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message 1: by Katie, Heliocentric Mod (new)

Katie | 1885 comments Mod
Okay guys, us nonfiction readers are probably in the minority here in this group, so let's have a special space for us.

What type of nonfiction do you like to read? Do you have any good recommendations, or are you looking for recommendations for a certain nonfiction genre?


message 2: by Jillian (last edited Jul 03, 2017 04:14PM) (new)

Jillian | 416 comments Destiny of the Republic A Tale of Madness, Medicine and the Murder of a President by Candice MillardDestiny of the Republic: A Tale of Madness, Medicine and the Murder of a President/Candice Millard this is my favorite non-fiction book. After reading it, I started reading more non-fiction books.

I'm not big on biographies/memoir books but I enjoyed this one last year The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating by Elisabeth Tova BaileyThe Sound of a Wild Snail Eating/Elisabeth Tova Bailey.

Also, if you like audiobooks I have started listening to The Great Courses books. So far, I have liked both books I have listened to.


message 3: by Kathy (new)

Kathy | 981 comments My husband and I listen to nonfiction audiobooks on car trips. Two that we enjoyed this past year:

Dead Wake The Last Crossing of the Lusitania by Erik LarsonDead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania by Erik Larson tells about the sinking of the Lusitania, including eyewitness accounts.

The Road to Little Dribbling Adventures of an American in Britain by Bill BrysonThe Road to Little Dribbling: Adventures of an American in Britain by Bill Bryson This is a humorous book detailing Bryson's adventures travelling through England.


message 4: by Jillian (last edited Jul 03, 2017 05:10PM) (new)

Jillian | 416 comments Kathy, I have Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania on my TBR list . I only liked Erik Larson's Isaac's Storm: A Man, a Time, and the Deadliest Hurricane in History so so but I'm planning on giving the author another go.


message 5: by Marta (last edited Jul 03, 2017 05:31PM) (new)

Marta (Gezemice) | 699 comments I am mostly a fiction reader but I like to mix it up with non-fiction. I just looked at how many I read, it appears it is 10-15% of my reads, but it feels like more, because generally nonfiction takes much longer to read for me. However I am always reading at least one, albeit I might finish 10 fiction books while I read it :)

I like to read a few science books per year. Used to love history but fallen out of the habit. I was just getting back into it with Queen Isabella: Treachery, Adultery, and Murder in Medieval England by Alison Weir, who is my favorite history author. I loved this book, but you do have to tolerate some boring details like they bought 36 barrels of sturgeon for 23s and 11d (still have not figured out what the d was).

Other great recent nonfiction I read and heartily recommend:
The Autobiography of Malcolm X - fascinating man, incredible life, superb writing.
Born a Crime: Stories From a South African Childhood - if you can, get the audio, Trevor Noah's performance is hilarious and touching.
March: Book One and the March series - great graphic novel series about the civil rights movement

All time fave: The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks - this really is great even for fiction readers - it reads like a novel and it is astounding.


message 6: by Laura, Celestial Sphere Mod (new)

Laura | 2655 comments Mod
I don't read much non-fiction but I am hoping to pick up more now that I'm finally done with school and my brain feels a little less like mush :P

Some of my favorites:
Helter Skelter: The True Story of the Manson Murders by Vincent Bugliosi

The Magnolia Story by Chip and Joanna Gaines

Zoo Story: Life in the Garden of Captives by Thomas French

Columbineby Dave Cullen

But I'm always up for a good true crime recommendation!


message 7: by Kelly (new)

Kelly Audiogirl.booking.it (audiogirlbookingit) | 366 comments Marta wrote: "I am mostly a fiction reader but I like to mix it up with non-fiction. I just looked at how many I read, it appears it is 10-15% of my reads, but it feels like more, because generally nonfiction ta..."

I loved the The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

And I just purchased Born a Crime: Stories From a South African Childhood on audible looking forward to listening to that one!

I just listened to a fascinating and powerful book.... The Fact of a Body: A Murder and a Memoir really heavy stuff but so interesting!!!


message 8: by Kelly (last edited Jul 03, 2017 09:27PM) (new)

Kelly Audiogirl.booking.it (audiogirlbookingit) | 366 comments Laura wrote: "I don't read much non-fiction but I am hoping to pick up more now that I'm finally done with school and my brain feels a little less like mush :P


Have you read The Good Nurse: A True Story of Medicine, Madness, and Murder that was pretty interesting!



message 9: by Kelly (new)

Kelly Audiogirl.booking.it (audiogirlbookingit) | 366 comments I absolutely loved A Long Way Home So heart wrenching and heart warming!!

Enjoyed Lab Girl and Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Life, Death, and Hope in a Mumbai Undercity

I am also a sucker for most of the comedian/ Hollywood memoirs such as Bossypants and Naked

I am a big fan of NonFiction in general glad there others in this group that enjoy it!


message 10: by Katie, Heliocentric Mod (new)

Katie | 1885 comments Mod
I'd been meaning to read Erik Larson for ages, and I finally just read The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America for my book club this month. I found it really compelling. I'm tentatively planning on Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania for next year's on, in or under water prompt.


message 11: by Kelly (new)

Kelly Audiogirl.booking.it (audiogirlbookingit) | 366 comments Good call on dead wake!!! Did you enjoy devil in the white city?? That one I didn't care that much. I like the premise but something in the delivery got me bogged down.


message 12: by Joan (last edited Jul 03, 2017 07:21PM) (new)

Joan Barnett | 717 comments I didn't used to like non-fiction. Most of them I find hard to read but much easier to listen to on audio so since I started listening to them on audio I've read so much more non-fiction. My commute to work is 45 minutes each way so I've been getting a lot of non-fiction books done that way.
I started out with Bill O'Reilly's Killing Lincoln: The Shocking Assassination that Changed America Forever. I loved that book so much. I didn't realize what all that went on that day. I never remember hearing in history class that the secretary of state was stabbed that day also. I've listened to his other books but I didn't think they were as good.
I've also listened to the Erik Larson books In the Garden of Beasts: Love, Terror, and an American Family in Hitler's Berlin and Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania. I just finished Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption and I listened to The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics.
My all time favorite non-fiction that I've read in the last couple of years was Shoe Dog: A Memoir by the Creator of NIKE. That was pretty good on audio.
I seem to also listen to a lot of actor/comedian memoirs which really haven't been my favorite. I keep picking them up at the library though. I did enjoy Troublemaker: Surviving Hollywood and Scientology just because I felt like I learned a bit about Scientology.
I also like learning about political figures and I enjoyed Elizabeth the Queen: The Life of a Modern Monarch and Long Walk to Freedom. Those are some of the ones I thought were interesting and worth the read.


message 13: by Kelly (new)

Kelly Audiogirl.booking.it (audiogirlbookingit) | 366 comments Boys on the boat and unbroken were both great!!! Both so inspiring really good!! I never thought I like nonfiction until I tried some and found it fascinating. I am an audio girl so almost ever think I do is audio.


message 14: by Marta (new)

Marta (Gezemice) | 699 comments Kelly wrote: "Marta wrote: "I am mostly a fiction reader but I like to mix it up with non-fiction. I just looked at how many I read, it appears it is 10-15% of my reads, but it feels like more, because generally..."
I hope you enjoy Born a Crime! He had such a fascinating chikdhood. His mom is a real character!

Lab Girl is on my list, too! And Bossypants was great fun. Have you tried Furiously Happy: A Funny Book About Horrible Things? It is hilarious and very personal.

I should check out The Fact of a Body! Looks fascinating!


message 15: by Marta (new)

Marta (Gezemice) | 699 comments Katie wrote: "I'd been meaning to read Erik Larson for ages, and I finally just read The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America for my boo..."
My bookclub read Devil in the White City and we had an interesting discussion. I thought there were two stories that had nothing to do with each other. The murder story was incredibly chilling and I still can hardly believe it is true. Hard to believe such a monster exists.


Jen from Quebec :0) (MuppetBaby99) | 76 comments Jillian wrote: "Destiny of the Republic A Tale of Madness, Medicine and the Murder of a President by Candice Millard[book:Destiny of the Republic: A Tale of Madness, Medicine and the Murder of a President|10335..."

JILLIAN:
Which President was the book about? (the one that started you on non-fiction)
I love LEARNING, thus, non-fiction books help me do that. (I also, of course, learn from fiction works as well, mainly studying for writing techniques. Sometimes a fiction book can cause 'a big think' for the readers, at various times in the reading) BUT for more 'hardcore learning' I tend towards non-fiction. As Jillian mentioned, THE GREAT COURSES series on Audible is fantastic. It is literally like being back at university, as I write notes to the sounds of (usually) a PhD college professor. The best is when the speaker is telling her own course material and is also an impassioned speaker, making the seminars quite enjoyable. It is the best 'college/textbook' type of 'read' I have come across in a long time- the even include PDFs of the course material (which I did NOT realize until I was about 12% through my current Course on the Black Plague!) *slaps forehead*
Finally, I LOVE memoirs. I also love when they are well written, and 'read' like novels.....The love of fiction was my first! --Jen from Quebec :0)


message 17: by Jillian (new)

Jillian | 416 comments Jennifer Lynn, it was about President Garfield who I think likely would have been a really great president if he had not been shot instead of a president most people know nothing about. It also discusses Charles Guiteau the shooter and all of the medical trials the president went under to try and save his life.


message 18: by Kelly (new)

Kelly Audiogirl.booking.it (audiogirlbookingit) | 366 comments Marta wrote: "Kelly wrote: "Marta wrote: "I am mostly a fiction reader but I like to mix it up with non-fiction. I just looked at how many I read, it appears it is 10-15% of my reads, but it feels like more, bec..."

Yes Marta! I loved Furiously Happy!! Jenny Lawson is fantastic. Actually my book club is doing her other book Let's Pretend This Never Happened this month. It was great as well but I appreciated her openess about mental illness more in Furiously Happy!

Did you read...

When Breath Becomes Air

The Glass Castle: A Memoir

The Gratitude Diaries: How a Year Looking on the Bright Side Can Transform Your Life

Loved all of those!!


message 19: by Marta (new)

Marta (Gezemice) | 699 comments Kelly, I have not yet read those but did think about reading them. I keep my tbr pretty tidy... :) They sound great and heard a lot about them!


message 20: by Jen from Quebec :0) (last edited Jul 03, 2017 09:56PM) (new)

Jen from Quebec :0) (MuppetBaby99) | 76 comments Kelly wrote: "Marta wrote: "Kelly wrote: "Marta wrote: "I am mostly a fiction reader but I like to mix it up with non-fiction. I just looked at how many I read, it appears it is 10-15% of my reads, but it feels ..."

KELLY- Awesome stuff! I actually liked Let's Pretend This Never Happened: A Mostly True Memoir Let's Pretend This Never Happened A Mostly True Memoir by Jenny Lawson much more than Furiously Happy: A Funny Book About Horrible Things Furiously Happy A Funny Book About Horrible Things by Jenny Lawson , which is a bit of a bummer.

See, I bought Let's Pretend This Never Happened A Mostly True Memoir by Jenny Lawson 'Let's Pretend This Never Happened' via Kindle and liked it so much that I later spent $$ on the brand new hardcover of 'Furiously Happy' Furiously Happy A Funny Book About Horrible Things by Jenny Lawson when it was released and was/am bummed out that I now own a physical copy of the least favorite of the two books (well, for me, anyways.) It was still good, but not GREAT, as the 1st book was...

As for The Glass Castle: A Memoir The Glass Castle A Memoir by Jeannette Walls I actually TEACH this book in my English high school classes! Thus, I cannot tell you just HOW MANY TIMES I HAVE READ IT- it is an enormous number! I love this book and it leads to cross-lessons in poverty, economics, ethics, etc. I love a well written memoir.

OH! I have also taught the non-fiction book Behind the Beautiful Forevers Life, Death, and Hope in a Mumbai Undercity by Katherine Boo Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Life, Death, and Hope in a Mumbai Undercity both in my English classes and my Ethics classes.

Did anyone read Hillbilly Elegy A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis by J.D. Vance ? It seems to have received a lot of hype this year. I own the Audible audio, and have really been enjoying it, but I think my enjoyment is enhanced by the fact that the author himself reads it himself...which I think should basically be a RULE for memoirs! --Jen from Quebec :0)

(PS) To those who have mentioned Born a Crime Stories From a South African Childhood by Trevor Noah isn't TREVOR NOAH'S VOICE SO GREAT!? That is one to get on audio, for sure.


message 21: by Kelly (last edited Jul 03, 2017 09:56PM) (new)

Kelly Audiogirl.booking.it (audiogirlbookingit) | 366 comments Jennifer Lynn wrote: "Kelly wrote: "Marta wrote: "Kelly wrote: "Marta wrote: "I am mostly a fiction reader but I like to mix it up with non-fiction. I just looked at how many I read, it appears it is 10-15% of my reads,..."

Jen... that is funny sorry you paid too much for a hard cover that stinks!!! I am all about library as much as I can since I rarely ever re-do a books and I am almost exclusively audio. I wonder if you liked the first book you read more than the second...because you read it first? I read them out of order and Furiously Happy was my first exposure to Jennifer Lawson fell in love with her vulnerable and quirky writing style plus I have a MA in counseling so always a bit fascination with mental health issues! I wonder if I would like the first one better if I read it first?? But I enjoy them both.

The Glass Castle is an amazing book! Great book to bring to life in a HS discussion!!

I currently have a Hillbilly Elegy on hold at the library gonna take a while cause I am like 150th on the list!! LOL but guess that is a good sign of a book in demand! Hopefully its worth the wait!


message 22: by Joan (new)

Joan Barnett | 717 comments Jillian wrote: "Jennifer Lynn, it was about President Garfield who I think likely would have been a really great president if he had not been shot instead of a president most people know nothing about. It also dis..."

You'll have to let me know what book that is about Garfield. I love reading about the presidents.

41: A Portrait of My Father - this was actually really good and read by George W. Bush which made it more fun. I'm not a republican and I'm really not a democrat either but I really enjoyed learning more about George H. W. Bush.


message 23: by Marta (last edited Jul 03, 2017 10:00PM) (new)

Marta (Gezemice) | 699 comments I said I was mostly a fiction reader but I happened to be reading three non-fiction books at the moment. Mostly because I quickly finished my fiction while I was sitting on The Daily Show: An Oral History as Told by Jon Stewart, the Correspondents, Staff and Guests for three months. I enjoyed it but the choppy writing style made it slow for me. Recommend for Daily Show fans.

Also reading Eats, Shoots & Leaves: The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation and The Souls of Black Folk, both excellent.

Which reminds me of a nonfiction classic that blew my socks off this year: A Room of One's Own by Virginia Woolf. This should be required reading. It is short but packs a big punch.


message 24: by Jillian (new)

Jillian | 416 comments Joan wrote: "Jillian wrote: "Jennifer Lynn, it was about President Garfield who I think likely would have been a really great president if he had not been shot instead of a president most people know nothing ab..."
The book is Destiny of the Republic: A Tale of Madness, Medicine and the Murder of a President by Candice Millard.


message 25: by Marina H (last edited Jul 03, 2017 11:41PM) (new)

Marina H | 1113 comments You can't stay away from Goodreads too long without new things happening in this group. Great thread and discussion!

I don't read a lot of nonfiction, not as much as I would like. My biggest disadvantage is that I often prefer reading nonfiction in Danish since English is only a second language to me and some nonfiction books I find too hard reading in English. But I don't think a lot of nonfiction books gets translated into Danish, so my options are sometimes limited.

I recently read Missoula: Rape and the Justice System in a College Town by Jon Krakauer. It's not a fun book to read but it's really interesting reading about the justice system, how rape victims are treated and how some young men are put on a pedestal because they play for a college football team.

Another favorite of mine is also The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. As Marta said, it reads like a novel, but you learn a lot from it.

The Girl with Seven Names: A North Korean Defector’s Story I also found really interesting. I learned a lot about North Korea and I'm planning on reading In Order to Live: A North Korean Girl's Journey to Freedom at some point to.
With everything happening in North Korea at the moment, these books might be interesting if you doesn't know much about the country.

On my to-read list is The Glass Castle: A Memoir and When Breath Becomes Air. I'm not sure if they've been published in Danish, but then I'm going to give them a try in English since I really want to read both.


message 26: by Kelly (new)

Kelly Audiogirl.booking.it (audiogirlbookingit) | 366 comments I have had "In order to live" and "Missoula" on my TBR list for a while! Glad to hear they are good. I love non fiction but with a lot of serious heavy content I have to be in the mood to pic one of those dense topic books!

I can see why you would want to read heavy topics in your first language! Pretty impressive to tackle fiction in English. I am a sign language interpreter so not really opportunity to "read" in my second language other than watching vlogs! ;) Wish I had a third or fourth language like a lot of Europeans do!!!


message 27: by Pam (new)

Pam | 1015 comments Jennifer Lynn wrote: "Kelly wrote: "Marta wrote: "Kelly wrote: "Marta wrote: "I am mostly a fiction reader but I like to mix it up with non-fiction. I just looked at how many I read, it appears it is 10-15% of my reads,..."

I read Hillbilly Elegy last year and really enjoyed it! I went to college in Kentucky and had numerous friends, including my brother-in-law, who grew up in eastern KY (Appalchia/coal mining country) and moved away (escaped) to "big" cities like Lexington. I think having this familiarity with the area and people is what inspired me to read the book. That plus seeing an interview with the author. I recommend it!


message 28: by Jillian (new)

Jillian | 416 comments Marina H, I just listened to the audio book of Escape from Camp 14 One Man's Remarkable Odyssey from North Korea to Freedom in the West by Blaine HardenEscape from Camp 14: One Man's Remarkable Odyssey from North Korea to Freedom in the West/Blaine Harden and found it very informative. I will have to check out the book you suggested.

Jennifer Lynn, I also enjoyed Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Life, Death, and Hope in a Mumbai Undercity.


message 29: by Kathy (new)

Kathy | 981 comments Several of you mentioned Furiously Happy: A Funny Book About Horrible Things by Jenny Lawson. I loved this book because it was hilarious and because it was Jenny's personal story about mental illness. There was a very serious section about what helps her when she is having a hard time. I may buy this book some day.

Jillian - Destiny of the Republic: A Tale of Madness, Medicine and the Murder of a President about President Garfield sounds right up my alley.

Another book I listened to on audio was Krakatoa: The Day the World Exploded by Simon Winchester, an excellent science book about an event I just knew had happened and didn't know anything about.

I have the book Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are? on my TBR and hope to read it soon.


message 30: by Camilla (new)

Camilla | 51 comments I read a fair amount of non-fiction. I just checked, and my TBR non-fiction shelf has a little over 1,000 books on it, so a few are still left ;-)

Some that I've enjoyed lately:
The Oregon Trail: A New American Journey This is also narrated by the author, which I always like

Orphan Train Rider: One Boy's True Story interesting, I would probably call this microhistory

The Hospital by the River: A Story of Hope and House Calls Both are memoirs of physicians, but in very different settings

The Motion of the Ocean: 1 Small Boat, 2 Average Lovers, and a Woman's Search for the Meaning of Wife The author whined a bit too much for my liking, but interesting anyway

Bear in the Back Seat II: Adventures of a Wildlife Ranger in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park there are other books in the same series as well

The Underground Girls of Kabul: In Search of a Hidden Resistance in Afghanistan very interesting, about an aspect of the culture I had no idea about

Strangers on the Camino I'd love to walk the Camino de Santiago one day, so this was interesting, although not very useful as a guidebook

Trust Me, I'm a (Junior) Doctor and Where Does It Hurt?: What the Junior Doctor Did Next both quite funny


message 31: by Perri (new)

Perri | 410 comments I primarily read for the thrill of a five star fiction book, but the older I get , the more I seem to enjoy NF. For me, I'm able to read a so-so NF more easily than a so-so F. So many great titles mentioned. I love all of Larson's books I've read, although I found Thunderstruck the weakest.
If you liked Unbroken, I'd also reccomend Seabiscuit: An American Legend. Her research is amazing. It's much larger than horse racing.
I'm fascinated by N. Korea and have read several NF stories some mentioned above, and they read like F-unbelievable!
Also a big Jenny Lawson fan. Dave Barry can be hit and miss, but Best. State. Ever.: A Florida Man Defends His Homeland had me ion stitches. Gosh so much great NF. Glad to see this thread for suggestions


message 32: by Pam (last edited Jul 04, 2017 05:08PM) (new)

Pam | 1015 comments My favorite non-fiction book is Extreme Medicine: How Exploration Transformed Medicine in the Twentieth Century. It's a combination of history and medical - my two favorite NF topics! I borrowed it from the library but recently found it at the Dollar store, so I picked up a copy thinking I will re-read certain chapters. My 2nd favorite is Krakatoa: The Day the World Exploded- fascinating history! Like Kathy (above) I didn't know much about the event before reading the book.

I also own several NF books that I plan on reading soon, including
Brilliant Beacons: A History of the American Lighthouse Brilliant Beacons A History of the American Lighthouse by Eric Jay Dolin and The Road to Little Dribbling: Adventures of an American in Britain The Road to Little Dribbling Adventures of an American in Britain by Bill Bryson. I love the covers on both of these books!

Thanks everyone for the suggestions! The North Korean books look particularly interesting, especially with all that is going on in the world.


message 33: by Nicole (new)

Nicole Sterling | 270 comments Oh, my goodness! I read the first post or two on this thread yesterday & just came back today to see all these awesome suggestions. I'm one of the ones who doesn't read much NF, but am interested in reading more. I think I just added about 20 books to my TBR list. So glad we have this new thread! 😊


message 34: by Katie, Heliocentric Mod (new)

Katie | 1885 comments Mod
I'm with you, Nicole. There is so much going on here. I don't even know where to start!

I read Hillbilly Elegy last year and really enjoyed it. I'm from a very urban/suburban area and I didn't quite realize how different life was in other areas of the country. I thought it was really interesting from a sociopolitical point of view.


message 35: by Katie, Heliocentric Mod (new)

Katie | 1885 comments Mod
What would you guys think of doing a nonfiction buddy read? Doesn't that sound like fun?


message 36: by Jillian (new)

Jillian | 416 comments Katie, as long as I can get the book from the library I would be up for a buddy read.


message 37: by Laura, Celestial Sphere Mod (new)

Laura | 2655 comments Mod
I would like to read Hillbilly Elegy at some point soon. It reminds me a lot of my hometown but I have a feeling that it portrays things from the point of view of a few generations before me. It really feels as if it could be closer to my grandfather's experience especially given the family he married into. I love any stories from a sociological/socioeconomic view so it sounds like it could be good!


message 38: by Kelly (new)

Kelly Audiogirl.booking.it (audiogirlbookingit) | 366 comments I am totally reading hillbilly book as soon as I get it from the library! ;)

I agree learned al lot from the underground girls of Kabul!!! Also really appreciated what I got exposed to in the book "Half the sky"!! So many powerful NF books so much to learn to expand my worldview!!!


message 39: by Marina H (new)

Marina H | 1113 comments I also read The Underground Girls of Kabul. It's so difficult to imagine how it must feel like as a young girl in Afghanistan.

A few years ago I read The Professor and the Madman: A Tale of Murder, Insanity and the Making of the Oxford English Dictionary by Simon Winchester. That one I found really interesting. I had no idea how the proces behind writing this dictionary took place and then to find out one of the biggest contributors was in an asylum for criminal lunatics.


message 41: by Kathryn (new)

Kathryn | 160 comments I highly recommend In Cold Blood; it's considered to be one of the best true crime books ever written and for good reason. Ann Rule is another great true crime author.

I recently read Just Kids, the autobiography of Patti Smith, which portrays the art and music scene in New York in the sixties and seventies.

The other nonfiction I read this year that I thought was really good was Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption, which is written by a pro bono lawyer from the South. It tackles social justice and civil rights, and is also very engaging.


message 42: by Perri (new)

Perri | 410 comments Kathryn wrote: "I highly recommend In Cold Blood; it's considered to be one of the best true crime books ever written and for good reason. Ann Rule is another great true crime author.

..."

RIP Ann Rule,one of my go-to authors . I read her for a subgenre I like-true crime.


message 43: by Marta (new)

Marta (Gezemice) | 699 comments Kathryn wrote: "I highly recommend In Cold Blood; it's considered to be one of the best true crime books ever written and for good reason. Ann Rule is another great true crime author.

..."


In Cold Blood is amazing. Capote was a truly great writer. I loved how non-judgmental he was.


message 44: by Katie, Heliocentric Mod (new)

Katie | 1885 comments Mod
Anyone read any good nonfiction about food? I realized recently that I love reading about food.


message 46: by Kathy (new)

Kathy | 981 comments Katie, for a book that combines memoir, books and food I liked Voracious: A Hungry Reader Cooks Her Way through Great Books. I also liked Laurie Colwin's book Home Cooking: A Writer in the Kitchen.


message 47: by Anastasia (new)

Anastasia (AnastasiaHarris) | 1063 comments Immoveable Feast: A Paris Christmas is a really good book about food. He is an Australian, who has lived in America that is making Christmas dinner for his French in-laws. It is very funny.

My Life in France is a great book written about Julia Child.


message 48: by Jody (new)

Jody (jodybell) | 3140 comments I keep meaning to come in and join the discussion, I've finally made it!

I really enjoy reading non-fiction. I think it has a bit of a bad rep, and that a lot of people dismiss it outright as being dry and boring, when in reality there are a lot of absolutely fascinating books out there. It's really varied in genre and style, just like fiction. That's not to say that there aren't dry and dull ones out there, but there are quite a lot of fiction books that fit that description too.

I thought I had read a few non-fiction books, so I went and created a shelf here for my read ones - turns out I've read a lot more than I'd realised - 72! I've got three on the go at the moment too. I find them to be great palate cleansers when I'm in a bit of a downward spiral from shitty fiction books (which I'm in a the moment).

Generally, I'd say that memoirs are my least favourite genre of non-fiction, although that said, I have read some incredible ones - Night in particular is amazing. My other favourite non-fiction read is The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks - I'm not a science person, but I found it totally fascinating and compelling.

I'm planning on a bit of a non-fiction binge this month. I'm slowly progressing through a couple (On Photography and The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer) that I'm in no rush to finish. I started reading Man's Search for Meaning last night, and it's excellent. Next I think I want to read either The Diving Bell and the Butterfly or Columbine.


message 49: by Katie, Heliocentric Mod (new)

Katie | 1885 comments Mod
I just made a list of nonfiction books from my TBR, so when I get a hankering for nonfiction, I cab look for one place for ideas. I need to make a shelf for the nonfiction I've already read. I wonder how much it would be.


message 50: by Katie, Heliocentric Mod (new)

Katie | 1885 comments Mod
Also I'm playing with the idea of doing my challenge as much nonfiction as possible next year. I don't know if I'll really want to do that when it comes down to it though. I'm just super in a nonfiction mood right now.


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