Theodore (last edited Jul 04, 2017 10:43AM) (new)

Theodore Cohen (TheodoreJeromeCohen) | 1234 comments Take a look at this piece I received yesterday from Amazon Marketing Services. It sure does paint a rosy picture of one man's success using AMS to market his product. Frankly, just about everyone here would give their whatever to duplicate his results . . . but (why is it that there always a big butt to everything?) . . .

http://g-ecx.images-amazon.com/images...

"One man’s story of using Amazon Marketing Services
to go from manuscript to movie deal.

"After a decade in internet startups, A.G. Riddle spent two and a half years writing his first novel, The Atlantis Gene, which was edited by his mother and featured a cover he designed himself. Over two million copies later, all sold through Amazon, we think it’s safe to say his novel did indeed “take off,” making his story not only one of emerging author success, but one demonstrating the value of Amazon Marketing Services."

Hmmmm . . . that's quite a result! So, I went up on Amazon.com and looked up the author, RG Riddle:

https://www.amazon.com/A.G.-Riddle/e/...

Seems he was more than just a participant in those startups: "A.G. Riddle spent ten years starting internet companies before retiring to pursue his true passion: writing fiction."

I'm not knocking the guy's success! He's living the American Dream. But you have to wonder how this story relates to you and me (well, at least to me; you're probably rolling in dough), given I expect he's spent Big Coin with Amazon to propel his book--and his earnings--to those lofty heights.

Marketing ain't cheap. It's more difficult than writing, for sure. And there's a thousand more people out there waiting to take your money on the marketing side, believe me, than those offering to help you publish your book. Ask Carole how much effort she puts in every day on marketing...and the funds it takes.

Guard your wallet well.

Ted

PS With his kind of financial backing available, I'm surprised he hasn't submitted one of his books to Kindle Scout. They're always looking for people with the resources available that are needed to create platforms for the books they "select" for publication. And make no mistake, THEY want YOU to foot the bill for a heft piece of the marketing and will claw back any part of the royalties paid up front that aren't achieved after your book is published.


message 2: by Alex (new)

Alex Carver | 3885 comments I think the biggest thing to note in this is 1 person's success with AMS, compared to the thousands, if not millions, of people using it. Now if the success rate was 50% or better, I might be more willing to spend money with them.


message 3: by R. (new)

R. Claire | 18 comments Yes, it's definitely buyer beware territory.


message 4: by Theodore (new)

Theodore Cohen (TheodoreJeromeCohen) | 1234 comments Alex wrote: "I think the biggest thing to note in this is 1 person's success with AMS, compared to the thousands, if not millions, of people using it. Now if the success rate was 50% or better, I might be more ..."

Yes, would love to see ROI stats!


message 5: by Alex (new)

Alex Carver | 3885 comments I think ROI stats would show a lot of money flowing from authors' banks accounts to Amazon's, and very little flowing the other way.


message 6: by Theodore (new)

Theodore Cohen (TheodoreJeromeCohen) | 1234 comments Alex wrote: "I think ROI stats would show a lot of money flowing from authors' banks accounts to Amazon's, and very little flowing the other way."

Bingo! We have a winner!


message 7: by Ellis (new)

Ellis Knox (sknox) | 22 comments Also, note that book was the "first book in The Origin Mystery, a trilogy that has sold over two million copies in the US, has been translated into 23 languages, and is in development to be a major motion picture. " So it's all three together that come to two million. Still not shabby.

The fact that the book has been translated and optioned means the book itself is strong. Those teeming masses yearning to be noticed are made up of a great deal of very poor books. Rule One still applies: first write a good book.

I'm sure Mr Riddle put up a chunk of money, but I don't think I'm going to blame Amazon for his success or for my lack of same. He chose to write a thriller in a popular genre. I choose to write off-beat alternate historical fantasy, and not all the money in the world is going to sell two million copies.


back to top