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Archives > Tim H's Summer Road Trip

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message 1: by Tim (new)

Tim Hickman (Tim_R_Hickman) | 11 comments Here we go. Starting in Rhode Island with Mountains of Madness by Lovecraft. Hello Federal Hill!


message 2: by Jen (new)

Jen | 1876 comments Mod
And, I believe you're the only one so far to start off visiting a state with one of the landmarks -- smart!

I hope you like the book. If I remember correctly it was a BOTM several years ago -- I think before we moved over here.


message 3: by Charisma (new)

Charisma (deadlikeme) | 76 comments Jen wrote: "And, I believe you're the only one so far to start off visiting a state with one of the landmarks -- smart!

I hope you like the book. If I remember correctly it was a BOTM several years ago -- I ..."


I loved the book. I was contemplating a re-read, but decided to start in Georgia.


message 4: by Tim (new)

Tim Hickman (Tim_R_Hickman) | 11 comments Mountains of Madness done. 3 points.
On to Massachusetts and The House of Seven Gables.


message 5: by Tim (new)

Tim Hickman (Tim_R_Hickman) | 11 comments Mountains of Madness was included on our Road Trip list in the state of Rhode Island because H. P. Lovecraft was a native of Providence. This novella, published in 1931, set a precedent for science fiction/horror writing of this type. Rooted in the true science of his time, Lovecraft added to his knowledge of geology and archaeology a story of alien creator mythology and ancient dread. Great fun.


message 6: by Tim (new)

Tim Hickman (Tim_R_Hickman) | 11 comments The House of the Seven Gables was included in our Road Trip for the state of Massachusetts because Nathaniel Hawthorne was from Massachusetts (born in Salem). The book also takes place in an unnamed city in Massachusetts.

My favorite part of this tale of Hepzibah, Clifford and Phoebe is the chapter elaborating all of the activities that the loathsome Judge Pyncheon could be doing if he would only get up out of his chair. This action is quite difficult because Judge Pyncheon is dead. Classic.

1 point for this book. Now I have a total of 4 point.
On to New York and Requiem for a Dream.


message 7: by Tim (new)

Tim Hickman (Tim_R_Hickman) | 11 comments Requiem for a Dream was included in our Road Trip for the state of New York because he was born in Brooklyn, New York and because the vast majority of the action in the book takes place in New York City.

The book is a bleak look at four characters as they pursue dreams of transforming their lives while, in fact, becoming more and more deeply addicted to their own vices. The shorthand writing style of Selby brings the reader into the minds of Harry, Marion, Tyrone and Sara as they lose their way. Devastating.

1 point for this book. Now I have a total of 5 points.
On to Pennsylvania and Kotzwinkle's The Midnight Examiner.


message 8: by Tim (new)

Tim Hickman (Tim_R_Hickman) | 11 comments The Midnight Examiner was included in our Road Trip for the state of Pennsylvania because Kotzwinkle is a native, born in Scranton in 1943.

Examiner is a wild ride through 1980s New York City on the coattails of a tabloid editor. Kotzwinkle's book reminds me of how much grimier NYC was in the 80s: porn theaters and winos populated Times Square and middle class people lived on Manhattan. Howard Halliday is our guide to this airbrushed-voodoo-taxicab-thrill ride. Buckle your seatbelts, Uqal Mussa is at the wheel!

3 points for this book since Pennsylvania is also the home of the Liberty Bell. Now I have a total of 8 points.
On to Ohio and White's The Beautiful Room is Empty.


message 9: by Tim (new)

Tim Hickman (Tim_R_Hickman) | 11 comments The Beautiful Room is Empty was included in our Road Trip for the state of Ohio because Edmund White is a native, born in Cincinnati in 1940.

Edmund White's coming-out novel explores the youth and young adulthood of a mid-western gay man in the 1950s and 60s. It is amazing to see how much attitudes toward gay and lesbian Americans has changed in the last 50 years, as the predominate attitude toward homosexuality seen in the book is as a sickness treated by endless psychiatrists and mental hospitals. I'm not a fan of White's prose, earthbound and narcissistic, but the book redeems itself somewhat in the end, introducing the Stonewall Riots which would lead to new openness and respect for LGBT people.

1 point for this book - giving me a total of 9 points.
On to Kentucky and Herr's Dispatches.


message 10: by Tim (new)

Tim Hickman (Tim_R_Hickman) | 11 comments Dispatches was included in our Road Trip for the state of Kentucky because Michael Herr was born in Lexington in 1940 (the same year as Edmund White, above).

Dispatches allows the reader to witness 1967-1969 in Vietnam alongside an 'in-country' war correspondent. Since finishing the book I find myself revisiting his accounts of episodes with soldiers in the midst of the war. Those men are funny, angry, numb, confused, wounded in every sense of the word. A fascinating and brutally honest portrayal of the war and of the role that the media play in such conflicts.

1 point for this book - giving me a total of 10 points.
On to Tennessee and They Shoot Horses Don't They.


message 11: by Tim (new)

Tim Hickman (Tim_R_Hickman) | 11 comments They Shoot Horses, Don't They was included in our Road Trip for the state of Tennessee because its author was born in Pegram, Tennessee in 1897.

Horace McCoy’s 1935 novel was beloved by the French existentialists in the 1950. Gloria expresses the helplessness and anger of a generation coming into adulthood after the Great Depression.

3 points for this book because Graceland is the landmark to visit in the state - giving me a total of 13 points.
Since Tennessee is a flight hub I will jump over Arkansas and go on to Texas and Vernon God Little.


message 12: by Tim (last edited Sep 26, 2017 08:53PM) (new)

Tim Hickman (Tim_R_Hickman) | 11 comments Vernon God Little was included in our Road Trip for the state of Texas because the majority of its action taxes place in Texas.

Foul, crazy, heartbreaking. Brimming with tacked-together, malapropism-filled, newly minted language. Vernon God Little is endlessly surprising, inventive and humorous (in humor's blackest tones). The last book that left me with this many unanswered questions was Junot Diaz' Oscar Wao and that is very high praise.

1 point for this book, giving me a total of 14 points. Since Texas is a flight hub I will jump over New Mexico to Utah, with no listed book, so I will be ending my tour with Hallucinating Foucault..


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