Reading 1001 discussion

20 views
Archives > Hilde's Road Trip through USA :)

Comments (showing 1-18 of 18) (18 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Hilde (last edited Oct 02, 2017 04:46AM) (new)

Hilde (Hilded) | 199 comments
Hilde's Visited States Map


States visited: 9
Landmarks visited: 4
Points: 16

States
1. Rhode Island: At the Mountains of Madness by H.P. Lovecraft ⭐⭐ (3 points)
2. Massachusetts: The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath ⭐⭐⭐⭐ (1 point)
3. New York: The New York Trilogy by Paul Auster ⭐⭐⭐(⭐) (No points claimed)
4. Ohio: Beloved by Toni Morrison ⭐⭐⭐⭐ (3 points)
5. Kentucky: Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe ⭐⭐⭐(⭐) (1 point)
6. Tennessee: They Shoot Horses, Don't They? by Horace McCoy ⭐⭐⭐(⭐) (3 points)
7. Alabama: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ (3 points)
8. Mississippi: The Optimist's Daughter by Eudora Welty ⭐⭐⭐ (1 point)
9. Arkansas: I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou ⭐⭐⭐⭐ (1 point)

Landmarks
1. Federall Hill, Rhode Island
2. Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Ohio
3. Graceland, Tennessee
4. Dreamland, Alabama

At the Mountains of Madness by H.P. Lovecraft The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath The New York Trilogy by Paul Auster Beloved by Toni Morrison Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe They Shoot Horses, Don't They? by Horace McCoy To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee The Optimist's Daughter by Eudora Welty I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou


message 2: by Hilde (last edited Jul 13, 2017 08:56AM) (new)

Hilde (Hilded) | 199 comments 1. Rhode Island: At the Mountains of Madness by H.P. Lovecraft ⭐⭐

GR synopsis:
Long acknowledged as a master of nightmarish vision, H.P. Lovecraft established the genuineness and dignity of his own pioneering fiction in 1931 with his quintessential work of supernatural horror, At the Mountains of Madness. The deliberately told and increasingly chilling recollection of an Antarctic expedition's uncanny discoveries --and their encounter with an untold menace in the ruins of a lost civilization--is a milestone of macabre literature.

Started my journey in Rhode Island with what I thought would be a scary book. But boy, was I bored, and at no point even a hint of scared. I really wanted to like this because H.P. Lovecraft is so influential in horror, but this was not for me. So many boring details, and so little action. Dyer just tells and tells and delivers information about the ancient creatures in the dullest possible way, there is no excitement or fright in this novel, there is only *loads* of information.

The book is filled with good imagery, such as the grotesque penguins, but they are suffocated by the sheer amount of information that Lovecraft dumps on his readers, without any real plot or character development.

Hopefully my next stop in Massachusetts will be more interesting.

🚘 ➟ Massachusetts and The Bell Jar


message 3: by Jen (new)

Jen | 1876 comments Mod
Hilde wrote: "1. Rhode Island: At the Mountains of Madness by H.P. Lovecraft ⭐⭐

GR synopsis:
Long acknowledged as a master of nightmarish vision, H.P. Lovecraft established the genu..."


I have to say that I agree with you. I didn't love this book and didn't find it scary. I did find the Bell Jar fascinating so hopefully you will too.


message 4: by Hilde (new)

Hilde (Hilded) | 199 comments Glad to hear you liked The Bell Jar, Jen:)
I have high expectations for this one.


message 5: by Hilde (new)

Hilde (Hilded) | 199 comments Note to self; As I am currently in a blackout state (Massachusetts), I must wait until Monday July 24th to continue on west.


message 6: by Jen (new)

Jen | 1876 comments Mod
Hilde wrote: "Note to self; As I am currently in a blackout state (Massachusetts), I must wait until Monday July 24th to continue on west."

You can finish The Bell Jar but then must wait until Monday to move forward into the next state.


message 7: by Hilde (new)

Hilde (Hilded) | 199 comments I am currently visiting New York and 'The New York trilogy' by Paul Auster.

I will update properly when I'm back from my holiday with access to my computer. For now, really enjoying summer vacation and long, lazy mornings :)


message 8: by Jen (new)

Jen | 1876 comments Mod
Hilde wrote: "I am currently visiting New York and 'The New York trilogy' by Paul Auster.

I will update properly when I'm back from my holiday with access to my computer. For now, really enjoying summer vacati..."


Sounds lovely. Have a great holiday!


message 9: by Hilde (last edited Sep 25, 2017 01:53AM) (new)

Hilde (Hilded) | 199 comments 2. Massachusetts: The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath ⭐⭐⭐⭐

I really liked the book, and I don’t understand why it took me so long to finally read it as it had been laying on my shelf unread for quite some time. Glad I finally got around to it.

The Bell Jar has one of the best opening lines I have ever read: "«It was a queer, sultry summer, the summer they electrocuted the Rosenbergs, and I didn’t know what I was doing in New York».

In a few words Plath manage to establish place, time (Julius and Ethel Rosenberg were executed by US authorities in June 1953 for espionage), loneliness, turmoil and death. The most fascinating with the Bell Jar is how the novel gradually darkens. In the beginning I laughed with Esther and her petty considerations, but they become less witty later on. A really good novel.

🚘 ➟ New York and The New York Trilogy


message 10: by Hilde (last edited Aug 21, 2017 06:50AM) (new)

Hilde (Hilded) | 199 comments 3. New York: The New York Trilogy by Paul Auster ⭐⭐⭐(⭐)

My third visit was in the beautiful city of New York, one of the cities I have actually visited in real life :)
I enjoyed my stay here with The New York Trilogy .

This was my first encounter with Paul Auster. The New York Trilogy is comprised of three loosely connected stories (City of Glass, Ghosts, and The Locked Room). What was it about? I honestly got no idea. The New York Trilogy is an incredible anthology of mystery stories, written with an evocative voice and a completely original style.

It was both weird and pretty fantastic about identity. Who I am? Is it possible to become someone else by studying them? You as a reader become the investigator. You'll get clues, but without the guarantee you'll get all of them. You'll get answers, but you'll have to find more by yourself. The book made my tiny brain spin, but in a good way. It made me intrigued and curious, and left me confused. It also excited me, and was full of elegant formulations. But I am not really sure what it was all about.

I think I need to re-read it at some point, to see if I catch more of the clues along the way. I definitely think the book is worthy of the list.

I am by the way enjoying New York so much, that I think I have to stay here until next week when I will book a flight ticket to Ohio and skipping Pennsylvania for this time.

I will not claim a point for this book here, as it was also part of my randomiser list.

Currently: 4 points (3 points for Mountains of Madness and 1 point for The Bell Jar).


message 11: by Hilde (last edited Aug 21, 2017 06:17AM) (new)

Hilde (Hilded) | 199 comments I will book a flight ticket from NY to Ohio on Monday 28 Aug.

✈️ ➟ Ohio and Beloved


message 12: by Hilde (last edited Sep 25, 2017 02:12AM) (new)

Hilde (Hilded) | 199 comments 4. Ohio: Beloved ⭐⭐⭐⭐(⭐)

GR synopsis:
Staring unflinchingly into the abyss of slavery, this spellbinding novel transforms history into a story as powerful as Exodus and as intimate as a lullaby.

Sethe was born a slave and escaped to Ohio, but eighteen years later she is still not free. She has too many memories of Sweet Home, the beautiful farm where so many hideous things happened. Her new home is haunted by the ghost of her baby, who died nameless and whose tombstone is engraved with a single word: Beloved.

Filled with bitter poetry and suspense as taut as a rope, Beloved is a towering achievement by Nobel Prize laureate Toni Morrison.


Beloved is a beautiful, haunting story that goes deep into the inhumane conditions of slavery. I can not do it justice, so I will leave it at that. The writing is excellent, but it took me quite some time to get through this novel.

Next up, starting today (11.09.2017):
🚘 ➟ Kentucky and Uncle Tom's Cabin


message 13: by Hilde (new)

Hilde (Hilded) | 199 comments 5. Kentucky: Uncle Tom's Cabin ⭐⭐⭐(⭐)

GR synopsis:
The narrative drive of Stowe's classic novel is often overlooked in the heat of the controversies surrounding its anti-slavery sentiments. In fact, it is a compelling adventure story with richly drawn characters and has earned a place in both literary and American history. Stowe's puritanical religious beliefs show up in the novel's final, overarching theme—the exploration of the nature of Christianity and how Christian theology is fundamentally incompatible with slavery.

I enjoyed my stay in Kentucky. I read this when I was little, but didn't remember that much of it. The novel is perhaps more known for it's huge impact in the slavery debate, rather than its literary qualities. The best parts of the book in my opinion were the dialogues, characters and the personal stories.

Next up is Tennessee. I know, I should be moving more to the west to have any chance to reach the goal by the end of the month, but I think that is gone anyway.

🚘 ➟ Tennessee and They Shoot Horses, Don't They?


message 14: by Hilde (last edited Sep 14, 2017 07:54AM) (new)

Hilde (Hilded) | 199 comments 6. Tennessee: They Shoot Horses, Don't They? ⭐⭐⭐(⭐)

GR synopsis:
The marathon dance craze flourished during the 1930s, but the underside was a competition and violence unknown to most ballrooms--a dark side that Horace McCoy's classic American novel powerfully captures. "Were it not in its physical details so carefully documented, it would be lurid beyond itself."—Nation

A quick and interesting read. The story is set under the Great Depression, starts with the ending, and goes back in time to unfold the story. I hadn't heard about the desperate marathon dancing before which seems to have been prevalent for the time period. Quite sad.

Next up is a favourite book of mine, I couldn't resist making a revisit as I love this book. I am going to listen to audio this time, as I have only read it before.

🚘 ➟ Alabama and To Kill a Mockingbird


message 15: by Hilde (new)

Hilde (Hilded) | 199 comments 7. Alabama: To Kill a Mockingbird ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

Coming of age novels doesn’t get much better than this. Jean Lousie Finch, with the surname “Småen" (in Norwegian), tells the story from a couple of her years in her childhood in a little town in Alabama under the Great Depression in the 1930s. Since her mother died when she was two, she is very attached to her father, Atticus, who is a lawyer. In the beginning, we mostly get details from an innocent childhood; how she and her brother Jem gets to know Dill, their spying on the scary neighbor Boo, starting school etc. But through the other youngsters in the neighbourhood, “Småen” and Jem are made aware that their father has taken on defense for a black man who is supposedly guilty of raping a white girl. This is not popular in the city, and through the further hardships in the city, the children discover that people are not always what they appear to be.

Atticus is a rock in the middle of this. He does his best to defend the defendant, and even if his children are exposed to the harassment of the villagers, he does not condemn his opponents. Atticus's motivation to stretch so far has to do what he thinks is right to set an example for his children.

Before the lecture is over, the Finch children have learned more about right and wrong than many grown people ever do. All in all, an impressive book, and a joy to read. A favourite of mine.

I haven’t dared to read sequel, Go Set a Watchman, as I have heard from seveal people that it could somehow destroy the glorifying picture of Atticus that I am left with in To Kill a Mockingbird. Maybe one day. For now, really enjoyed re-reading this one.

My next stop will be Mississippi and The Optimist's Daughter. I am hoping to also reach to Arkansas before Sept 25, to be able to catch a plane west from there. We shall see.

🚘 ➟ Mississippi and The Optimist's Daughter


message 16: by Hilde (new)

Hilde (Hilded) | 199 comments 8. Mississippi: The Optimist's Daughter ⭐⭐⭐(⭐)

GR synopsis:
This story of a young woman's confrontation with death and her past is a poetic study of human relations.

I quite liked this little book, I think it will land somewhere between 3 and 4 stars. Have to think about it a bit more though, a bit uncertain as of now.

🚘 ➟ Arkansas and I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings


message 17: by Hilde (last edited Oct 02, 2017 04:31AM) (new)

Hilde (Hilded) | 199 comments 9. Arkansas: I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings ⭐⭐⭐⭐(⭐)

GR synopsis:
Sent by their mother to live with their devout, self-sufficient grandmother in a small Southern town, Maya and her brother, Bailey, endure the ache of abandonment and the prejudice of the local "powhitetrash." At eight years old and back at her mother’s side in St. Louis, Maya is attacked by a man many times her age—and has to live with the consequences for a lifetime. Years later, in San Francisco, Maya learns that love for herself, the kindness of others, her own strong spirit, and the ideas of great authors ("I met and fell in love with William Shakespeare") will allow her to be free instead of imprisoned.

Poetic and powerful, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings will touch hearts and change minds for as long as people read.


Thanks to a flight back home this weekend, I managed to get some quality reading hours in.

✈️ As Arkansas is a flight destination, I will catch a plane to Colorado for a revisit with On the Road. Edit: I didn't make this flight afterall, and ended my trip in Arkansas.


message 18: by Hilde (new)

Hilde (Hilded) | 199 comments Suddenly September was over! The last week went so fast, and due to a heavy work week I did not manage to finish the last books I had planned, and ended my road trip in Arkansas. So I basically enjoyed the East Coast for this road trip. But that is fine, I quite enjoyed the challenge and most of the books I read.

Thank you for arranging the trip, Jen. Looking forward to an Europe trip next year :-)


back to top