Diversity in All Forms! discussion

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Monthly Book Suggestions > Country (September 2017)

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message 1: by Mariah (new)

Mariah (MariahRoze) | 725 comments Mod
Group Read Topic/Theme for September is Country. Please suggest books that fit this topic. You have till 7/11/17.


message 2: by Vicky (last edited Jul 04, 2017 01:51PM) (new)


message 3: by Mariah (new)

Mariah (MariahRoze) | 725 comments Mod
Saudi Arabia
Girls of Riyadh by Rajaa Alsanea Girls of Riyadh by Rajaa Alsanea
“When Rajaa Alsanea boldly chose to open up the hidden world of Saudi women—their private lives and their conflicts with the traditions of their culture—she caused a sensation across the Arab world. Now in English, Alsanea’s tale of the personal struggles of four young upper-class women offers Westerners an unprecedented glimpse into a society often veiled from view. Living in restrictive Riyadh but traveling all over the globe, these modern Saudi women literally and figuratively shed traditional garb as they search for love, fulfillment, and their place somewhere in between Western society and their Islamic home.”


Dominican Republic
The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Díaz The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Diaz
“Oscar is a sweet but disastrously overweight ghetto nerd who—from the New Jersey home he shares with his old world mother and rebellious sister—dreams of becoming the Dominican J.R.R. Tolkien and, most of all, finding love. But Oscar may never get what he wants. Blame the fukú—a curse that has haunted Oscar’s family for generations, following them on their epic journey from Santo Domingo to the USA. Encapsulating Dominican-American history, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao opens our eyes to an astonishing vision of the contemporary American experience and explores the endless human capacity to persevere—and risk it all—in the name of love.”


message 4: by Mariah (new)

Mariah (MariahRoze) | 725 comments Mod
Syria
A Hope More Powerful Than the Sea One Refugee's Incredible Story of Love, Loss, and Survival by Melissa Fleming A Hope More Powerful Than the Sea: One Refugee's Incredible Story of Love, Loss, and Survival by Melissa Fleming
Doaa and her family leave war-torn Syria for Egypt where the climate is becoming politically unstable and increasingly dangerous. She meets and falls in love with Bassem, a former Free Syrian Army fighter and together they decide to leave behind the hardship and harassment they face in Egypt to flee for Europe, joining the ranks of the thousands of refugees who make the dangerous journey across the Mediterranean on overcrowded and run-down ships to seek asylum overseas and begin a new life. After four days at sea, their boat is sunk by another boat filled with angry men shouting threats and insults. With no land in sight and surrounded by bloated, floating corpses, Doaa is adrift with a child’s inflatable water ring around her waist, while two little girls cling to her neck. Doaa must stay alive for them. She must not lose strength. She must not lose hope.


message 5: by Mariah (new)

Mariah (MariahRoze) | 725 comments Mod
Finland
The Year of the Hare by Arto Paasilinna
The Year of the Hare by Arto Paasilinna
“‘Which of us has not had that wonderfully seditious idea: to play hooky for a while from life as we know it?’ With these words from his foreword, Pico Iyer puts his finger on the exhilaratingly anarchic appeal of The Year of the Hare. Suddenly realizing what’s important in life (with the help of a bunny), a man quits his job and heads to the countryside in this internationally bestselling comic novel.”

Ireland
Ulysses by James Joyce
Ulysses by James Joyce
“Ulysses has been labeled dirty, blasphemous, and unreadable. In a famous 1933 court decision, Judge John M. Woolsey declared it an emetic book—although he found it sufficiently unobscene to allow its importation into the United States—and Virginia Woolf was moved to decry James Joyce’s “cloacal obsession.” None of these adjectives, however, do the slightest justice to the novel. To this day it remains the modernist masterpiece, in which the author takes both Celtic lyricism and vulgarity to splendid extremes. It is funny, sorrowful, and even (in a close-focus sort of way) suspenseful. And despite the exegetical industry that has sprung up in the last 75 years, Ulysses is also a compulsively readable book. Even the verbal vaudeville of the final chapters can be navigated with relative ease, as long as you’re willing to be buffeted, tickled, challenged, and (occasionally) vexed by Joyce’s sheer command of the English language.”


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